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HOME & GARDEN
October 5, 2006
AUTUMN'S canvas comes with a different palette here in the West. Instead of the blazing orange of a maple leaf, we have the subdued merlot of a cymbidium bloom. Instead of the electric yellow of a peaking aspen, we have the mellow green of young persimmon. California's fall landscape is different, which is why we asked floral designers to create centerpieces that provide a distinctive alternative to cut flowers in a vase.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2012 | By Don Lee, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - From his gray-brick walled compound in northeast Beijing, Ai Weiwei barely felt the tremors from the Sichuan earthquake on May 12, 2008. But within days, as the death toll mounted into the tens of thousands, many of them children buried under the rubble of shabbily built schools, he found himself standing in the ruins of a town destroyed by the 7.9-magnitude quake. For Ai, it was both heartbreaking and an existential moment that would find expression in his iconoclastic works, leading to clashes with Chinese authorities and catapulting him to status as one of the world's most celebrated artists.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1988 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
The east side of the ever-changing County Museum of Art may still look like a construction site--which it is while the new Pavilion for Japanese Art nears completion--but the southwest corner of the museum grounds is now an island of tranquility. Those who are weary of the upheavals that have accompanied the museum's expansion program will find a respite by simply descending the stairs from the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Sculpture Plaza to the brand-new B. Gerald Cantor Sculpture Garden.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2012 | Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Dennis Avery, who used his share of a family fortune to fund philanthropic ventures around the world and to commission artistic replicas of prehistoric creatures for a quirky sculpture garden in the desert of Borrego Springs, has died. He was 71. Avery died Monday at Sharp Memorial Hospital in San Diego. No cause of death was given. Avery was an heir to the fortune from the Avery Dennison Corp., which launched what is considered the first commercially viable marketing of self-sticking, peel-off labels, the kind of supplies now considered essential for offices, schools and home use. His father, R. Stanton Avery, a classic rags-to-riches American success story, founded the business in 1935 after borrowing $100 to build a label-making machine out of spare parts.
NEWS
December 10, 1987
The City Council and Fine Art Committee will formally dedicate the city's new municipal sculpture garden at 2 p.m. Tuesday, at Beverly Gardens Park on Santa Monica Boulevard between Rodeo and Beverly drives. The garden's inaugural work is "Billboard," by artist Jay Willis. The 6-by-10-by-20-foot piece is fabricated of multicolored anodized aluminum plate.
NEWS
May 2, 1991
The new contemporary sculpture garden at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art will open to the public Sunday. Located directly east of the museum's Wilshire Boulevard entrance, the garden will include nine large-scale outdoor sculptures by Alice Aycock, Ellsworth Kelly, Henry Moore and others. According to a museum official, the centerpiece of the garden is Alexander Calder's three-piece mobile "Hello Girls," commissioned for the museum's opening in 1965.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
A famed outdoor sculpture garden would be protected for at least 50 years under a measure preliminarily approved by Costa Mesa council members this week. The ordinance forces the owners of California Scenario to apply to the council if they want to make changes to the garden, behind an El Torito Grill on Anton Boulevard.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1997 | BARBARA MURPHY
The Sculpture Garden, which opened as a temporary store in The Esplanade mall in Oxnard in November, has moved to an 800-square-foot permanent store between the center court and Sears. Owners Glenn and Jan Kolleda create handmade jewelry and ceramics, fountains, paintings and other artwork with an angel theme. In addition to jewelry and fountains, the Sculpture Garden sells taped music, T-shirts and figurines from such manufacturers as Hummell, the Franklin Mint and Disney.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2000
The City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte will dedicate a new sculpture garden and honor art patron Ernest Lieblich on Saturday. Located next to the facility's visitor center, the garden features works by Charles Arnoldi, Robert Brady, Guy Dill, Seiji Kunishima, Kristan Marvell, Gwynn Murrill, Peter Reginato and Michael Todd. Lieblich, president of FoodCraft Services in Los Angeles, conceived of the garden and financed the purchase of the sculpture. He will be recognized at an 8 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1992 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Public art isn't what it used to be in Beverly Hills, where the weeds of neighborhood discontent started popping up in the municipal sculpture garden soon after it was planted five years ago. The most rank growth was George Herms' "Moon Dial," a thicket of rusty buoys, chains and window frames that outraged nearby residents and was uprooted shortly--very shortly--after the end of its 18-month loan in 1989.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2012 | By David Ng
An unflattering statue of Sarah Palin that doubles as a functioning stove -- yes, the cooking kind -- has found a home in Chicago. The work of public art, created by a Chicago artist named J. Taylor Wallace, will take up residence at the Bridgeport Art Center. "We're havin' a Tea Pear-ody" is a large-scale metallic rendering of Palin's head, with signature glasses, tight bun and mouth wide open as if shouting. Smoke from the stove emerges from the top of the head, according to reports.
HEALTH
September 19, 2011 | By Peggy Stacy, Special to the Los Angeles Times
There was a cake with my mother's name spelled out in buttercream, small gifts and a song. The guests included 20 men and women suffering from Alzheimer's disease and dementia who lived in the secure wing of my mother's new home — a nicely appointed assisted living facility with art on the walls, gentle hands, crafts and music. After my mother started a fire in her hilltop wood-and-glass house, locked her caregiver out of the bathroom and began pushing dollar bills through the paper shredder, my brother and I surrendered to the concept of assisted living.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2011 | Daina Beth Solomon
A few years before he died in 1988, artist Isamu Noguchi established a 24,000-square-foot museum to house representative samples of his seven-decade-long career: paintings, ceramics, furniture, sculptures, landscaping designs and set designs. Noguchi opted to locate the museum in his adopted hometown, New York City. Here on the West Coast, Southern Californians must rely on individual installations to view Noguchi's work. The Laguna Art Museum offers a chance to see a different perspective on Noguchi's accomplishments with "Noguchi: California Legacy," which devotes three compact galleries to a sampling of his work from 1979 to 1986.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2010
The colorful Los Angeles Art Show will have more than 100 international exhibitors, a lecture series and special events. Highlights include a sculpture garden, art exhibits and installations, and a fine art fair that will offer viewing and sales of prints, including antiques and the works of modern masters. L.A. Convention Center, 1201 S. Figueroa St. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. today to Sun. $20. (213) 741-1151. www.laartshow.com.
TRAVEL
October 29, 2006 | Dale M. Brown,, Special to The Times
No, I'm not a taphophile -- someone who loves graveyards and funerals -- but I do admit to enjoying a good cemetery when one comes along: Paris' Pere-Lachaise, where everyone from Georges Bizet to Jim Morrison lies buried, or Moscow's Novodevichy, with its fenced-in plots and Communist-era headstones. But if I were to name a new favorite, it would be Staglieno, in Genoa, Italy.
HOME & GARDEN
October 5, 2006
AUTUMN'S canvas comes with a different palette here in the West. Instead of the blazing orange of a maple leaf, we have the subdued merlot of a cymbidium bloom. Instead of the electric yellow of a peaking aspen, we have the mellow green of young persimmon. California's fall landscape is different, which is why we asked floral designers to create centerpieces that provide a distinctive alternative to cut flowers in a vase.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1992
When a news story pleases neither side of a contentious issue, journalists take it as a sign that the story was balanced. That same folk wisdom could be applied to the recent decision by the San Diego Planning Commission regarding the Museum of Contemporary Art in La Jolla. Neither side was happy with the decision to allow the museum to enclose its oceanfront sculpture garden or the condition that the garden remain open to the public, without paying admission, during museum hours.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2003 | Massie Ritsch, Times Staff Writer
Nine years after the Northridge earthquake devastated its campus, Cal State Northridge has merged twisted rebar and buckled concrete into a garden that honors the power of nature and the determination of humans. The Lauretta Wasserstein Earthquake Sculpture Garden -- named for a late faculty member -- weaves native grasses and other plants into pieces of a campus parking structure that imploded during the 6.7-magnitude quake in 1994.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2006 | Arin Gencer, Times Staff Writer
On and off for 25 years, siblings Lew and Dianne Harris have worked to turn the frontyard of their South Los Angeles home into what they call the "10th Wonder of the World." And a wonder it is. Industrial steel pipes, painted black, tower in front of the house, topped with vents painted red. Small, bright red tubes dangle inside spheres fashioned from steel, mimicking the fire in Earth's core.
TRAVEL
October 2, 2005 | Maggie Barnett, Times Staff Writer
RAMBLE through the gardens, vineyards and parks of New Zealand on a three-week tour that begins Jan. 7. The tour, which focuses mainly on gardens, will include stops from Auckland to Christchurch. Participants will meet the people who planted the gardens. "It's not just looking at plants," said landscape architect and tour leader Richard Lyon. "The garden without the gardener doesn't make sense."
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