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Sculptor

ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
The lovely and poignant drama "The Artist and the Model" stirringly presents art, life and death as one irrevocably tangled trio. That it's set against the German-occupied France of World War II - and all the civilian wariness and reflectivity that went with it - deeply dimensionalizes the movie's rich characters and complex themes. At its heart, this talent-heavy film, directed by Fernando Trueba ("Belle Epoque," "Chico & Rita") from a script he wrote with veteran screenwriter and frequent Luis Buñuel collaborator Jean-Claude Carrière, involves the symbiotic relationship between an aging sculptor, Marc (Jean Rochefort)
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NEWS
April 12, 1987 | MARY LOU LOPER, Times Staff Writer
Pascal, the renowned artist-sculptor (Jimmy's devotees pass her sculpture en route to their tables), has been named Distinguished Honoree for this year's National Arts Assn. Orchid Ball. According to Marilyn Rudley and Alice Moore, she's the only sculptor in the world known to work in glass with hammer and chisel. The group's 17th ball is May 8 at the Beverly Wilshire Grand Ballroom. Ball chairman Mrs. William Hollingsworth has arranged for Henry Mancini to conduct a 35-piece orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2009 | Suzanne Muchnic
A hushed throng of artists, arts patrons and civic leaders joined friends and family of the late sculptor Robert Graham at a funeral Mass on Wednesday morning at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels. Filing through the cathedral's "Great Bronze Doors," which Graham considered his greatest public commission, the crowd came to mourn the loss and celebrate the life of a creative force who died at 70 on Dec. 27 after a long illness. Los Angeles' leading public artist, Graham is probably best known for sculptural monuments in prominent locations across the country, including tributes to Franklin D. Roosevelt in Washington, Joe Louis in Detroit, Duke Ellington in New York and Charlie "Bird" Parker in Kansas City, Mo. But his most enduring subject was the female nude, which he explored in hundreds of works, large and small, throughout his long career.
NEWS
December 11, 1998 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The enemies of "Multiethnic Man" usually come in the night, armed with coarse black cloth to carry out their reading of Allah's will. Their target is a bronze nude, cast to leave every doubt as to his race but none about his sex. Italian sculptor Francesco Perilli conceived the statue as a celebration of tolerance.
NEWS
October 20, 1989 | ELAINE KENDALL
Lost in the City of Light by Richard de Combray (Knopf: $17.95; 193 pages.) The engaging, unlikely hero of this compelling novel of romantic obsession is a 30-year-old American expatriate in Paris. A sculptor blessed with a small trust fund and a gift for the language, he's managed to support himself by teaching, broadcasting and translating, staying on even though he suspects that his talent will never develop beyond the technical facility that won him modest early recognition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1987 | ERIC BAILEY, Times Staff Writer
He could step up to a block of wood, chisel and mallet in his bearlike paws, and transform it into something from a dream. Or a nightmare. Those who knew his work called him a modern-day Michelangelo, a sculptor to be reckoned with, admired. Fame, however, eluded Ted Lukjanczyk. True, the artist's bronze bust of Pope John Paul II was displayed for a time in the Vatican library.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1991 | From Associated Press
Sculptor Giacomo Manzu, a leading Italian artist who gained fame as the creator of the bronze doors at St. Peter's Basilica and other churches, has died at 82. Manzu died at his home in a Rome suburb of heart failure Thursday night, said his secretary. Born in the northern city of Bergamo, one of 12 children of a shoemaker, Manzu never received any formal artistic training and used to say that his artistic impulse sprang from his blood.
NEWS
April 1, 1993 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actor Brandon Lee, the 28-year-old son of the late kung fu star Bruce Lee, was killed Wednesday after a small explosive charge used to simulate gunfire went off inside a grocery bag during filming on a movie set in Wilmington, N.C. Lee, who many believed was on the threshold of stardom similar to that attained by his father two decades earlier, had been working on the $14-million movie "The Crow," produced by Edward Pressman and Jeff Most.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1996 | RANDY HARVEY and PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The lingering symbol of the 1984 Los Angeles Olympic Games--the statues of two nude, headless athletes at the peristyle entrance of the Coliseum--will remain undraped during the start of the Olympic torch relay Saturday morning.
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