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Screws

NATIONAL
May 23, 2012 | By Tina Susman
This much is certain: The parents of a toddler in Camden, N.J., have one clean kid. But police also want to be sure the child is healthy after the boy got stuck in a washing machine -- the result of a father's attempt at good-natured fun gone awry.  Despite the undisputed idiocy of the move, which was captured on a video gone viral, there are no plans to arrest the parents.
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NATIONAL
March 5, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
About three inches of snow fell overnight in southern Indiana, slowing cleanup efforts and compounding the misery in areas hard hit by tornadoes in recent days, a state official said Monday morning. The snow creates problems such as hiding nails, screws, boards and other debris on roads, making it a bit more difficult to move in cleanup help, State Police Sgt. Ray Poole, public information officer for the state's joint information center, said in a telephone interview. The cleanup "hasn't come to a complete, screeching halt," Poole said, "but it does hide nails and screws, and we don't want people stepping on them.
HEALTH
January 23, 2012 | Marc Siegel, The Unreal World
"Grey's Anatomy" 9 p.m. Jan. 5, ABC Episode: "Suddenly" The premise Dr. Teddy Altman (Kim Raver) is operating on a patient who came to the hospital for spinal fusion surgery but now is having heart problems. It turns out that a screw came loose and traveled to her heart, where it sliced the muscle in several places. Teddy tries to sew the heart back together, but she can't get good access to the mitral valve because of scarring. When a suture falls off, she decides to remove the entire heart from the patient's chest, repair it in a bowl of ice and then sew it back in. Teddy doesn't yet realize that her husband, Henry Burton (Scott Foley)
OPINION
December 15, 2011 | Meghan Daum
A delightfully useful and versatile term has been floating around a lot lately: "hot mess. " Usually it refers to a person, often (but not always) a woman, whose behavior is exceedingly self-destructive but who remains exceedingly compelling nonetheless. (Type "hot mess" into Google and names such as Lindsay Lohan, Britney Spears and Charlie Sheen make a strong showing.) On the surface, hot mess is derogatory, not to mention a nifty way of shaming and objectifying someone at the same time.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2011 | By Jessica Guynn and Dawn Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
Google Inc. Chairman Eric Schmidt admitted at a technology conference that he tried unsuccessfully to team up with Facebook, which posed a major competitive threat to Google's advertising business, but that the social-networking phenom rebuffed his efforts. Schmidt, who stepped down as chief executive in April to turn over day-to-day control to co-founder Larry Page, said he should have pushed harder. "Three years ago I wrote memos talking about this general problem. I knew that I had to do something, and I failed to do it," he said during a 90-minute onstage interview at the All Things Digital conference in Rancho Palos Verdes organized by the technology blog AllThingsD.
OPINION
May 16, 2011
California's much-vaunted high-speed rail project is, to put it bluntly, a train wreck. Intended to demonstrate the state's commitment to sustainable, cutting-edge transportation systems, and to show that the U.S. can build rail networks as sophisticated as those in Europe and Asia, it is instead a monument to the ways poor planning, mismanagement and political interference can screw up major public works. For anti-government conservatives, it is also a powerful argument for scrapping President Obama's national rail plans, rescinding federal funding and canceling the project before any more money is wasted on it. We couldn't disagree more.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2011 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
By the time Michael Kepler Meo takes the Los Angeles Opera stage on Saturday for "The Turn of the Screw," he will have ventured from his hometown of Portland, Ore., to perform in St. Louis; Vancouver, Wash.; and New York (at Carnegie Hall, no less), and it will be his third production of Benjamin Britten's opera. And he's just 12 years old. The boy's path to singing began when his parents suspected a special voice in their toddler's babbles. At 6, he joined the Portland Boychoir and scored his first opera role two years ago as Miles in the Portland Opera's staging of "Turn of the Screw.
NEWS
September 14, 2010 | By Geraldine Baum, Los Angeles Times
New Yorkers had so many problems breaking in a new electronic voting system, Mayor Michael Bloomberg declared a "royal screw-up" on primary day. Replacing the old lever machines not just in the city but also across the state was a new system in which voters marked paper ballots and then fed them into scanners. Early reports were that scattered polling places either opened hours late because the machines had yet to be delivered or had long lines because others malfunctioned. Mayor Bloomberg spelled out all the problems reported with the new system Tuesday and condemned the city's Board of Elections for not being better prepared.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2009 | Tim Rutten
When it came to the subject of biographies, Sigmund Freud was at his most implacable: "Whoever undertakes to write a biography," he said, "binds himself to lying, to concealment, to hypocrisy, to flummery and even to hiding his own lack of understanding. . . . Truth is not accessible; mankind does not deserve it, and wasn't Prince Hamlet right when he asked who could escape a whipping if he had his deserts?" How did Freud feel about autobiographies? Don't ask. In his latest book, newspaper columnist turned novelist turned screenwriter Pete Dexter has taken the literary-psychoanalytic bull by the horns and -- with characteristic and stylish aplomb -- blown smoke in its formidable face.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2009 | Maria Elena Fernandez
House One doc flew over the cuckoo's nest. Can you guess which one? Clue: He walks with a cane. After that long-awaited sex scene between Cuddy and House, we learned it was all in House's imagination. Amber, Kutner, Cuddy, all of it. In. His. Head. Doc's got major issues. But they're being dealt with at the Mayfield Psychiatric Hospital, thanks to Wilson. What are friends for? Fox, 8 p.m. Monday How I Met Your Mother Ted, bro, she was standing right next to you!
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