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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2009 | Times Staff And Wire Reports
Ruth Duckworth, a noted modernist sculptor and muralist who created abstract ceramic forms for pieces breathtakingly large and charmingly small in her studio in a renovated Chicago pickle plant, has died. She was 90. Duckworth died Oct. 18 at a Chicago hospice after a brief illness, said Thea Burger, her agent. She was both a master of ceramics and of escaping easy definition, the Washington Post said in a 2006 article on a traveling retrospective of Duckworth's work, which was shown at the Smithsonian's Renwick Gallery.
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BUSINESS
April 19, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
Actress Anjelica Huston has parted with the five-story contemporary live/work home in Venice that she shared with her late husband, sculptor Robert Graham, for $11.15 million. The 13,796 square feet of loft-like space, some 200 feet from the sand, includes a 10,000-square-foot art studio that was used by Graham, a dance studio, a gym, a library/study, a media room, an office, three bedrooms and 3.5 bathrooms. The home and studio share a central courtyard shaded by a coral tree.
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NEWS
October 18, 2012 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times staff writer
American travelers, is J. Seward Johnson stalking you? Because he certainly seems to be stalking me. J. Seward Johnson , 82, is a sculptor. In fact, he might be the most ubiquitous American sculptor you've never heard of. If you've spent any time at all in big and medium-sized American cities in the last decade or two, you've probably bumped into his work -- usually human figures, life-sized and larger -- and you've probably smiled without noting his name. Since 2005, Johnson has been taking familiar two-dimensional images - often a famous photo or an Impressionist painting - and casting them as larger-than-life, three-dimensional sculptures, their contours smooth and boldly colored.  Jumbo kitsch, some people say. Remember the famous black-and-white photo of the sailor kissing the young woman in Times Square at the end of World War II?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
Authorities say the killing on March 1, 1976, began after William Bradford Bishop Jr. learned he'd been passed over for a promotion at the State Department earlier in the day. Bishop had been receiving psychiatric care for depression and suffered from insomnia when, the FBI alleges, he took a hammer to his wife, mother and kids at their home in Bethesda, Md. His wife, Annette; his 68-year-old mother, Lobelia; and three sons - William Bradford III,...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1992
I was very pleased to see such an extensive article on the sculpture at the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, knowing that two years were spent doing the three primary pieces, life-size bronzes of Jack Benny, Lucille Ball and Johnny Carson, two of which were in all four photographs. It was not until I read the entire article that I discovered no credit was given the sculptor. This is a common occurrence that needs correction. The writer of the article has his byline. The photographer is given credit.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
Gifted and tormented sculptor, involuntary mental patient, enduring symbol of female passion quashed by patriarchal convention - Camille Claudel is nothing if not a rich subject for storytellers. "Camille Claudel 1915," the tough and measured feature by Bruno Dumont, is a very different animal from the high melodrama of the 1988 biopic starring Isabelle Adjani. That's no surprise from a filmmaker who traffics in austerity and a performer, Juliette Binoche, who's ever resistant to the obvious and formulaic.
SPORTS
October 23, 2012 | Chris Erskine
John Wooden is back. Not soon enough, in this me-first, Black Mamba world riddled with ego and hubris. Wooden's glory grows with each passing year, and every time Jonathan Vilma appeals his NFL case, or Lance Armstrong insists it's all a set-up. With Vince Lombardi, Wooden is the symbol of "old school" values. His simple virtues, his stubbornness, his bone-deep integrity are needed now more than ever. Got a hole in your Friday schedule? Take your kid over to UCLA to meet Coach. In the little village of Westwooden.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1985 | MATT DAMSKER, San Diego County Arts Writer
The most public of the arts attractions slated for downtown's Horton Plaza shopping center will be the three artworks to be unveiled along with the center itself in August although public, in this case, doesn't necessarily mean popular. The three artists commissioned are certainly adventurous, if not avant-garde, and it's a matter of some suspense as to just what they'll come up with for the commercial gem of downtown's renaissance. The plaza developer, Ernest W. Hahn Inc.
NEWS
April 9, 1986 | WENDY HASKETT
"Art isn't a luxury. It's absolutely essential to our mental and physical well-being," sculptor John Dunn said. "If we're not exposed to some form of it early enough in childhood we suffer a kind of brain damage--the mental connections aren't made." It is a foggy Wednesday evening in an area of Cleveland Street that is a higgledy-piggledy tangle of rusting warehouses and automobile body shops.
MAGAZINE
May 18, 1986 | BEVIS HILLIER
Everyone told Sean Afshar he was crazy to leave a well-paying job at Douglas Aircraft to design and sell furniture. But then, they all laughed at Christopher Columbus, too. Afshar had left his native Iran 14 years earlier to study aeronautical engineering in England.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
The Times asked its reporters and critics to highlight figures in entertainment and the arts who will be making news in 2014. Here's who they picked: Anne Ellegood | Curator Hammer Museum Senior Curator Anne Ellegood will likely see some attention this spring with the debut of her long-mulled, provocative show "Take It or Leave It: Institution, Image, Ideology. " The 35-artist historical show - co-organized by Ellegood's friend, New York-based art historian Johanna Burton - is an institutional critique of museums themselves as it examines American artists who the curators felt have changed the way we, as a culture, think about art. Among those included in the exhibition, focusing on work largely from the '80s and '90s, are Barbara Kruger, Mike Kelley, Jimmie Durham, Adrian Piper and David Wojnarowicz.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
Gifted and tormented sculptor, involuntary mental patient, enduring symbol of female passion quashed by patriarchal convention - Camille Claudel is nothing if not a rich subject for storytellers. "Camille Claudel 1915," the tough and measured feature by Bruno Dumont, is a very different animal from the high melodrama of the 1988 biopic starring Isabelle Adjani. That's no surprise from a filmmaker who traffics in austerity and a performer, Juliette Binoche, who's ever resistant to the obvious and formulaic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2013
Peter Kaplan Editor hired 'Sex and the City' columnist Peter Kaplan, 59, the former editor of the New York Observer who hired a then-unknown Candace Bushnell to write a column called "Sex and the City," died Friday of cancer in New York City, said his wife, Lisa Chase. He edited the Observer from 1994 to 2009. The salmon-colored weekly has a reach beyond its circulation of about 50,000 because it is read by the Manhattan-based movers and shakers it covers. Kaplan was credited with honing the paper's snarky tone and hiring writers who became influential voices.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2013 | By David Ng
Sir Anthony Caro, the renowned British sculptor whose abstract creations have been hugely influential, has died. The 89-year-old artist suffered a heart attack and died on Wednesday, said the Tate Museum in London. Caro is recognized widely for helping to redefine sculpture in the 20th century, often working with steel and other industrial material to create monumental installations that broke with past traditions. His work has been exhibited in major museums and galleries around the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2013 | By Suzanne Muchnic
Japanese American artist Ruth Asawa was interned during World War II, first at the Santa Anita racetrack in Arcadia, where she lived in a horse stall that reeked of manure, and then at a relocation center in Arkansas, where 8,000 detainees were surrounded by barbed wire fences and watch towers. It was a defining experience, but not a devastating one. Decades later, when Asawa had achieved fame in the art world and admiration in San Francisco as an educator and arts advocate, she told an interviewer that she felt no hostility about the painful period in her youth and blamed no one for her hardship.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
The lovely and poignant drama "The Artist and the Model" stirringly presents art, life and death as one irrevocably tangled trio. That it's set against the German-occupied France of World War II - and all the civilian wariness and reflectivity that went with it - deeply dimensionalizes the movie's rich characters and complex themes. At its heart, this talent-heavy film, directed by Fernando Trueba ("Belle Epoque," "Chico & Rita") from a script he wrote with veteran screenwriter and frequent Luis Buñuel collaborator Jean-Claude Carrière, involves the symbiotic relationship between an aging sculptor, Marc (Jean Rochefort)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2000 | VIVIAN LETRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leonardo DiCaprio, whose fame buoyed after the hit movie "Titanic," will shine his starlight on an obscure Los Angeles artist with an exhibition in Orange County. DiCaprio confirmed his intention to sponsor the art show, "Struggle: The Art of Stanislav Szukalski," which opens Nov. 12 at the Laguna Art Museum. DiCaprio will contribute up to $15,000 as part of a gift, museum officials said. The artist, who died in 1987, was a Polish sculptor whom DiCaprio knew when the actor was a boy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 2001
Art show--The Times on Thursday incorrectly reported the name of a sculptor whose works are on exhibit at the Buenaventura Gallery. She is Virginia Buckle.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2013 | By David Ng, This post has been corrected. See note at the bottom for details.
Walter De Maria, the artist and sometime musician whose monumental sculptures and installations combined the simplicity of minimalism with a love of scale, died Thursday at age  77. The cause of death was a stroke, according to his New York studio. Throughout his career, De Maria cultivated a somewhat reclusive personality as far as the media was concerned. He seldom gave interviews and disliked being photographed. He also avoided participating in museum shows when he could, preferring to create his installations outdoors or at unconventional urban locations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Richard Artschwager, an artist who turned his apprenticeship as a cabinetmaker into a distinctive approach to making sculptures and paintings that defy easy categorization, died Saturday in Albany, N.Y., following a brief illness. He was 89. A retrospective of Artschwager's work, which travels to the UCLA Hammer Museum in June, closed Feb. 3 at the Whitney Museum of American Art in Manhattan. It was the Whitney's second Artschwager retrospective and will be the third to be shown in Southern California.
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