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Sea Islands Culture

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August 28, 1988 | RON HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
On these quiet, dreamy islands just off Georgia and South Carolina, a culture is being lost, a people displaced and, in an odd way, a part of America's most painful history is being replayed across a 20th-Century stage. For nearly 100 years, since the land was ceded to their ancestors after the fall of the Confederacy, children and grandchildren of freed slaves lived here in virtual isolation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Joe Pinckney, 75, an artist nationally known for his paintings of the Gullah culture on eastern U.S. coastal islands, died Tuesday in Rock Hill, S.C., of kidney failure. Pinckney began painting the Gullah in the 1970s when he became fascinated with their history of relative isolation and independence as island farmers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Joe Pinckney, 75, an artist nationally known for his paintings of the Gullah culture on eastern U.S. coastal islands, died Tuesday in Rock Hill, S.C., of kidney failure. Pinckney began painting the Gullah in the 1970s when he became fascinated with their history of relative isolation and independence as island farmers.
NEWS
August 28, 1988 | RON HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
On these quiet, dreamy islands just off Georgia and South Carolina, a culture is being lost, a people displaced and, in an odd way, a part of America's most painful history is being replayed across a 20th-Century stage. For nearly 100 years, since the land was ceded to their ancestors after the fall of the Confederacy, children and grandchildren of freed slaves lived here in virtual isolation.
NEWS
July 21, 1991 | JANICE L. KAPLAN, SMITHSONIAN NEWS SERVICE
Many Americans know Vertamae Grosvenor as a broadcast personality. Her insightful essays are heard on National Public Radio. Among the Gullah, a distinctive group of African-Americans, she is affectionately called "Kuta," a nickname that means turtle. As Grosvenor tells it, way back when, she arrived on the scene prematurely. "I weighed like a five-pound bag of sugar when it's a little more than half full," she explains. In other words, a mere three pounds.
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