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NEWS
March 5, 2013 | By Jay Jones
One of the world's largest sellers of Lladró porcelain, Regis Galerie in Las Vegas, is inviting shoppers to meet the company president this weekend. Rosa Lladró, the daughter of one of the founders, will be autographing sculptures from 2-4 p.m. on Sunday, March 10. The gallery, in the Grand Canal Shoppes at the Venetian, is known for its broad range of art collectibles bearing names such as Daum, Faberge and Lalique. Buyers often acquire pieces with the expectation that they will increase in value, and signed pieces often are worth more.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
Matjames Metson's Silver Lake studio is in a 1930s Art Deco duplex perched atop a steep flight of aging, concrete stairs overlooking a cul-de-sac, which overlooks a hillside, which overlooks a bustling intersection that, from above, appears to be teeming with tiny toy cars and action-figure people. Inside, Metson's dusty, sunlit living room-turned-art studio is also full of tiny treasures. The assemblage artist builds intricate, architectural sculptures, wall hangings and furniture made from his abundant stash of objects, most of which he finds at estate sales.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2012 | By David Pagel
Kathy Butterly does for sculpture what digital technology does for information: pack so much into such small spaces that it's impossible to reconcile an object's literal dimensions with the kicks it delivers. Size matters, but not like it used to. Think of what Butterly does as the microscopic sublime. Intimately and gently, she blows your mind, time after time, and never the same way.  At Shoshana Wayne Gallery, “Lots of Little Love Affairs” consists of 15 tabletop sculptures the New York artist has made over the last 18 months.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By David Pagel
Elliott Hundley's new paintings and sculptures are more muscular and skeletal than anything the 38-year-old artist has exhibited since his first solo show in 2006. They're also stranger and sexier, their boldness ennobled by an embrace of abstraction that leaves lots to the imagination and nothing to chance. In the past, a jittery wantonness suffused Hundley's art. Most of his works were made of thousands of cut-up photographs pasted and pinned into messy maelstroms of prickly energy.
NEWS
July 24, 2013 | By Carren Jao
A glowing red elephant, two blue-green oxen and an orange and pink camel trudge beside passengers as they exit the Los Angeles International Airport's Tom Bradley Terminal. Closer inspection of the life-size sculptures reveals the elephant's trunk to be a vacuum cleaner hose, an ox's yoke to be the handle of a baby carrier and the camel's hump to be a mixing bowl. These are just some of Los Angeles sculptor Cynthia Minet's raw materials, which when lighted by LEDs, suddenly take on an arresting glow.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2010 | By Scarlet Cheng, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Standing in a forest of sinuous, black totems spiraling into the lofty heights of the main room at Ace Gallery Beverly Hills, Herb Alpert is surrounded by an art form he has practiced for the last two decades — sculpture. By his account and that of those who know him, he's a man who lives on the right side of his brain — he percolates on the creative and the intuitive. "I do something every day, whether sculpting or painting," he says. "It definitely feeds my spirit when I sculpt or paint or blow the horn, that's an essential part of my being."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
The dozen ceramic anvils on sawhorse and plywood tables at Acme are signature Matthias Merkel Hess: at once subversive and reverential, sly but earnest, gently comical, surprisingly beautiful and unexpectedly poetic. Merkel Hess has transformed a range of functional objects into clay, in the process generally canceling out their functionality. His buckets and other containers can still serve as vessels, but heavy and fragile ones compared with their lightweight, indestructible plastic models.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2012 | By David Pagel
It doesn't take long for the grandmotherly calm that wafts around Ruby Neri's roomful of figurative sculptures to settle over visitors to her exhibition at David Kordansky Gallery. The feeling is strange - oddly disarming and terrifically distinct from business as usual when it comes to contemporary art, which gets far more attention for being snide than for eliciting such human sympathies as affection, fondness and love. Not one of Neri's 15 sculptures, nearly all of which are about 6 feet tall, is especially realistic.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
Otherness and psychic disorientation have long been fertile themes for Blue McRight, and never more so than in her newest body of work at Samuel Freeman. Based in L.A., McRight spreads her energies across multiple media -- painting, sculpture, installation and public art -- and her work's emotional spectrum stretches as well, from whimsical to tantalizingly dark. The darker, the more heft and mystery. In her last show at Freeman in 2009, McRight let loose a flock of black, bandage- and thread-wrapped bird figurines in a side gallery, infusing the space with a haunting, spectral presence.
NEWS
April 13, 2011
These sculptures, photographed by Times reader Eric Davidoff, adorn the rooftop of La Pedrera, an apartment complex in Barcelona. The dreamlike quality of these figures matches the surreal look of the building itself. Catalan architect Antoni Gaudi, known for his whimsical creations, designed La Pedrera. You can find La Pedrera on Paseo de Gracia in Barcelona. Other Gaudi creations in Barcelona include La Sagrada Familia, a cathedral more than a century  in the making, and Park Guell.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Good news out of Palm Springs this week: Work has begun on dismantling "Forever Marilyn," the grotesque colossus fabricated with typical ham-handedness by sculptor J. Seward Johnson, which has been marring an already vacant lot at a prominent downtown corner for the last two years. The sculpture is headed out of town by flatbed truck for an exhibition back East. Good news because good riddance. "Forever Marilyn" is a 26-foot-tall leviathan whose claim to notoriety is that it besmirches the memory of a marvelous 1955 movie by the late, great Billy Wilder.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By David Pagel
The dark side of childhood may not be something adults like to think about. But it takes haunting shape in Yoshitomo Nara's wide-ranging exhibition at Blum & Poe, its presence all the more potent for being subdued. In 11 new paintings, 10 recent sculptures and more than 200 drawings made over the last 30 years, Nara treats children as complex creatures whose inner lives are as rich as anyone's and far more mysterious than adults usually treat them. The 54-year-old artist's bronze sculptures are big lumpy heads.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2014 | By Rick Rojas
PALM SPRINGS - On a bright and breezy afternoon, the continuous stream of tourists queued up on a bustling downtown corner for their moment with Marilyn. The icon loomed some 26 feet high in a re-creation of that classic image of Monroe in the air-blown white dress. She seemed blissfully oblivious as one person after another posed between her legs, resting a hand on her calf. A few climbed up onto her stilettos. "It's always like this!" Mayor Steve Pougnet said, standing amid the crowd that had assembled on a weekday afternoon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2014 | By Martha Groves
"Chain Reaction" lives. After years of uncertainty over the anti-nuclear war sculpture's fate, the Santa Monica City Council voted 6 to 1 on Tuesday night to use more than $100,000 in public donations and to provide city funds to cover the rest of the cost of refurbishing the towering work near the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium. Designed by Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Paul Conrad and completed in 1991, the piece is made of tangled chains in the shape of a mushroom cloud.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Times art critic
The little town of Dixon, Ill., has two claims to fame. First, it's the self-proclaimed Petunia Capital of Illinois. And second, it's the boyhood home of Ronald Reagan, 40th president of the United States. Presidents (and petunias) are no doubt good for tourism, which is probably why the town has decided to erect another bronze statue - its third - to Reagan. This one is planned for Lowell Park, just north of the Dixon Correctional Center, the state's largest medium security facility.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Times art critic
If a sculptor is going to make paintings, then ceramics seem to be the way to go. That, at least, is the loopy lesson from Liz Larner's eccentrically engaging exhibition of recent work at Regen Projects. The show also includes more traditional freestanding sculptures, including a large, highly polished “X” of cast stainless steel that seems poised to leap into the air like a giant, agitated water bug. Nearby, a billowy black form looks like the tail of a leaping whale paired with its mirror reflection in water.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1986 | HILLIARD HARPER, San Diego County Arts Writer
Situated where mountain, sea and sky abruptly meet at the westernmost tip of this city, Eduardo Chillida's sculpture "Wind Combs" stands as an eloquent statement of the war between the elements and the artist's vision. The three sets of huge steel prongs that comprise the sculpture are situated so that an almost palpable tension ebbs and flows among them. Although others have built larger sculptures, few have made such articulate use of such a large space.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1989 | Dave Lewinson
The fifth manifestation of the Ilan-Lael Foundation's annual juried sculpture competition, currently on view at the Lyceum Theatre in Horton Plaza, presents a combination of highlights and low-lights typical of such exhibitions. The resulting impression created by the 44 works by 22 San Diegans, plus several more pieces by guest artist Guillermo Castano of Tijuana, rises only slightly above mediocrity. This is especially disappointing considering the estimable ambitions of the foundation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2014 | By Martha Groves
Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Paul Conrad's "Chain Reaction" sculpture in Santa Monica, the subject of a grass-roots preservation campaign, might well survive to remind future generations of the horrors of nuclear war. Now that activists have raised funds to pay for some of the needed upgrades, the city manager said he plans to recommend that the city cover the remaining costs. A City Council vote is scheduled for Feb. 25. Conrad, a three-time Pulitzer winner who died at 86 in 2010, was paid $250,000 by a private donor to sculpt the work.
HOME & GARDEN
December 14, 2013 | Chris Erskine
Christmas makes old men of us all, particularly the women, who grow grumpy and put-upon because most of the holiday prep falls to them. Christmas is a glorious celebration till it gets its claws into you. If you're not too careful, you grow cynical over the drumbeat of sales-sales-sales, the idiot radio stations that start the yuletide tunes in mid-November, the whole colossal runaway holiday sled. Our Thanksgiving was a triumph of the human spirit, and by Sunday of that weekend I was nearly Christmased out. I'd had just the right amount, yet there stood before us several more weeks of holiday mayhem.
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