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TRAVEL
August 14, 2011 | By Kayleigh Kulp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
We all marveled at the hideous thing, trying not to gasp through our regulators. It was black, striped and about the size of a bass, fins fanning out in all directions. Scuba divers see a lot of weird-looking things but appreciate them all the same. But our dive masters told us that there were bounties on these lionfish, ugly creatures that destroy reef-cleaning fish populations. No one knows where they came from or how many threaten Curaçao's marine park. I had come to this small Caribbean island, 35 miles off Venezuela, in June with my father, Matt, a small-business owner.
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NEWS
September 17, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
A preliminary study finds that scuba diving may help improve muscle movement, touch sensitivity and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in people with spinal cord injuries. The small pilot study, presented Saturday at the Paralyzed Veterans of America conference in Orlando, Fla., involved 10 wheelchair-dependent disabled veterans who had suffered spinal cord injuries an average 15 years earlier and who underwent scuba diving certification. Pre-dive tests checked the participants' muscle spasticity, motor control, sensitivity to light touch and pinpricks, plus depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1986
A 24-year-old San Diego man drowned while scuba diving off La Jolla Sunday, the San Diego County coroner's office reported. James Jeffrey Ridinger was declared dead on arrival at Scripps Memorial Hospital in La Jolla at 11:57 a.m., said Deputy Coroner Everett Mauger. Ridinger and a companion were diving when Ridinger became lost in about 120 feet of water, Mauger said. Two boaters later found Ridinger's body on the surface about 75 yards from the shore. The boaters notified lifeguards.
TRAVEL
August 14, 2011 | By Kayleigh Kulp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
We all marveled at the hideous thing, trying not to gasp through our regulators. It was black, striped and about the size of a bass, fins fanning out in all directions. Scuba divers see a lot of weird-looking things but appreciate them all the same. But our dive masters told us that there were bounties on these lionfish, ugly creatures that destroy reef-cleaning fish populations. No one knows where they came from or how many threaten Curaçao's marine park. I had come to this small Caribbean island, 35 miles off Venezuela, in June with my father, Matt, a small-business owner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2001 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jon Hardy, a scuba diving pioneer and diving industry leader who initiated the first consumer-oriented testing of diving equipment a decade ago and was a longtime fixture in the waters off Catalina, has died. He was 62. Hardy, who owned an Avalon charter diving boat and ran a light commercial operation, died Aug. 29 at his son's home in Carpinteria after a brief battle with cancer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1988 | REBECCA KOLBERG, United Press International
Scuba diving is opening up an underwater frontier to many people but if safety rules are ignored, it could land them in a hospital with medical problems ranging from dizziness to paralysis, or even end in death. Among the fastest growing of outdoor activities, the number of certified scuba (self-contained underwater breathing apparatus) divers is currently estimated to be at least 750,000 and possibly as high as 1.5 million--up from just 213,000 in 1975.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1993 | STEPHANIE STASSEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sleepy divers are awakening on the boat anchored beside the craggy cliffs of San Clemente Island. In the galley, Gordon Page finishes his pancakes and scrambled eggs, and plans his first underwater adventure of the day. It's going to be a deep one--120 feet--just 10 feet shy of the recommended maximum depth for sport divers. Ready to begin the arduous task of suiting up, Page makes his way onto the deck of the Charisma.
NEWS
November 29, 1992 | From Associated Press
Vice President-elect Al Gore and his family went scuba diving and explored the coral reef off the Florida Keys Friday. The Gores arrived Tuesday at Little Palm Island, a resort about 28 miles northeast of Key West, and they've been sunbathing, para-sailing and learning to scuba dive, said Joe Roth, a general partner of Little Palm Island. "He told me the whole idea behind the vacation was to be able to spend some quality time with (wife) Tipper and the children," Roth said.
NEWS
January 17, 1988
If you want to learn scuba diving, there is only so much you can do in the classroom. Sooner or later you must get wet. So, Gahr High School students who signed up for scuba training got their baptism at the Cerritos Olympic Swim Center. The first subject is safety. This was the first pool session in the 5-day-a-week class which lasts three weeks. The training is provided free by instructors from Scuba Safety Inc. of Downey, which conducts the course at 26 schools a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1991
A 35-year-old physician was listed in critical condition Sunday night after nearly drowning while scuba diving off Point Loma. No pulse was detected for 50 minutes on Dr. Mark Rubin of San Diego, before paramedics were able to revive him, said Brant Bass, a spokesman for the San Diego city lifeguards. Rubin was one of six divers participating in a dive in the kelp beds off Point Loma, Bass said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2010 | By Margot Roosevelt, Los Angeles Times
Daniel Carlock, a Santa Monica aerospace engineer, prayed to God not to let him die after he was abandoned floating in the ocean 12 miles off Long Beach by leaders of a scuba diving excursion. After nearly five hours, surrounded by thick fog, "I had this feeling my spirit was getting ready to vacate my body," he recalled. On Friday, a Los Angeles County Superior Court jury awarded Carlock $1.68 million in damages in his five-year legal battle against Venice-based Ocean Adventures Dive Co. and Long Beach-based Sundiver Charters.
NEWS
October 11, 2009 | Eric Tucker, Tucker writes for the Associated Press
Scuba shop owner David Swain and his wife of six years, Shelley Tyre, traveled to Tortola in 1999 for what was to be a romantic Caribbean getaway. Swain came back alone. Tyre drowned while scuba diving in what authorities in the British Virgin Islands called an accident. They allowed Swain to take her body home. Her parents sued three years later, accusing Swain of killing their daughter, saying he was romancing another woman and that the couple's prenuptial agreement denied him money if they divorced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A 50-year-old man drowned while scuba diving in rough waters north of Jenner, the Sonoma County Sheriff's Department said. Victor Smith of Petaluma got stuck Sunday in a crack of a rock at Stillwater Cove Regional Park, said Sheriff's Sgt. Eric Thomson. Large waves hampered efforts by a friend, a lifeguard and a helicopter crew to rescue him, Thomson said. Smith was the fifth diver to die in April on the North Coast. Four others died earlier in the month while hunting for abalone.
NEWS
May 17, 2005 | Scott Doggett
More than 60 years have passed since underwater explorer Jacques Cousteau and engineer Emile Gagnan freed divers from heavy helmets and cumbersome diving suits with their self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA), which has since gone through more transformations than Madonna. Nick Icorn, one of the first people in the U.S. to use the equipment, has been collecting scuba gear since it was first introduced. Now 76, he dreams of opening a history-of-scuba museum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2005 | Erika Hayasaki, Times Staff Writer
The Santa Monica couple had plunged 60 feet under water on a scuba diving trip near Ko Phi Phi island in Thailand when the first tsunami current began to suck them down farther. Silt from the ocean floor swirled wildly. The force of the tsunami pulled the couple apart. Then everything became white. Eugene Kim, 34, a transportation consultant, saw only soupy water and bubbles. The current tossed his body around like he was inside a washing machine.
NATIONAL
November 9, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A decorated Navy veteran who robbed a credit union and then hid in the Mississippi River in scuba gear was sentenced in St. Paul to 11 years in prison. Mark W. Samples, 41, of Hager City, Wis., was convicted in May of stealing more than $70,000 in the holdup. Witnesses said he fled on a mountain bike, then made his way to the river's edge, donned scuba gear and drifted downstream to his car.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2004 | Steve Harvey
Even with all the talk of budget cuts, I was surprised to read that the federal government was taking the extreme step of closing the Pacific Ocean to visitors on Thursdays. I have to admit I didn't see a story in The Times about the shutdown but found an account in the latest issue of the Reef Seeker, a scuba diving publication (see accompanying).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Albert A. Tillman, 75, a pioneer in teaching and certifying scuba diving, died Friday in Seattle of unspecified causes. A native of Los Angeles, Tillman started diving at age 10 and later took diving classes at the University of Hawaii while serving in the Army during World War II.
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