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August 9, 1997 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerry Rothman climbed atop his bird-like sculpture and rocked it. The demonstration may have looked like performance art, but it was more of a chemistry lesson. "If this were made of regular clay, firing would have made it shrink and crack on its steel armature," he said proudly. "This didn't." Rothman developed so-called ferro-ceramic some 24 years ago. The mix of clay and inorganic particles isn't exactly romantic or revolutionary-sounding in this high-tech era.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1997 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerry Rothman climbed atop his bird-like sculpture and rocked it. The demonstration may have looked like performance art, but it was more of a chemistry lesson. "If this were made of regular clay, firing would have made it shrink and crack on its steel armature," he said proudly. "This didn't." Rothman developed so-called ferro-ceramic some 24 years ago. The mix of clay and inorganic particles isn't exactly romantic or revolutionary-sounding in this high-tech era.
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MAGAZINE
July 10, 1988 | JUDITH SIMS
TURNED WOOD USUALLY conjures up images of chair legs and banisters: sticks of wood that have been rotated by a machine while a human holds a cutting tool at a precise angle and depth. But in the hands of an artisan, simple chair legs give way to objects of surpassing beauty and occasional practicality--bowls, boxes and sculpture. The history of the lathe is shrouded in early mist.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1992 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The J. Paul Getty Museum's archaic Greek kouros is in the spotlight again. The authenticity of the 6-foot, 8-inch-tall marble sculpture of a nude young man has been questioned since 1985, when the museum bought the kouros for an undisclosed sum, variously reported at up to $12 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1985 | JOSINE IANCO-STARRELS
The 10 recipients of this year's Awards in the Visual Arts, chosen to represent 10 different areas of the nation, include Allen Ruppersberg of Santa Monica from the California and Hawaii region. To be eligible for an award, the artist must be nominated and selected by a network of 100 art professionals. The winners were chosen from 500 candidates. A five-member jury then reviewed about 5,000 slides and 16 videotapes, selecting one winner from each region.
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