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Screwworm

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The dreaded screwworm, which once ravaged livestock and wildlife in the United States and Mexico, has been eradicated from North Africa by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, a victory that pest control experts say has spared Africa, and probably Europe, a disaster. Weekly for six months, a chartered DC-8 flew from a factory in Mexico to Libya carrying 40 million male screwworm flies that had been sterilized by gamma rays.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The dreaded screwworm, which once ravaged livestock and wildlife in the United States and Mexico, has been eradicated from North Africa by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, a victory that pest control experts say has spared Africa, and probably Europe, a disaster. Weekly for six months, a chartered DC-8 flew from a factory in Mexico to Libya carrying 40 million male screwworm flies that had been sterilized by gamma rays.
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NEWS
March 20, 2000
Edward F. Knipling, 91, who helped develop the radiation method of sterilizing insects harmful to plants, animals and humans. Knipling's greatest contribution was eliminating the screwworm fly in North America and with it a threat to the livestock industry. With R.C. Bushland, Knipling used radiation to sterilize male screwworm flies, which then were released to mate with female flies in the wild. The unfertilized eggs did not hatch and the screwworm population eventually was eliminated.
OPINION
August 29, 1999
Re "End U.N. Sanctions Against Iraq," Commentary, Aug 20: An additional reason to end these sanctions is the effect they are having in the region, especially on countries that traditionally are strong allies of the U.S., e.g. Jordan. A lack of veterinary vaccines (its vaccine facility was destroyed because of suspected biological weapons manufacture) and the infrastructure to deliver them to livestock owners have resulted in serious outbreaks of foot and mouth disease in cattle, sheep and goats during the last 6-12 months in Iraq.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1992 | DONNA K.H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two U.S. scientists who nearly 40 years ago developed a technique now commonly used to control such pests as the Mediterranean fruit fly on Monday were awarded the World Food Prize in a ceremony in Des Moines, Iowa. The food prize, which acknowledges contributions to improving the world food supply, is agriculture's equivalent of the Nobel prizes and carries a monetary award of $200,000. This year's winners are Dr. Edward F. Knipling, 83, of Arlington, Va., and Dr. Raymond C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1998
Some areas of the Middle East are becoming infested with a fly-borne outbreak of Old World screw-worm--a disease that affects both animals and humans. The U.N.'s Food and Agriculture Organization says that 58,000 animals and 19 humans have been infected in Iraq since the disease emerged in 1995. It has since spread into Kuwait and Bahrain, and is suspected to be in other countries. the disease is spread by adult screwworm flies that lay eggs on broken skin.
NEWS
May 16, 1990 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nori Tanaka, a scruffy, gray-haired entomologist, trudges through a converted tuna-packing shed, flicking flies off his face. It is just before the dawn of another humid day. In one corner of the ramshackle building, workers grind out sticky, brown fly food in a cement mixer. In another, fly pupae are sifted through a makeshift device of cardboard, old broom heads and wire mesh. Tanaka reeks mightily of sugar, yeast and other odors that come with the job of mating insects.
NEWS
May 16, 1990 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nori Tanaka, a scruffy, gray-haired entomologist, trudges through a converted tuna-packing shed, flicking flies off his face. It is just before the dawn of another humid day. In one corner of the ramshackle building, workers grind out sticky, brown fly food in a cement mixer. In another, fly pupae are sifted through a makeshift device of cardboard, old broom heads and wire mesh. Tanaka reeks mightily of sugar, yeast and other odors that come with the job of mating insects.
NEWS
May 16, 1990 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nori Tanaka, a scruffy, gray-haired entomologist, trudges through a converted tuna-packing shed, flicking flies off his face. It is just before the dawn of another humid day. In one corner of the ramshackle building, workers grind out sticky, brown fly food in a cement mixer. In another, fly pupae are sifted through a makeshift device of cardboard, old broom heads and wire mesh. Tanaka reeks mightily of sugar, yeast and other odors that come with the job of mating insects.
NEWS
July 27, 1985 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Staff Writer
In their 29-year trek from Sao Paulo, Brazil, to Central America, Africanized honeybees have left a trail of destruction and, occasionally, death. They have displaced local bees, decimated the South American honey industry, destroyed thousands of wild and farm animals and killed at least 150 people. Although the recently discovered colony in Kern County most probably represents an isolated outbreak, scientists say, it is only a matter of time before the bees arrive in force in the United States.
MAGAZINE
September 2, 2001 | MICHAEL D'ANTONIO, Michael D'Antonio is a New York-based writer whose last piece for the magazine was about the first Olympic gold medal basketball team. He is co-author, with Harvard professor Andrew Spielman, of "Mosquito: A Natural History of Our Most Persistent and Deadly Foe," published in June by Hyperion
Every day, Nijole Jasinskiene walked down a basement hallway and pulled open a tightly sealed door to the laboratory equivalent of a New Orleans summer. Warm, moist air blew past her as she stepped inside and yanked the door shut. She made her way over to hundreds of white cups holding mosquitoes that had given birth to larvae, which wriggled in trays nearby. For two weeks, Jasinskiene peered into the trays. The larvae were growing. Soon they, too, would be adults.
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