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ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
A waxwork of Kim Kardashian was unveiled Wednesday in Los Angeles - and not at Madame Tussauds. On display at LAB ART Gallery, artist Daniel Edwards' “L.A. Fertility” depicts the pregnant reality star in the nude. The lifesize sculpture features “lactiferous breasts” and a “voluminous” belly “to entice visitors to give a respectful rub for good luck and success,” according to a release from the artist. PHOTOS: Celebrities by The Times “I was inspired by the beauty of Kim Kardashian and felt quite put-off by the media's criticism of her weight gain during pregnancy,” Edwards said in a statement.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
The world's largest Lego model, an X-wing starfighter, has landed in Times Square with enough cockpit space for Luke Skywalker. The life-size model weighs 46,000 pounds and spans 43 feet from tip to tale, which is about the size of the ship Skywalker flew to battle Darth Vader in “Star Wars.” Thirty-two people, dubbed “master builders” by Lego, spent 17,000 hours assembling more than 5 million bricks to make the model at the company's headquarters...
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Collages with the material heft of sculptures and sculptures with the two-dimensional articulation of flat drawings characterize Florian Morlat's engagingly strange show at Cherry and Martin. (The show is the first of a two-part exhibition, the second installment opening June 8.) The palette is dominated by the red-black-white seriousness of Constructivist art, with its early 20th century emphasis on theory in service of productive revolution, while the gawky eccentricity of the forms is more in keeping with the tactile seductions of participatory sculpture by the late Franz West.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
In the desert, Nicolas Shake piles up old tires, dried palm fronds, mounds of dirt, wooden pallets, old car parts and other stuff scavenged from remote roadsides then decorates them with colored lights. As night falls the makeshift, temporary sculptures are photographed, the resulting prints becoming permanent records of an ephemeral art. In Shake's five photographs at Western Project, the slow slide between daylight and darkness underscores the transitory nature of the subject, which is an art conceived as something with a fragile life span rather than being timeless or eternal.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
Frank Gehry has pulled out of a major architecture exhibition set to open June 2 at the Museum of Contemporary Art, a move that could force the show to find a new venue or face the prospect of being canceled altogether. The exhibition, "A New Sculpturalism: Contemporary Architecture From Southern California," is an exploration of the last 25 years of Los Angeles architecture, with work by Gehry, Thom Mayne, Michael Maltzan, Barbara Bestor, Lorcan O'Herlihy and many younger architects.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2013 | By David Pagel
Making fun of others is often amusing. But being able to laugh at yourself is even better. You don't have to worry about other people's feelings because yours are sufficiently multilayered: an ambivalent mixture of first impressions, second thoughts and emotional turbulence - spiked by the ability not to take yourself too seriously. At Perry Rubenstein Gallery, Georg Herold's new works embody the characteristics of selves who are comfortable in their own skins. In making fun of themselves, his sculptures and paintings leave us free to think for ourselves, playfully and provocatively.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2013 | By David Pagel
Tostep into “Sheep's Head,” Matt Wedel's magnificent exhibition at L.A. Louver, is to feel as if you have fallen, like Alice, through the looking glass. Just inside the entrance stands a 10-foot-tall lamb with a human head that's too big for its body. Made of gorgeously glazed ceramic, the massive icon stares off in three-quarter profile, dwarfing visitors while reminding us what life looked like when we were  3 feet tall: bigger and better than it does now, our experiences of its highs and lows filled with more innocent intensity than we can remember, much less recapture.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Edouard Manet (1832-83) was arguably the first Modern artist. Partly that's because the 19th century painter's work was made in direct, conscious response to museum art - in those days a newfangled institution. Before, painters and sculptors made art in response to popes, kings and burghers as well as to paintings and sculptures other artists made for popes, kings and burghers. But the museum was something new. The museum codified art and its history. Manet painted in the self-conscious hope of gaining admission to the ranks.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2013 | By David Pagel
Over the last 10 years, Kaz Oshiro has used the materials of painting (paint, canvas and stretcher bars) to make sculptures that resemble ordinary things (crates, cabinets and cardboard boxes). At Honor Fraser Gallery, he continues to play with perceptions and mess with expectations. Titled “Still Life,” his gently subversive exhibition throws a kink into the mix of what we think of as business as usual. What appear to be three file cabinets stand against the walls in two galleries.
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