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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Joe Pinckney, 75, an artist nationally known for his paintings of the Gullah culture on eastern U.S. coastal islands, died Tuesday in Rock Hill, S.C., of kidney failure. Pinckney began painting the Gullah in the 1970s when he became fascinated with their history of relative isolation and independence as island farmers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
December 29, 2005 | Stephanie Simon, Times Staff Writer
The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want. No matter how often he read Psalm 23, Emory Campbell never could understand that line. "I shall not want: What does that mean?" he'd ask himself. Then he joined a project to translate the Bible into the language of his ancestors -- the language of slaves who toiled for centuries in rice paddies off the Carolina coast. That first line became: "De Lawd me shephud. A hab ebryting wa A need." I have everything I need.
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TRAVEL
May 23, 2004 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
"Gator!" Our river guide, Scott Leonard, pointed to what looked like a bumpy log nestled amid the grasses along the banks of the Ashepoo River. If that was an alligator, it was huge. So far, our kayaking trip down this placid South Carolina waterway had been serene. We had paddled leisurely through the dark green water, taking in the canopy of maple, cedar and live oak trees and the old rice fields that bordered the riverbank.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Joe Pinckney, 75, an artist nationally known for his paintings of the Gullah culture on eastern U.S. coastal islands, died Tuesday in Rock Hill, S.C., of kidney failure. Pinckney began painting the Gullah in the 1970s when he became fascinated with their history of relative isolation and independence as island farmers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1986 | From Reuters
Cyclone Raja tore through the tiny French Pacific island of Futuna, killing at least one person, destroying buildings and devastating crops, an Overseas Territories Ministry official said Sunday. The ministry official said the number of casualties was not yet known because there was only intermittent radio contact with Futuna, about 1,600 miles northeast of Australia. Initial reports indicated one person dead and two injured on the island, which has a population of 4,200.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2003 | From Associated Press
President Bush has chosen Sea Island, an island resort community on the Georgia coast to host next year's meeting of leaders from the world's major industrial countries. Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue described the location as "a great venue for security." The island, 60 miles south of Savannah, is close to major military bases and a federal law enforcement training center.
NEWS
July 21, 1991 | JANICE L. KAPLAN, SMITHSONIAN NEWS SERVICE
Many Americans know Vertamae Grosvenor as a broadcast personality. Her insightful essays are heard on National Public Radio. Among the Gullah, a distinctive group of African-Americans, she is affectionately called "Kuta," a nickname that means turtle. As Grosvenor tells it, way back when, she arrived on the scene prematurely. "I weighed like a five-pound bag of sugar when it's a little more than half full," she explains. In other words, a mere three pounds.
NEWS
April 11, 1986 | Associated Press
The Soviet Union has acknowledged that it has in custody a San Francisco man who wandered across the U. S.-Soviet border on the Bering Sea ice pack last week, a U. S. Senate aide said Thursday. The Soviets said John Weymouth is in good health, and will be released at Little Diomede Island next week, said Steve Hansen in the Washington office of Sen. Frank Murkowski of Alaska.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2000 | (Natalie Nichols)
In the true heir to "To Bring You My Love," which placed her among the '90s most compelling, innovative arrivals, Harvey offers a similar fusion of her early punk-blues fury and her pop-cabaret theatricality.
NEWS
January 4, 1987 | STRAT DOUTHAT, Associated Press
Belying his 85 years, Joe Hayward is sound of mind and body. But he is heartsick over changes he has witnessed in his beloved South Carolina Sea Islands. Hayward, a lifelong fisherman and farmer, lives on tiny Warsaw Island with his wife, Rosa. Like thousands of residents in these beautiful, once remote islands between Charleston, S.C., and Savannah, Ga., they are descendants of plantation slaves freed in the Civil War. "My mother was born here, where my house is," the white-haired man said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2005 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
A finalist for the 2002 Pulitzer in drama, Dael Orlandersmith's "Yellowman," now at the Fountain Theatre, is a sweepingly poetical yet down-to-earth drama about the ravages of racial elitism and generational abuse in the Gullah-Geechee culture of South Carolina's Sea Islands. The play commences in the late 1960s, when the burgeoning black pride movement is still just distant thunder to the Gullahs, relegated by race to the lowliest occupations of their isolated rural communities.
TRAVEL
May 23, 2004 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
"Gator!" Our river guide, Scott Leonard, pointed to what looked like a bumpy log nestled amid the grasses along the banks of the Ashepoo River. If that was an alligator, it was huge. So far, our kayaking trip down this placid South Carolina waterway had been serene. We had paddled leisurely through the dark green water, taking in the canopy of maple, cedar and live oak trees and the old rice fields that bordered the riverbank.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2003 | From Associated Press
President Bush has chosen Sea Island, an island resort community on the Georgia coast to host next year's meeting of leaders from the world's major industrial countries. Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue described the location as "a great venue for security." The island, 60 miles south of Savannah, is close to major military bases and a federal law enforcement training center.
NEWS
November 27, 2001 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is a place of great stillness, where the wind cuts across the open marsh and swirls up into the palmetto trees, stirring the leaves together and making a sound like rain. Here a few old people still sit on the beach and weave swamp grass baskets the same way their ancestors did hundreds of years ago. They reach for reeds like the ones that grew in Africa, they speak a musical dialect belonging to a different time.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2000 | (Natalie Nichols)
In the true heir to "To Bring You My Love," which placed her among the '90s most compelling, innovative arrivals, Harvey offers a similar fusion of her early punk-blues fury and her pop-cabaret theatricality.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2000 | NATALIE NICHOLS
Here, finally, is the true heir to Harvey's 1995 album "To Bring You My Love," the collection that placed her among the most compelling, innovative rockers to emerge in the '90s. True, this alternately stark and lush recording's blend of watery and stentorian guitars, naked percussion and piquant keyboards sounds more like thoroughly modern garage-rock than the twisted musical that "Love" evoked.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2005 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
A finalist for the 2002 Pulitzer in drama, Dael Orlandersmith's "Yellowman," now at the Fountain Theatre, is a sweepingly poetical yet down-to-earth drama about the ravages of racial elitism and generational abuse in the Gullah-Geechee culture of South Carolina's Sea Islands. The play commences in the late 1960s, when the burgeoning black pride movement is still just distant thunder to the Gullahs, relegated by race to the lowliest occupations of their isolated rural communities.
NATIONAL
December 29, 2005 | Stephanie Simon, Times Staff Writer
The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want. No matter how often he read Psalm 23, Emory Campbell never could understand that line. "I shall not want: What does that mean?" he'd ask himself. Then he joined a project to translate the Bible into the language of his ancestors -- the language of slaves who toiled for centuries in rice paddies off the Carolina coast. That first line became: "De Lawd me shephud. A hab ebryting wa A need." I have everything I need.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1995 | JANE HULSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Still looking for the perfect pumpkin? Check out the pumpkin festival Sunday at the Channel Islands Harbor Farmer's Market. Not only can you take home a gorgeous gourd, but you can also pucker up for the pumpkinseed spitting contest--and take a look at the newest of the county's farmers' markets. The festival runs during regular market hours, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For those who think a pumpkin is just a goofy vegetable, this festival might change your mind.
NEWS
August 10, 1993 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just a few years ago, Manfred Bartel was living in an automotive Ice Age. Like most drivers in Communist East Germany, he counted himself lucky to even have a car. The average wait was 18 years for an expensive little two-cylinder Trabant that crumpled in most accidents, had the zip of a rusty lawn mower and continuously belched filthy pollutants into the environment.
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