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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2010 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
The more than 300-year-old Torah survived the Holocaust, was later rescued from a deserted Jewish temple in Prague and eventually wound up at a Northridge synagogue. On Sunday, Temple Ahavat Shalom will hold a ceremony to mark the beginning of its restoration. Because of its fragile state, and its age ? scrolls this old are a rarity in the United States, scribes say ? the Torah is exhibited during holidays and services but is seldom used for learning. Temple Ahavat will begin restoring the Scriptures so they can be fully utilized.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2013 | By Christopher Knight
In 1684, the Qing dynasty artist Wang Hui took out his brushes, inks and colors and began to paint a panoramic landscape view. Starting at the right side of a 20-inch-high hand scroll and working toward the left, an imaginative visual journey unfolds along wooded paths, over mountains, through mist-laden valleys and past waterfalls, stopping now and then to rest in a viewing pavilion or at a traveler's retreat before moving on. By the time...
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NEWS
June 29, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
Tony Aliengena of San Juan Capistrano upstaged Lenin's tomb on Wednesday, drawing hundreds of Soviets out of line as he and his family unfurled a 1,000-foot scroll in the middle of Red Square. The event climaxed a day in which the 11-year-old aviator and his family met with top Soviet officials in the Kremlin. They presented the scroll and a sackful of 75,000 pen-pal letters as good-will gestures from children in the United States to children in the Soviet Union. The show of support softened the disappointment the Aliengenas experienced in not being able to meet with Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, who was reported to be presiding over the Supreme Soviet.
WORLD
May 29, 2013 | By Tom Kington
ROME -- An Italian academic has discovered what is believed to be the world's oldest complete Torah -- the holy book of Judaism -- dating back as far as the 12th century.  The scroll of fine lambskin, which measures 118 feet by 25 inches when unrolled, had long sat unnoticed at the University of Bologna, overlooked after being mistakenly dated to the 17th century. But when Hebrew studies professor Mauro Perani examined the Torah this year, he realized the writing had to be much earlier.  Perani noticed that the text did not conform with changes made to the rules of Torah-writing in the 12th century and contained letters and symbols that were banned thereafter.
WORLD
May 29, 2013 | By Tom Kington
ROME -- An Italian academic has discovered what is believed to be the world's oldest complete Torah -- the holy book of Judaism -- dating back as far as the 12th century.  The scroll of fine lambskin, which measures 118 feet by 25 inches when unrolled, had long sat unnoticed at the University of Bologna, overlooked after being mistakenly dated to the 17th century. But when Hebrew studies professor Mauro Perani examined the Torah this year, he realized the writing had to be much earlier.  Perani noticed that the text did not conform with changes made to the rules of Torah-writing in the 12th century and contained letters and symbols that were banned thereafter.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1989 | Claudia Puig, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Many fans spent the weekend mourning the death of Lucille Ball, watching a 10-hour marathon of "I Love Lucy" on Saturday and crowding around her star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on Sunday, leaving flowers and signing a block-long white paper scroll in tribute to her. The scroll, which police said appeared Saturday and extended along the sidewalk from Lucy's star (near the corner of Hollywood Boulevard and Wilcox Avenue) an entire block to Cahuenga Boulevard, was reportedly signed by dozens of fans leaving messages for their beloved queen of TV comedy, who died Wednesday of a ruptured aorta.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2009 | Janice P. Nimura
People confront art in two ways. Some crave context: the who, the how, the why, the when. They need to make sense of the object before them, to place it, to know what is known about it. For others the encounter is purely personal, perhaps even mystical, and explanation can only taint it. Dai Sijie's new novel, "Once on a Moonless Night," seems at first glance to be written for the first group. His narrator, a nameless young French woman studying in Beijing in the late 1970s, falls in love with the young man who sells vegetables in her neighborhood.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2012 | By David Undercoffler, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The 2012 automotive season started with a bang out of Detroit with the 2012 North American International Auto Show. PHOTOS: Highlights from the Detroit Auto Show Ignore the paradox within that name and pay attention to the goods; this year's show featured numerous key releases for automakers. Highlights include new models and concepts from Acura, Audi, Bentley, Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, Dodge, Ford, Honda, Hyundai, Lincoln, Lexus, Mercedes-Benz, Nissan and Porsche.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
Susan Eisner had a problem. The 28-year-old film director was trapped in an airplane, at 19,000 feet, in search of a deck of cards. "I don't know where they are," Eisner of Los Angeles said with a yawn as she contemplated the hours of monotonous flying ahead. "Joe (Bell, 29, a co-director for a film about Tony Aliengena's Friendship Flight) has some, but they're in his bag--in the nose of the plane." The disappearance of Eisner's playing cards on a six-hour flight over a barren Canadian landscape one day last week was just one more rigor of life on the road with Tony, 11, the San Juan Capistrano boy trying to fly around the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2013 | By Christopher Knight
In 1684, the Qing dynasty artist Wang Hui took out his brushes, inks and colors and began to paint a panoramic landscape view. Starting at the right side of a 20-inch-high hand scroll and working toward the left, an imaginative visual journey unfolds along wooded paths, over mountains, through mist-laden valleys and past waterfalls, stopping now and then to rest in a viewing pavilion or at a traveler's retreat before moving on. By the time...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2013 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Geza Vermes was a graduate student in Belgium in the late 1940s when he was captivated by news sweeping the globe about a remarkable discovery in the desert east of Jerusalem. He quickly switched gears, penning his doctoral thesis on the Dead Sea Scrolls, the ancient manuscript fragments that would become a focus of his life's work. FOR THE RECORD: The headline on an earlier version of this article said Vermes had died at the age of 89. He was 88. Also in the earlier version, the first name of Mark Goodacre, an associate professor of religion at Duke University, was incorrectly reported as Martin.
OPINION
March 10, 2013 | By John J. Collins
In June 1954, a small advertisement ran in the Wall Street Journal: "Biblical manuscripts dating back to at least 200 BC are for sale. " The commercial offering was the start of a long and controversial path for the Dead Sea Scrolls, a cache of fragmentary writings in Hebrew and Aramaic (with a few in Greek) that were found in caves near the Dead Sea between 1947 and 1956. The ancient documents include early copies of almost every book of the Hebrew Bible and have been called, justifiably, the greatest archaeological discovery of the 20th century.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The Galaxy S IV, the flagship Samsung smartphone that is expected to be unveiled next week, reportedly will have a feature that will scroll text based on a user's eye movements. The feature, expected to be called "Eye Scroll," follows a user's eye movements to determine when to scroll. For example, when the user's eyes get to the bottom of a page, the phone would scrolls an article up to reveal more paragraphs. The New York Times reported the feature, citing an unnamed Samsung employee.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2013 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
See Now Then A Novel Jamaica Kincaid Farrar, Straus and Giroux: 192 pp., $24 There are two ways to read Jamaica Kincaid's mesmerizing new novel, "See Now Then. " The first is the way any work of art should be read: by simply absorbing what's on the page. This is how I read the first two-thirds of "See Now Then. " "See Now Then" is Kincaid's first novel in a decade, and it's the story of a marriage whose toxicity is killing the two people in it. But more than that, the book reads like an allegory or fable about a doomed family, an effect heightened by its protagonists, Mr. and Mrs. Sweet, having two children with names taken from Greek mythology - Heracles and Persephone.
NEWS
June 5, 2012
Richard H. Chambers U.S. Court of Appeals (once the Emma Bangs' boardinghouse and later Vista del Arroyo Hotel), 125 S. Grand Ave, Pasadena; www.gsa.gov/portal/ext/html/site/hb/category/25431/actionParameter/exploreByBuilding/buildingId/825  Gamble House, 4 Westmoreland Place, Pasadena; (626) 793-3334, www.gamblehouse.org .   Historic homes to see near Gamble House: 1901 Charles Sumner Greene House at 368 Arroyo Terrace; the 1906 Cole House at 2 Westmoreland Place; the 1909 Hindry House at 781 Prospect Blvd.; and Frank Lloyd Wright's Alice Millard House (a.k.a.
TRAVEL
June 3, 2012
WHERE TO STAY Hotel Solamar, 435 6th Ave., San Diego; (610) 819-9500, http://www.hotelsolamar.com . A block from Petco Park, neighbored by the lively Gaslamp District. 235 rooms, pool on fourth-floor terrace. Rooms for two usually $175-$300. La Pensione, 606 W. Date St., San Diego; (619) 232-4683, http://www.lapensionehotel.com . 68 rooms in Little Italy. Pedestrian-friendly. No pool. Rooms for two usually $109-$179. Little Italy Inn, 505 W. Grape St., San Diego; (619)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2012
The Arbitron ratings company agreed Monday to pay $400,000 to settle a lawsuit in which it was accused of under-representing black and Latino listeners in its surveys of radio tastes in California's largest cities. Lawyers for the state, Los Angeles and San Francisco — which will receive the money — contended that Arbitron's Portable People Meters system "dramatically" under-recruited from those populations when it began in 2008. Arbitron found participants mainly by calling land-line telephones, a process that tends to under-represent minority populations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1998
Re "Handwritten Torah Donated to School," Feb. 24. Please note that all Torah scrolls are handwritten by specially trained scribes. There is no such thing as a printed Torah scroll that can be used in any Jewish service. SAUL MATHALON Woodland Hills
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2012
The Arbitron ratings company agreed Monday to pay $400,000 to settle a lawsuit in which it was accused of under-representing black and Latino listeners in its surveys of radio tastes in California's largest cities. Lawyers for the state, Los Angeles and San Francisco — which will receive the money — contended that Arbitron's Portable People Meters system "dramatically" under-recruited from those populations when it began in 2008. Arbitron found participants mainly by calling land-line telephones, a process that tends to under-represent minority populations.
TRAVEL
March 25, 2012
Joshua Tree National Park , 74485 National Park Drive., Twentynine Palms; (760) 367-5500, http://www.nps.gov/jotr. Entrance fee $15 per car for up to seven days. Crossroads Café , 61715 Twentynine Palms Highway, Joshua Tree; (760) 366-5414, http://www.crossroadscafejtree.com . Breakfast, lunch, dinner. All less than $10. Ricochet Gourmet , 61705 Twentynine Palms Highway, Joshua Tree; (760) 366-1898, http://www.ricochetjoshuatree.com . Main dishes $8-$10.
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