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Script Supervisor

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NEWS
June 26, 1996
Fred William Applegate, 92, who made movies for 40 years, from silents to Hollywood's "golden era." A native of Red Oak, Iowa, who grew up in Anaconda, Mont., Applegate came to Los Angeles as a youth, hoping the climate would improve his health. Still in high school, he talked his way into working on the labor gang for the Pickford Fairbanks Studio. In 1925, he began a 40-year career at Warner Bros. studios.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
One of Hollywood's biggest movie stars often retreats to a nondescript building on a quiet industrial street in Van Nuys. For Kristen Stewart, the hide-out provides an escape from prying eyes of the paparazzi, a place where she can play arcade games and read scripts in her own private office. And if the 22-year-old ever needs motherly advice, all she has to do is walk down the hallway. That's where her mom, Jules Stewart, is busy plotting her own career. At 58, the elder Stewart is trying to emerge from the shadow of her daughter, who rocketed to fame on the vampire franchise "Twilight.
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NEWS
May 29, 1993
Lily LaCava, two-term president of the local script supervisors union who worked on popular television shows from "The Jack Benny Show" to the current program "Coach," has died. She was 69. Miss LaCava died Wednesday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center of heart failure after suffering from cancer. She also served as a negotiator for the union, Local 871 of IATSE, the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, and wrote its newsletter. A native of Wilkes-Barre, Pa.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2009 | Cristy Lytal
When Emily Pendas Sobel was interviewing for her first job as a script supervisor on the TV series "Miami Sands," director Andrei Zinca asked her to describe the room she was sitting in. "He was basically wanting to know my observation to details and things like that," she recalls. "We argued over what color the couch was and I was right. And I told him what color socks his receptionist was wearing, so at that point he hired me. They were purple, by the way."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2009 | Cristy Lytal
When Emily Pendas Sobel was interviewing for her first job as a script supervisor on the TV series "Miami Sands," director Andrei Zinca asked her to describe the room she was sitting in. "He was basically wanting to know my observation to details and things like that," she recalls. "We argued over what color the couch was and I was right. And I told him what color socks his receptionist was wearing, so at that point he hired me. They were purple, by the way."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
One of Hollywood's biggest movie stars often retreats to a nondescript building on a quiet industrial street in Van Nuys. For Kristen Stewart, the hide-out provides an escape from prying eyes of the paparazzi, a place where she can play arcade games and read scripts in her own private office. And if the 22-year-old ever needs motherly advice, all she has to do is walk down the hallway. That's where her mom, Jules Stewart, is busy plotting her own career. At 58, the elder Stewart is trying to emerge from the shadow of her daughter, who rocketed to fame on the vampire franchise "Twilight.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1997
Re the photo accompanying the article "A Thing to His Credit" (by Henry Fuhrmann, May 25): To add insult to injury, the man behind the camera is not Chris Nyby, disputed director of "The Thing," but Russell Harlan, who was the director of photography. I know, because I was the script supervisor on the picture. RICHARD KINON Beverly Hills Whether Fuhrmann's uncle directed this movie is a tiny footnote in cinematic history and would never have been the subject of a lengthy article were it not for the fact that he happens to be a Times editor.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1988
One wonders, finally, what prompts movie critics to continue to omit the name of the screenwriter from their reviews. Who do these people think creates the story and characters they almost invariably credit solely to the director? The script supervisor or, as audiences of the '30s thought, the actors themselves? Is it merely naivete or, dare I say it, jealousy? The latest atrocity of this nature occurred in Michael Wilmington's review of Alan Rudolph's "The Moderns" (" 'Moderns'--Creativity in Bloom," May 19)
BUSINESS
September 20, 1987
Harry Bernstein refers to Charlton Heston as an eloquent spokesman for organized labor. Certainly, he was president of the Screen Actors Guild. But in all the years I worked with him on the sets at Paramount in my capacity as a script supervisor (IATSE Local 871) I never found him pro-labor. Then, early on in Hollywood, he was strongly influenced by that great paternalist, Cecil Blount DeMille, and the DeMille Foundation. There is a phrase that describes Heston and his close friend Ronald Reagan.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1996
Contrary to legend, Alfred Hitchcock did not behave like a "sadist" toward Kim Novak while filming her jump into San Francisco Bay for "Vertigo," as was reported by Kenneth Turan ("Still a Dizzying Experience," Oct. 13). The script supervisor's daily reports on the filming, preserved among Hitchcock's papers at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Margaret Herrick Library, throw cold water on Turan's claim that Hitchcock took "revenge" on Novak by "insisting on multiple retakes (one estimate is 24)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2006 | Mary McNamara, Times Staff Writer
THE script for the Academy Awards telecast runs about 250 pages. With another 250 pages of ancillary lists -- of phone numbers, nominees, presenters, orchestra breakdowns and schedules -- it weighs, with its official three-ring binder, almost 8 pounds. By the night of the show, it will look something like a rainbow -- every change requires a new color, and changes are made up until the show begins.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1997
Re the photo accompanying the article "A Thing to His Credit" (by Henry Fuhrmann, May 25): To add insult to injury, the man behind the camera is not Chris Nyby, disputed director of "The Thing," but Russell Harlan, who was the director of photography. I know, because I was the script supervisor on the picture. RICHARD KINON Beverly Hills Whether Fuhrmann's uncle directed this movie is a tiny footnote in cinematic history and would never have been the subject of a lengthy article were it not for the fact that he happens to be a Times editor.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1996
Contrary to legend, Alfred Hitchcock did not behave like a "sadist" toward Kim Novak while filming her jump into San Francisco Bay for "Vertigo," as was reported by Kenneth Turan ("Still a Dizzying Experience," Oct. 13). The script supervisor's daily reports on the filming, preserved among Hitchcock's papers at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Margaret Herrick Library, throw cold water on Turan's claim that Hitchcock took "revenge" on Novak by "insisting on multiple retakes (one estimate is 24)
NEWS
June 26, 1996
Fred William Applegate, 92, who made movies for 40 years, from silents to Hollywood's "golden era." A native of Red Oak, Iowa, who grew up in Anaconda, Mont., Applegate came to Los Angeles as a youth, hoping the climate would improve his health. Still in high school, he talked his way into working on the labor gang for the Pickford Fairbanks Studio. In 1925, he began a 40-year career at Warner Bros. studios.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1994
Auguste Lumiere and his brother Lois are credited as the first to project a film to a paying audience--on Dec. 28,1895. "It can be exploited for a certain time as a scientific curiosity, but apart from that, it has no commercial value whatsoever," said Auguste about their combination camera / printer / projector. He obviously underestimated their achievement.
NEWS
May 29, 1993
Lily LaCava, two-term president of the local script supervisors union who worked on popular television shows from "The Jack Benny Show" to the current program "Coach," has died. She was 69. Miss LaCava died Wednesday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center of heart failure after suffering from cancer. She also served as a negotiator for the union, Local 871 of IATSE, the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, and wrote its newsletter. A native of Wilkes-Barre, Pa.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2006 | Mary McNamara, Times Staff Writer
THE script for the Academy Awards telecast runs about 250 pages. With another 250 pages of ancillary lists -- of phone numbers, nominees, presenters, orchestra breakdowns and schedules -- it weighs, with its official three-ring binder, almost 8 pounds. By the night of the show, it will look something like a rainbow -- every change requires a new color, and changes are made up until the show begins.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1994
Auguste Lumiere and his brother Lois are credited as the first to project a film to a paying audience--on Dec. 28,1895. "It can be exploited for a certain time as a scientific curiosity, but apart from that, it has no commercial value whatsoever," said Auguste about their combination camera / printer / projector. He obviously underestimated their achievement.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1988
One wonders, finally, what prompts movie critics to continue to omit the name of the screenwriter from their reviews. Who do these people think creates the story and characters they almost invariably credit solely to the director? The script supervisor or, as audiences of the '30s thought, the actors themselves? Is it merely naivete or, dare I say it, jealousy? The latest atrocity of this nature occurred in Michael Wilmington's review of Alan Rudolph's "The Moderns" (" 'Moderns'--Creativity in Bloom," May 19)
BUSINESS
September 20, 1987
Harry Bernstein refers to Charlton Heston as an eloquent spokesman for organized labor. Certainly, he was president of the Screen Actors Guild. But in all the years I worked with him on the sets at Paramount in my capacity as a script supervisor (IATSE Local 871) I never found him pro-labor. Then, early on in Hollywood, he was strongly influenced by that great paternalist, Cecil Blount DeMille, and the DeMille Foundation. There is a phrase that describes Heston and his close friend Ronald Reagan.
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