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NEWS
June 6, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Supreme Court, in a victory for artists and authors, ruled Monday that a homeless-rights group is not the exclusive owner of the copyright to a sculpture it commissioned an artist to create. The 9-0 decision (CCNV vs. Reid, 88-293) ordered further lower court hearings to determine whether the Community for Creative Non-Violence and its founder, Mitch Snyder, may share in the copyright of a work entitled "Third World America," which depicts the plight of the homeless. Justice Thurgood Marshall, writing for the court, said the sculpture is a "work made for hire" and, therefore, its creator, James Earl Reid of Baltimore, must at least share in the copyright.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
Matjames Metson's Silver Lake studio is in a 1930s Art Deco duplex perched atop a steep flight of aging, concrete stairs overlooking a cul-de-sac, which overlooks a hillside, which overlooks a bustling intersection that, from above, appears to be teeming with tiny toy cars and action-figure people. Inside, Metson's dusty, sunlit living room-turned-art studio is also full of tiny treasures. The assemblage artist builds intricate, architectural sculptures, wall hangings and furniture made from his abundant stash of objects, most of which he finds at estate sales.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012 | By Holly Myers
Abraham Cruzvillegas's first exhibition with Regen Projects builds on the story of a Mexican jazz musician - apparently based on the artist's great-uncle - who travels the world playing the trumpet in the height of the swing era. A pachuco who dresses in flamboyant suits with broad lapels and baggy pants, he lands in L.A. in time for the Zoot Suit Riots, drifts through Cab Calloway's New York and the heated clubs of Nazi-occupied Paris. He  gradually crumbles into alcoholism and returns to his native Michoacán.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Good news out of Palm Springs this week: Work has begun on dismantling "Forever Marilyn," the grotesque colossus fabricated with typical ham-handedness by sculptor J. Seward Johnson, which has been marring an already vacant lot at a prominent downtown corner for the last two years. The sculpture is headed out of town by flatbed truck for an exhibition back East. Good news because good riddance. "Forever Marilyn" is a 26-foot-tall leviathan whose claim to notoriety is that it besmirches the memory of a marvelous 1955 movie by the late, great Billy Wilder.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2012 | By David Ng
"Chain Reaction," the anti-nuclear weapons sculpture by the late Paul Conrad, has received landmark status from Santa Monica's Landmarks Commission. The group voted unanimously on the designation late Monday at its monthly meeting. Monday's decision "provides a level of protection for the sculpture, but there are still opportunities [for the city] to relocate it," Scott Albright of the commission said in an interview. He said that future efforts to remove Conrad's sculpture would be reviewed by the commission.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1990
In response to " 'Novel Ideas' Bound by Literal Works" by Cathy Curtis (Calendar, Nov. 16): With all my respect to one of (The Times') most vicious art critics, who knows her stuff very well, I would like to set one very important item in that article straight, which will completely change the distorted and wrong way she reviewed my sculpture "The American Dream." The book I was given was a double paperback by Edward Albee, the author of "Who Is Afraid of Virginia Wolf?" The actual title of the book was "The Zoo Story" and "The American Dream" (two stage plays)
NEWS
July 25, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Marilyn Monroe can't seem to say goodbye to Palm Springs. The 26-foot "Forever Marilyn" statue slated to leave sometime in September will remain in place until mid-November before shoving off for New Jersey, a city tourism site announced. This is the second extension for the  "Forever Marilyn" statue by Seward Johnson, which arrived in May 2012. "The online posts, the many emails, events and celebrations, all have shown the [Sculpture] Foundation and artist Seward Johnson how a community can be inventive and enhance the experience of public art," foundation director Paula Stoeke said in a statement from PS-Resorts.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2012 | By Danielle Paquette
With iPhones and cameras out, crowds virtually stampeded the white concrete path to view Michael Heizer's "Levitated Mass," which opened Sunday morning at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The famously reclusive Heizer was on hand for the opening ceremonies and stood at the exit with LACMA director Michael Govan, shaking hands with museum guests and signing tickets. Govan cut the ribbon with a pair of gold-handled scissors to officially open the $10-million sculpture.
NEWS
September 5, 2013 | By Adam Tschorn
An Aaron Curry sculpture commissioned by Dior Homme artistic director Kris Van Assche has been installed in front of the luxury brand's Rodeo Drive flagship, the label announced Thursday. At the same time, and on the opposite side of the country, the brand took the wraps of another Van Assche-commissioned art installation -- this one by Matt Keegan -- in front of the brand's 57th Street flagship in Manhattan. In the press release unveiling the two new, permanent site-specific installations by contemporary artists, the luxury brand called it "part of an ongoing initiative that aims to enhance Dior Homme's tactile and interactive retail experience ... " The artists' sculptures join existing original works on display in other U.S. Dior Homme locations including a wall sculpture by Robert Montgomery at Dior Homme Soho in Manhattan and a Bruce Weber film at Dior Homme Miami.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
In "Deodorized Central Mass with Satellites" (1991-99), an exceptional installation sculpture made from untidy clusters of plush toys suspended from the ceiling and sleekly lacquered reliefs attached to surrounding walls, the only element that stands on the floor is the viewer. Los Angeles artist Mike Kelley (1954-2012) had a way with upending expectations, and manipulating audiences into his artistic projects was a common gambit. The sculpture, shown in earlier and slightly different iterations in several European venues, is having its West Coast debut at Perry Rubenstein Gallery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2014 | By Rick Rojas
PALM SPRINGS - On a bright and breezy afternoon, the continuous stream of tourists queued up on a bustling downtown corner for their moment with Marilyn. The icon loomed some 26 feet high in a re-creation of that classic image of Monroe in the air-blown white dress. She seemed blissfully oblivious as one person after another posed between her legs, resting a hand on her calf. A few climbed up onto her stilettos. "It's always like this!" Mayor Steve Pougnet said, standing amid the crowd that had assembled on a weekday afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2014 | By David Ng
After years of uncertainty, it appears that the "Chain Reaction" sculpture by Paul Conrad will be saved. The Santa Monica City Council voted on Tuesday to allocate $100,000 in public donations as well as additional city funds to repair the 1991 outdoor sculpture, which had been the subject of debate over its safety. The L.A. Now blog first reported the story late Tuesday. Critics of the anti-nuclear sculpture said that it was unstable and unsafe for the public and that it needed to be removed from its location near the Santa Monica Civic Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Times art critic
The little town of Dixon, Ill., has two claims to fame. First, it's the self-proclaimed Petunia Capital of Illinois. And second, it's the boyhood home of Ronald Reagan, 40th president of the United States. Presidents (and petunias) are no doubt good for tourism, which is probably why the town has decided to erect another bronze statue - its third - to Reagan. This one is planned for Lowell Park, just north of the Dixon Correctional Center, the state's largest medium security facility.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2014 | By Martha Groves
Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Paul Conrad's "Chain Reaction" sculpture in Santa Monica, the subject of a grass-roots preservation campaign, might well survive to remind future generations of the horrors of nuclear war. Now that activists have raised funds to pay for some of the needed upgrades, the city manager said he plans to recommend that the city cover the remaining costs. A City Council vote is scheduled for Feb. 25. Conrad, a three-time Pulitzer winner who died at 86 in 2010, was paid $250,000 by a private donor to sculpt the work.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By David Pagel
Last year, Lorenzo Hurtado Segovia exhibited a series of dazzling abstractions that he had made by shredding works on paper into long, skinny strips and then weaving the strips into place-mat-style paintings that simultaneously evoked digital transmissions on the fritz, plaid fabrics stretched by swinging hips and banners flapping in the wind. This year, in a breakout exhibition at CB1 Gallery, Hurtado Segovia expands the range and intensifies the impact of his ingenious works. Making a mess of distinctions between painting and sculpture, not to mention art and craft, the L.A. artist who was born in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, invites visitors into a world where nothing sits still - least of all, your imagination.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
If you like Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity, you'll love the sculpture of Alexander Calder. And vice versa. As an artist Calder certainly wasn't in the business of illustrating difficult scientific postulates. (Born on the cusp of the 20th century, he died at 78 in 1976.) In fact, one frequent knock on him was the claim that, while charmingly whimsical, his sculpture is physically, emotionally and intellectually lightweight. After all, this is the guy who built an entire miniature circus out of cardboard, some buttons and a bunch of twisted wire.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2013 | By David Ng
A Roy Lichtenstein sculpture will be installed on the grounds of the newly opened Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts in Beverly Hills. The artist's "Coups de Pinceau" (1988) is scheduled to be unveiled Saturday on South Santa Monica Boulevard between North Crescent and North Canon drives. The artwork, which is an artist's proof created posthumously in 2011, is on extended loan from the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation in New York. (An artist's proof is, in this case, a recently created edition of the original conception.)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2012 | By Jamie Wetherbe
A stolen sculpture by British artist Henry Moore valued at $770,000 could end up being sold for scrap, officials have speculated. The 22-inch bronze sundial from 1965 was taken this week from the Henry Moore Foundation, the sculpture's former home-turned-museum in Hertfordshire near London. This is the second time a Moore sculpture has been lifted from the 72-acre property: In 2005 thieves used a crane to steal the 12-foot bronze statue "Reclining Figure," worth an estimated $4.5 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2013 | By Sharon Mizota
With objects as diverse and mundane as kitchen sponges, steel downspouts, T-shirts and garden hoses, Lynn Aldrich has been crafting whimsical sculptures and installations for more than 20 years. Her current exhibition at Art Center College of Design is a delightfully quixotic retrospective in keeping with the eclectic spirit of her work. Visitors are greeted by a rain of steel downspouts, hanging vertically over the entrance to the galleries. Varying in length, their insides are painted in various shades of blue.
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