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Scripps National Spelling Bee

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NATIONAL
March 26, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The Scripps National Spelling Bee announced in Kansas City that it would allow a top speller to participate in the national event even though she had been barred last week. "After further consideration, we've determined that Morgan Brown is eligible to compete in the 2008 Scripps National Spelling Bee in Washington, D.C.," said Paige Kimble, director of the bee. Morgan, 12, the winner of a regional state competition, was disqualified because her school did not enroll her according to a new rule requiring individual schools, rather than school districts, to register with the national bee.
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NATIONAL
March 8, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Legendary -- "very famous or well-known" -- How a Jackson County Spelling Bee coordinator  two weeks ago described running out of words to give to seventh-grader Kush Sharma and fifth-grader Sophia Hoffman in Kansas City, Mo. The pair survived 66 rounds before the list of words was exhausted. Slobber -- " to let saliva or liquid flow from your mouth " -- One of the words spelled Saturday when the pair reconnected for another 29 rounds. Boodle -- " a collection or lot of persons " -- What the Helzberg Auditorium at the Kansas City Central Library saw Saturday, forcing organizers to set up a television outside, allowing more people to see the duel.
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NATIONAL
February 8, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Jonesboro, Ark., sixth-grader Morgan Sims knew how to spell "debacle," but she got an unfortunate lesson in its meaning when her school district forgot an important entry fee. Morgan correctly spelled "debacle" -- meaning failure, in an often ludicrous way -- to win the Craighead County Spelling Bee on Friday. But her school forgot to pay the $100-per-school-building entry fee to the Scripps National Spelling Bee required to advance to the state competition. Second-place finisher Elizabeth Kaffka, a fifth-grader at another school, is heading to the state competition instead.
NATIONAL
February 24, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
I-N-D-E-F-A-T-I-G-A-B-I-L-I-T-Y. Indefatigability means tireless determination, but these students almost certainly know that. Two spelling bee competitions in the Midwest over the weekend had to be suspended and rescheduled when their brilliant young contestants dueled for hours to a temporary tie, having mastered dozens of bizarre and foreign words at an early age. After more than 60 rounds of the Jackson County Spelling Bee in Missouri and...
NATIONAL
April 9, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
To bee, or not to bee, has now become a tougher question to answer -- even for whiz kid spellers. The Scripps National Spelling Bee has announced that it is changing the format of its annual competition and adding multiple-choice vocabulary tests to the annual event. To qualify for the semifinals and championship round, spellers will be judged on a cumulative score that incorporates live spelling, computer-based spelling questions and computer-based vocabulary questions, organizers announced on Tuesday.
SPORTS
April 9, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
Wouldn't this be fun to hear at this year's National Spelling Bee: "May I have the definition please?" "No, you should already know it. " Well, things might not get that drastic, but for the first time in its 86-year history, the National Spelling Bee will require contestants to know what the words mean as well as how to spell them. To qualify for the semifinals and finals, spellers will be judged on a cumulative score that incorporates live spelling, computer-based spelling questions and computer-based vocabulary questions, organizers announced Tuesday.
NATIONAL
May 29, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
The battle arena isn't an ice rink or even a basketball court. Nor are the combatants bigger, faster or outsized in any physical way. But for the 281 children participating in year's national spelling bee, the competition is as fierce as any sporting event. The verbal fisticuffs began this week, appropriately televised by the sports network ESPN, which will also broadcast the finals Thursday night. The winner of the 86th Scripps National Spelling Bee gets more than $30,000 cash and prizes.
NATIONAL
March 8, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Legendary -- "very famous or well-known" -- How a Jackson County Spelling Bee coordinator  two weeks ago described running out of words to give to seventh-grader Kush Sharma and fifth-grader Sophia Hoffman in Kansas City, Mo. The pair survived 66 rounds before the list of words was exhausted. Slobber -- " to let saliva or liquid flow from your mouth " -- One of the words spelled Saturday when the pair reconnected for another 29 rounds. Boodle -- " a collection or lot of persons " -- What the Helzberg Auditorium at the Kansas City Central Library saw Saturday, forcing organizers to set up a television outside, allowing more people to see the duel.
NATIONAL
May 31, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
As far as Arvind Mahankali is concerned the fourth time was indeed a charm as the 13-year-old New Yorker overcame his unease with German-derived words to win the Scripps National Spelling Bee. “I had begun to be a little wary of German words,” Arvind said Thursday night, according to media reports of the final. “But this year I prepared German words and I studied them, so when I got German words this year, I wasn't worried.” Arvind earned his trophy and more than $30,000 in cash and prizes by correctly spelling “knaidel,” which as any Jewish mother will tell you is a type of dumpling, usually a matzo ball, often swimming in a bowl of chicken soup.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2010 | Sandy Banks
I'd spent 10 years drilling children for spelling tests, calling out words for my daughters to spell aloud as they prepared for their weekly exams in the car on our morning drives to school. So I didn't hesitate to accept when Walter Reed Middle School teacher Debra Vodhanel invited me to serve as the pronouncer at the local spelling bee this weekend. I'm a writer, a reader, a mother of three. How difficult could announcing a spelling list be? Extraordinarily ( ek-strawr-dn-'air-uh-lee)
NATIONAL
February 24, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
The spelling bee rules are clear: There can be only one. But after more than 60 rounds of the Jackson County Spelling Bee in Missouri and more than 70 rounds in the DeKalb County Spelling Bee in Illinois over the weekend, there are still no winners. In each of the Saturday competitions, two contestants remain after their grueling duels stretched on for hours. Each pair was tentatively set for rematches in two weeks to determine who will head to the Scripps National Spelling Bee. In Kansas City, Mo.,  Sophia Hoffman, 11, and Kush Sharma, 13, were so good at spelling that the competition's judges ran out of words to give them.
NATIONAL
May 31, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
As far as Arvind Mahankali is concerned the fourth time was indeed a charm as the 13-year-old New Yorker overcame his unease with German-derived words to win the Scripps National Spelling Bee. “I had begun to be a little wary of German words,” Arvind said Thursday night, according to media reports of the final. “But this year I prepared German words and I studied them, so when I got German words this year, I wasn't worried.” Arvind earned his trophy and more than $30,000 in cash and prizes by correctly spelling “knaidel,” which as any Jewish mother will tell you is a type of dumpling, usually a matzo ball, often swimming in a bowl of chicken soup.
NATIONAL
May 29, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
The battle arena isn't an ice rink or even a basketball court. Nor are the combatants bigger, faster or outsized in any physical way. But for the 281 children participating in year's national spelling bee, the competition is as fierce as any sporting event. The verbal fisticuffs began this week, appropriately televised by the sports network ESPN, which will also broadcast the finals Thursday night. The winner of the 86th Scripps National Spelling Bee gets more than $30,000 cash and prizes.
SPORTS
April 9, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
Wouldn't this be fun to hear at this year's National Spelling Bee: "May I have the definition please?" "No, you should already know it. " Well, things might not get that drastic, but for the first time in its 86-year history, the National Spelling Bee will require contestants to know what the words mean as well as how to spell them. To qualify for the semifinals and finals, spellers will be judged on a cumulative score that incorporates live spelling, computer-based spelling questions and computer-based vocabulary questions, organizers announced Tuesday.
NATIONAL
April 9, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
To bee, or not to bee, has now become a tougher question to answer -- even for whiz kid spellers. The Scripps National Spelling Bee has announced that it is changing the format of its annual competition and adding multiple-choice vocabulary tests to the annual event. To qualify for the semifinals and championship round, spellers will be judged on a cumulative score that incorporates live spelling, computer-based spelling questions and computer-based vocabulary questions, organizers announced on Tuesday.
NEWS
April 9, 2013 | By Karin Klein
My husband loves words like "leister. " It's a seven-letter word, conferring a 50-point bonus on a Scrabble player, that's made up of common letters in the game's universe of tiles. So are its anagrams "sterile" and "retiles," of course, but you can add an "s" to leister, if there happens to be a spare one on the board. But what does it mean?* At such questions, most tournament-level Scrabble players will do what my husband does -- shrug. Who cares what it means? That's not what Scrabble is about.
NEWS
April 9, 2013 | By Karin Klein
My husband loves words like "leister. " It's a seven-letter word, conferring a 50-point bonus on a Scrabble player, that's made up of common letters in the game's universe of tiles. So are its anagrams "sterile" and "retiles," of course, but you can add an "s" to leister, if there happens to be a spare one on the board. But what does it mean?* At such questions, most tournament-level Scrabble players will do what my husband does -- shrug. Who cares what it means? That's not what Scrabble is about.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2012 | By Matt Stevens, Los Angeles Times
Snigdha Nandipati had a personal photographer following her for much of the Scripps National Spelling Bee. When the TV camera wasn't looking, there was 10-year-old Sujan, snapping picture after picture of his big sister the national spelling champion while she met with ESPN commentators and received interview preparation. "He took the camera from me and he doesn't want to give it back," father Krishnarao said last week. "He really wanted his sister to win. " And when 14-year-old Snigdha did win on Thursday night, a national TV audience was treated to Sujan racing onto the stage and clasping his arms around his sister's waist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2012 | By Matt Stevens, Los Angeles Times
Snigdha Nandipati had a personal photographer following her for much of the Scripps National Spelling Bee. When the TV camera wasn't looking, there was 10-year-old Sujan, snapping picture after picture of his big sister the national spelling champion while she met with ESPN commentators and received interview preparation. "He took the camera from me and he doesn't want to give it back," father Krishnarao said last week. "He really wanted his sister to win. " And when 14-year-old Snigdha did win on Thursday night, a national TV audience was treated to Sujan racing onto the stage and clasping his arms around his sister's waist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2010 | Sandy Banks
I'd spent 10 years drilling children for spelling tests, calling out words for my daughters to spell aloud as they prepared for their weekly exams in the car on our morning drives to school. So I didn't hesitate to accept when Walter Reed Middle School teacher Debra Vodhanel invited me to serve as the pronouncer at the local spelling bee this weekend. I'm a writer, a reader, a mother of three. How difficult could announcing a spelling list be? Extraordinarily ( ek-strawr-dn-'air-uh-lee)
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