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Sea Gulls

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1997 | CARLOS V. LOZANO
Santa Paula Airport officials complained Tuesday that the Toland Road Landfill expansion has attracted increasing numbers of sea gulls to the area, citing one instance in which a bird smashed through a private plane's windshield as the aircraft was attempting to land. Bruce Dickenson, a member of the airport association's board of directors, showed up at the county Board of Supervisors' meeting Tuesday, holding a piece of the broken windshield.
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SCIENCE
April 24, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Consider the baby sea turtle: Just a few inches long, it emerges from its sandy nest and, using the moon as its compass, runs down the sandy beach away from its many predators and into the relative safety of the ocean surf. The faster these little guys run, the more likely they will survive sea gulls, crabs, snakes, rats and a long list of other animals waiting to eat them. And so, these primarily aquatic animals have developed mechanisms that allow them to move at speeds of several body lengths per second on both sandy and firm terrain.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1991
I haven't written a letter to you regarding the abortion issue. Reagan and Bush have their agenda, and I'll let it go at that. But for heaven's sake, how restrictive are we to become? According to the article "Environmental Group Cites Landfill's AIDS Threat" (June 11), people now are faulting even the use of used condoms by the sea gulls. I feel it is a pretty sad state of affairs that the gulls have to resort to the use of used condoms in the first place, but is anybody addressing that concern?
SPORTS
August 12, 2011 | Grahame L. Jones, On Soccer
Sea gulls, snails, bikinis and diamonds. You have to wonder what the good folk in Sheffield, England, would have thought of soccer today. It wasn't anything like this when they drew up the rules of the sport 153 years ago. Certainly, Victorian eyebrows would have been raised to record highs. Speaking of which, among the summer's many odd and unusual happenings on and off the pitch was the sale at auction in London of soccer's original rule book. The handwritten tome was penned in 1858 by the founders of Sheffield FC, the world's oldest soccer club.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1995
I am a student at Santa Clara School. Why should the Ventura Regional Sanitation District expand Toland Road Landfill 1.25 miles away from a school, especially a historical landmark? Dump trucks let off particulates. We could breathe in those particulates and we could get very sick or get cancer. A lot of sea gulls will come to eat the scraps of leftover food. They'll probably come in swarms of 20 to 30 sea gulls. There will be lots of noise. There also might be lots and lots of smog.
SPORTS
June 23, 1987 | Scott Ostler
Old age is a terrible thing. It sneaks up on you while you're least expecting it. It crept up on both Martina Navratilova and Chris Evert last week in a nice little English town named Eastbourne. The news was carried by a brass band and a sea gull. In a Wimbledon warmup tournament in Eastbourne, an event most players take very seriously, Evert lost to a Czech kid named Helena Sukova.
NEWS
February 20, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Canadian government, facing angry protests from bird lovers, has postponed a plan to poison sea gulls on remote Sable Island, 170 miles off Nova Scotia, a wildlife agency spokesman said. The government decided last year to kill the gulls because they threatened the endangered roseate tern, a smaller sea bird. Sea gulls feed on the tern's eggs and compete with it for food.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1991 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In addition to other concerns over a proposed landfill near Ojai, an environmental group has raised the specter that sea gulls might be able to spread AIDS by carrying used condoms from the dump to nearby neighborhoods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2002 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Don't run. Shuffle your feet," the naturalist tells the fifth-graders. That's a tall order for 10- and 11-year-olds who have been cooped up on a boat and are ready to scamper up the trails on this wind-swept island. When they round the first bend, all of the rules make sense. Baby sea gulls are everywhere. Nests pop up every 20 feet. Clueless chicks, camouflaged by downy, mottled black and tan feathers, wander in every direction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1993 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the "you'll-never-believe-what-I-did-last-weekend" category, this trip rated pretty high. Chugging out of Ventura Harbor was a boatload of people headed for East Anacapa Island. Their mission: to spend the afternoon with lesbian sea gulls. It did not take long for the jokes to begin. Yet beyond the chuckles, there was an air of seriousness about this crew. A very professorial-looking professor was on board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2010 | Jeff Gottlieb
Nearly 100 years of being battered by the waves, winds and rain, to say nothing of the sea gulls, have taken its toll on the Angels Gate Lighthouse at the entrance to Los Angeles Harbor. The paint is peeling and its iron walls have rusted. The cornice has pulled away and hangs sadly. Inside the 73-foot-tall lighthouse, portions of the floor have rotted where water seeped in. "That's your first impression if you're traveling by sea to Los Angeles," said businessman Gary Dwight.
NATIONAL
October 19, 2008 | Cynthia Dizikes, Times Staff Writer
A construction worker, a nanny and a clothing designer walk into a lighthouse. It sounds like the beginning of a bad joke, but the government couldn't be happier with the punch line. The lighthouse, you see, is surplus federal property -- and if these visitors like what they see, they'll bid against one another for the privilege of purchasing the dilapidated, rusting structure with a 360-degree view of Mount Hope Bay in Massachusetts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2004 | Amanda Covarrubias, Times Staff Writer
California coastal cities vexed by beach pollution have offered up an unconventional solution to the problem: falcons. The birds of prey scare away pesky sea gulls, the main source of avian droppings that can make ocean waters unfit for human frolicking. Enter Jeffrey Diaz, a falconer who saved a Santa Barbara beach from flocks of discharging sea gulls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2002 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Don't run. Shuffle your feet," the naturalist tells the fifth-graders. That's a tall order for 10- and 11-year-olds who have been cooped up on a boat and are ready to scamper up the trails on this wind-swept island. When they round the first bend, all of the rules make sense. Baby sea gulls are everywhere. Nests pop up every 20 feet. Clueless chicks, camouflaged by downy, mottled black and tan feathers, wander in every direction.
NEWS
September 2, 2001 | DAVID SHARP, ASSOCIATED PRESS
There's a crime wave at the beaches, and it seems to be getting worse as the late summer heats up. People who leave their food-laden belongings unattended may find a gang rifling through their stuff. Other times, the thieves snatch their prey right out of victims' hands. The criminals are sea gulls, and park rangers say they always get more daring as summer progresses. It's like a never-ending clip from Alfred Hitchcock's "The Birds."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2001 | LAURA WIDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The body of 16-year-old Juan Jose Mejia Jr., who disappeared in heavy surf off Redondo Beach on Christmas Day, was recovered Tuesday, Los Angeles County lifeguards said. People aboard a 36-foot cruiser notified authorities after seeing the body about 11 a.m., floating near debris nearly 1 1/4 miles from where Mejia had disappeared, lifeguard Capt. Steve Moseley said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1994 | MARTIN MILLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Big Mike" Simpson--the kind of man who can wear a one-carat diamond ring on his pinky finger and not get any static about it--was getting kind of bored Friday morning as he waited for a friend in the parking lot on Warner Avenue near Magnolia Street. To pass the time, the 6-foot, 300-pound chauffeur decided to feed some birds the stale pretzels he found in the trunk of his stretch limousine. "I was crunching the pretzels and slinging them with my right hand," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1997
One of your writers, Brenda Loree, got her facts wrong and has misinformed the public ("Fowl Play: A Swarm of Sea Gulls Invades a Ventura Neighborhood," June 4). NAFTA has nothing to do with the presence of the sea gulls in this housing tract. Mexico is not allowed to ship its avocados into California, and can ship only into the 19 Northeast states during the months of November-February, which are the off months of our Hass production. Avocado prices are actually quite good right now for us local growers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2000
A sea gull was blamed Tuesday for an engine explosion that forced a KLM jumbo jet with 429 on board to return to Los Angeles International Airport last month for an emergency landing. Federal Aviation Administration officials said the bird was identified after the National Transportation Safety Board and the Smithsonian Institution performed tests on organic matter recovered from the damaged engine. The Boeing 747 was taking off Aug.
MAGAZINE
April 2, 2000
"The City of Angels Does Its Dirty Work Well," by James Ricci (SoCal P.O.V., March 5), is interesting but Ricci didn't finish the story. It's an almost constant battle out here to keep big-city sludge from polluting us. That "stuff" still teems with your viruses and bacteria, no matter how appealing it is to the sea gulls. The companies that process what's left over from the sea gulls must first dry it out in huge spreading areas, and guess where they try to do that smelly, harmful, contaminating job: on our pristine land.
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