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Scripps League Newspapers

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BUSINESS
May 7, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Pulitzer Publishing Co. announced Monday that it has agreed to buy Scripps League Newspapers for between $230 million and $240 million. Five Scripps League newspapers are in California, including the Record-Gazette in Banning, the Hanford Sentinel, the Napa Valley Register, the Santa Maria Times and the Daily Midway Driller in Taft. Pulitzer publishes the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and the Arizona Daily Star of Tucson.
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BUSINESS
May 7, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Pulitzer Publishing Co. announced Monday that it has agreed to buy Scripps League Newspapers for between $230 million and $240 million. Five Scripps League newspapers are in California, including the Record-Gazette in Banning, the Hanford Sentinel, the Napa Valley Register, the Santa Maria Times and the Daily Midway Driller in Taft. Pulitzer publishes the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and the Arizona Daily Star of Tucson.
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BOOKS
December 26, 1993 | CHRIS GOODRICH
SCRIPPS: The Divided Dynasty by Jack Casserly (Donald I. Fine: $23.95; 236 pp.). The high point of this book comes early, when Ed Scripps, on his first assignment for his mother's Seattle Star newspaper, interviews Jean Harlow. The lady answers her hotel-room door wearing nothing but silver high heels, subsequently completing the ensemble with the addition of a cigarette.
BOOKS
December 26, 1993 | CHRIS GOODRICH
SCRIPPS: The Divided Dynasty by Jack Casserly (Donald I. Fine: $23.95; 236 pp.). The high point of this book comes early, when Ed Scripps, on his first assignment for his mother's Seattle Star newspaper, interviews Jean Harlow. The lady answers her hotel-room door wearing nothing but silver high heels, subsequently completing the ensemble with the addition of a cigarette.
NEWS
July 12, 1986 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
In business meetings at United Press International now, a simultaneous translator sitting behind a screen interprets the words of the new owner to his staff. They, in turn, listen to the translation through headsets. "It's like the United Nations," Editor-in-Chief Maxwell McCrohon said. "But it is a lot faster than having the interpreter in the room."
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