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Se Ri Pak

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August 5, 1998 | TIM KAWAKAMI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were five weeks that shook the world of women's golf, and pretty much wiped out the wondrous 20-year-old who did all the shaking and rousing record-breaking. By the time rookie Se Ri Pak brought her sweet swing and her legions of fans here last week for the du Maurier Classic, the LPGA Tour's final major tournament, she was a frail shell of her recently dominant self.
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SPORTS
April 3, 2014 | By Jim Peltz
To hear Shanshan Feng tell it, the Chinese golfer had the good fortune to be paired with Amy Alcott in Thursday's opening round of the Kraft Nabisco Championship. Alcott, 58, is the LPGA Hall of Famer who won the Kraft Nabisco Championship, one of the LPGA's five major events, three times, in 1983, '88 and '91. So Feng said she asked Alcott on the first hole, "Can you tell me the secrets about winning here?" Feng declined to reveal Alcott's answers, but whatever she said helped Feng earn the tournament's first-round lead with a six-under-par 66 at Mission Hills Country Club in Rancho Mirage.
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SPORTS
October 29, 1998 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there is one thing you have to give the LPGA credit for, it's this sort of surprise-package mentality it keeps bringing to the party every two years, almost as though somebody's checking the calendar or something. This can no longer be surprising, not the way things have been going lately, so we probably should get used to it.
SPORTS
June 10, 2004 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
When Se Ri Pak arrived in the United States in 1998 to play professional golf, she hardly appeared the revolutionary. Only 20 years old, she traveled with her parents and spoke little English, learning the language by watching cartoons and movies. At the time, there was not a single South Korean-born player on the LPGA Tour, home of the best female golfers in the world. But Pak was an instant success, winning four tournaments in her rookie season, including two major championships.
SPORTS
April 4, 2003 | Peter Yoon, Times Staff Writer
One of these years Se Ri Pak is going to break out in a big way. Since her arrival on the LPGA tour in 1998, Pak has shown in spurts that she has the ability to dominate the tour the way Annika Sorenstam has for the last two years. Pak won five times in 2001 and five more in 2002, winning major championships each year. Nothing to sneeze at, but Sorenstam has 19 victories over the same span. Still, you get the feeling this might be the year.
SPORTS
June 10, 2004 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
When Se Ri Pak arrived in the United States in 1998 to play professional golf, she hardly appeared the revolutionary. Only 20 years old, she traveled with her parents and spoke little English, learning the language by watching cartoons and movies. At the time, there was not a single South Korean-born player on the LPGA Tour, home of the best female golfers in the world. But Pak was an instant success, winning four tournaments in her rookie season, including two major championships.
SPORTS
July 7, 1998 | LIZ CLARKE, WASHINGTON POST
After their 18-hole playoff Monday failed to produce a champion for the 53rd U.S. Women's Open, the two 20-year-old golfers persevered, still tied at two-over-par 73. Then the five-hour odyssey that took South Korea's Se Ri Pak shin-deep in water and forced Duke University amateur Jenny Chuasiriporn waist-high in weeds ended on the second hole of the first sudden-death playoff in tournament history.
SPORTS
July 19, 1998 | STEVE JACOBSON, NEWSDAY
The treasured present of Nancy Lopez and the breathtaking future of Se Ri Pak had just come off the Wykagyl course after the first round of the JAL Big Apple Classic Thursday when a South Korean correspondent expressed the question for a whole new world of golf. "Do you think," he asked Lopez with all due respect, "she can compare to you?" Lopez, the graceful lady at 41, said in all courtesy: "She represents our tour well. She's a great player already. But it's kinda early to ask that."
SPORTS
July 7, 1998 | From Associated Press
Se Ri Pak finally showed some emotion when she became the youngest U.S. Women's Open champion in history. The 20-year-old from South Korea pumped her fists and jumped into her father's arms Monday after her 18-foot birdie on the 20th extra hole finally put away amateur Jenny Chuasiriporn. It was the longest Women's Open in history and it ended with the youngest champion in 53 editions of the biggest event in women's golf.
SPORTS
April 3, 2014 | By Jim Peltz
To hear Shanshan Feng tell it, the Chinese golfer had the good fortune to be paired with Amy Alcott in Thursday's opening round of the Kraft Nabisco Championship. Alcott, 58, is the LPGA Hall of Famer who won the Kraft Nabisco Championship, one of the LPGA's five major events, three times, in 1983, '88 and '91. So Feng said she asked Alcott on the first hole, "Can you tell me the secrets about winning here?" Feng declined to reveal Alcott's answers, but whatever she said helped Feng earn the tournament's first-round lead with a six-under-par 66 at Mission Hills Country Club in Rancho Mirage.
SPORTS
April 4, 2003 | Peter Yoon, Times Staff Writer
One of these years Se Ri Pak is going to break out in a big way. Since her arrival on the LPGA tour in 1998, Pak has shown in spurts that she has the ability to dominate the tour the way Annika Sorenstam has for the last two years. Pak won five times in 2001 and five more in 2002, winning major championships each year. Nothing to sneeze at, but Sorenstam has 19 victories over the same span. Still, you get the feeling this might be the year.
SPORTS
October 29, 1998 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there is one thing you have to give the LPGA credit for, it's this sort of surprise-package mentality it keeps bringing to the party every two years, almost as though somebody's checking the calendar or something. This can no longer be surprising, not the way things have been going lately, so we probably should get used to it.
SPORTS
August 5, 1998 | TIM KAWAKAMI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were five weeks that shook the world of women's golf, and pretty much wiped out the wondrous 20-year-old who did all the shaking and rousing record-breaking. By the time rookie Se Ri Pak brought her sweet swing and her legions of fans here last week for the du Maurier Classic, the LPGA Tour's final major tournament, she was a frail shell of her recently dominant self.
SPORTS
July 19, 1998 | STEVE JACOBSON, NEWSDAY
The treasured present of Nancy Lopez and the breathtaking future of Se Ri Pak had just come off the Wykagyl course after the first round of the JAL Big Apple Classic Thursday when a South Korean correspondent expressed the question for a whole new world of golf. "Do you think," he asked Lopez with all due respect, "she can compare to you?" Lopez, the graceful lady at 41, said in all courtesy: "She represents our tour well. She's a great player already. But it's kinda early to ask that."
SPORTS
July 7, 1998 | From Associated Press
Se Ri Pak finally showed some emotion when she became the youngest U.S. Women's Open champion in history. The 20-year-old from South Korea pumped her fists and jumped into her father's arms Monday after her 18-foot birdie on the 20th extra hole finally put away amateur Jenny Chuasiriporn. It was the longest Women's Open in history and it ended with the youngest champion in 53 editions of the biggest event in women's golf.
SPORTS
July 7, 1998 | LIZ CLARKE, WASHINGTON POST
After their 18-hole playoff Monday failed to produce a champion for the 53rd U.S. Women's Open, the two 20-year-old golfers persevered, still tied at two-over-par 73. Then the five-hour odyssey that took South Korea's Se Ri Pak shin-deep in water and forced Duke University amateur Jenny Chuasiriporn waist-high in weeds ended on the second hole of the first sudden-death playoff in tournament history.
SPORTS
April 6, 2002
*--* Office Depot Championship Par 72 (36-36) Top golfers after first round: Se Ri Pak 34-34--68 -4 Tonya Gill 35-34--69 -3 Wendy Doolan 36-33--69 -3 Kristal Parker-Manzo 35-35--70 -2 Dawn Coe-Jones 35-35--70 -2 Complete scores...D12 *--*
SPORTS
May 24, 2001 | Thomas Bonk
The top five choices to win next week's U.S. Women's Open: 1. Annika Sorenstam (Why not? She's winning everything else.) 2. Se Ri Pak (Ranks in top five in greens in regulation and scoring average.) 3. Grace Park (Tied for eighth and tied for sixth in last two Opens.) 4. Dottie Pepper (Ranks second in putting stats.) 5. Karrie Webb (You have to like anyone who thought "Survivor" was phony.)
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