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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1990 | KIRSTEN LEE SWARTZ
Raising babies can be stressful. Consider the adult Western gull. When chicks want to eat they peck at a red mark on one of their parents' bills until mom or dad regurgitates a meal. "It is kind of fun to go out to Anacapa Island and watch them do that," said Jean Van Tatenhove, a ranger for Channel Islands National Park. "It's a little gross, but it's fun too."
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NEWS
April 18, 2012 | By Russ Parsons, Los Angeles Times Food editor
The tiny island of Kauai is full of beautiful spots - the mountains above Hanalei, the taro fields between there and Princeville, just about any beach you can name - but my favorite spot may be Kilauea Lighthouse . Jutting out into the Pacific on the verdant northeastern side of the island, the 1913 lighthouse boasts one of the largest clamshell Fresnel lenses ever made - 4 tons of illuminated fun. But that's important...
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NEWS
December 27, 1988
The toll of sea birds coated with oil spilled from a damaged barge near Ocean Shores, Wash., has topped 1,100 and rescue workers expect more as the week goes on. Pam Miller, a biologist for the state Department of Ecology, said 300 gulls, murres, grebes and scoters--their feathers and skin suffocated by the gooey, tar-like oil--have died.
OPINION
March 9, 2012
For the birds Re " Seabird rescues up sharply ," March 7 So, oil seeping naturally from the ocean floor off Santa Barbara is to blame for all these oil-soaked birds. I have a hard time believing that's all there is to it. Oil companies have drilled many a hole into the sea floor over the last 60-plus years and have sucked out many millions of barrels of crude. Surely that wouldn't have anything to do with leaks? Growing up in Long Beach and surfing Bolsa Chica in the early 1960s, I got used to cleaning tar off my feet, but it seemed that Huntington was as far south as the oil drifted back then.
NEWS
October 16, 1994 | VICTORIA BRETT, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Atlantic Puffins casually mill about this rocky island, looking like clowns in tuxedos too content to notice the dozens of tourists who have boated out to see them. But life hasn't always been easy for these quirky birds--sometimes called sea parrots--on the islands off the coast of Maine. Maine's puffins were nearly wiped out by hunters a century ago. But they're returning in record numbers, thanks to an innovative restoration effort by the National Audubon Society.
NEWS
September 1, 1992 | DIANNE KLEIN
"You never believe something like this would go on in a neighborhood," Ed Beveridge is saying, trying to remain calm, but frankly he is getting rather worked up. He is repeating himself, talking about his "main beefs" and lots of other ones too, like the rooster that used to live next door to him here in otherwise zealously suburban Laguna Niguel. But I've told him that, really, I am not here about the roosters. Ed's next-door neighbor already told me about the roosters. Ed knows this.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1995
What triggered the real-life outburst of crazed sea birds that partly inspired the 1963 Alfred Hitchcock thriller, "The Birds"? UC Santa Cruz biologist David Garrison suggests that in 1961, gulls and other sea birds in Monterey Bay suddenly went berserk--nipping several people--after eating a natural toxin found in plankton. Hitchcock, then in nearby Scotts Valley, read about the incident in a newspaper.
NEWS
November 22, 1987
In the wake of the mutilations of nine sea gulls and three pelicans in the Half Moon Bay area, the Peninsula Humane Society has donated more than $5,000 to help catch those responsible for the attacks. During the last few weeks, officials said, the sea birds have been found on the beach with their beaks chopped off. Because the beakless birds cannot eat or drink, they have been destroyed to spare them from starving to death, officials said.
SCIENCE
July 16, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sea birds can spread pollutants such as mercury and pesticides across the Arctic in their droppings, Canadian researchers reported in the current issue of the journal Science. The finding surprised experts, who had presumed that the chemicals were being spread only by atmospheric winds. The birds eat fish, squid and other animals with chemicals in their bodies. The chemicals are concentrated further in the bodies of the birds.
NEWS
January 25, 1987
More than 30 miles of beaches on Oahu, the most heavily populated island in Hawaii, have been polluted by a spreading oil spill, authorities said. "The ocean current is sweeping it around the island and taking it north," said Coast Guard pollution inspector Richard Vlaun. "It has affected an awful lot of beach." Six beaches on the island posted signs warning beachgoers of the pollution. Sea birds were also reported covered with oil.
NATIONAL
May 19, 2010 | By Raja Abdulrahim and Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
In a region teeming with wildlife, so far there have been few signs of significant animal die-offs attributed to the Gulf of Mexico oil spill. Scientists offered one explanation for this puzzle Thursday: Birds and marine life that spend most of their lives at sea are likely being killed by the oil, but are dying far offshore. "If birds are impacted by oil and they die there, they sink," said Roger Helm, chief of environmental quality for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
TRAVEL
January 31, 2010
IMPERIAL, CALIF. Salton Sea International Bird Festival When, where: Feb. 11-14, Imperial Valley College plus various field locations Highlights: See as many as 100 bird species a day at the Salton Sea and the Pacific Flyway. Events include a marsh bird symposium, expert-led tours, seminars, workshops and a learning area for children. Cost: $100 for all scheduled events, or $25 to $50 per event Info: www.newriverwetlands .com/saltonsea2010.
SCIENCE
July 16, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sea birds can spread pollutants such as mercury and pesticides across the Arctic in their droppings, Canadian researchers reported in the current issue of the journal Science. The finding surprised experts, who had presumed that the chemicals were being spread only by atmospheric winds. The birds eat fish, squid and other animals with chemicals in their bodies. The chemicals are concentrated further in the bodies of the birds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2004 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Avian experts are trying to determine why an unusually high number of California brown pelicans are washing up on local shores -- weak, dehydrated and near death. Tissue samples from birds that have died have been sent to laboratories run by the state and federal governments and the UC Davis veterinary school. The young birds, members of an endangered species, are being treated by bird specialists at Sea World San Diego. More than 100 birds have been brought to the park in the last two weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1999
After sunset during fishing season, boats searching for squid prowl the coast, guided by banks of lights that illuminate the sea like a baseball stadium and lure the little luminescent animals to the surface. The lights are so intense, according to local lore, that you can read a newspaper at midnight five miles away on Anacapa Island. But squid may not be the only creatures at risk.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1997 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawyers in a Santa Ana courtroom today will retrace events surrounding the infamous 1990 American Trader tanker spill, which fouled 15 miles of beaches and is known as one of Orange County's worst environmental disasters of recent times. Opening statements are expected this morning in a major civil suit launched by state and local governments seeking compensation for the damage caused Feb. 7, 1990, when the tanker ran aground off Huntington Beach and ruptured on its anchor.
NEWS
January 1, 1989 | United Press International
In its first official estimate, the Coast Guard said Saturday that at least 168,000 gallons of heavy black crude oil leaked from a ruptured barge last week, soiling 150 miles of Washington beaches and killing more than 2,000 sea birds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1995
The proposal by the Navy to fly high-performance aircraft targeting a naval building that is adjacent to the beach communities of Silver Strand, Hollywood-by-the-Sea and Hollywood Beach has not been adequately addressed by our representative in Congress nor by the members of the Board of Supervisors of Ventura County. The Navy plans to fly high-performance aircraft at 325 knots, 100 feet above the water, that will turn north approximately one mile offshore. Many sea birds, including pelicans, also fly at 100 feet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1995 | Compiled from Times Staff and Wire Reports
What triggered the real-life outburst of crazed sea birds that partly inspired the 1963 Alfred Hitchcock thriller, "The Birds"? UC Santa Cruz biologist David Garrison suggests that in 1961, gulls and other sea birds in Monterey Bay suddenly went berserk--nipping several people--after eating a natural toxin found in plankton. Hitchcock, then in nearby Scotts Valley, read about the incident in a newspaper. The toxin, called domoic acid, is known to cause disorientation, violent spasms and death, and it can accumulate in the flesh of plankton-eating fish.
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