Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSea Legs
IN THE NEWS

Sea Legs

FEATURED ARTICLES
TRAVEL
November 7, 2004
I read "Getting Its Sea Legs" [Oct. 24] with great interest. The same problems my wife and I encountered in June during a repositioning/shake-down cruise on the Pride of Aloha apparently still exist. When you pay that much money for a cruise, there is no excuse for poor service and having to pay extra to eat at one of the other restaurants. NCL, apparently, hasn't learned its lesson about taking care of passengers. Bill Sims Encinitas The Norwegian Sky was re-flagged the Pride of Aloha.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
February 3, 2008 | Catharine Hamm
Can you cruise if you're pregnant? Many cruise lines don't want you on board if you are or will as little as 24 weeks into your pregnancy during the cruise. They're concerned about pre-term labor. Although ships are equipped to deal with medical emergencies, an early delivery requires specialized care that most ships simply aren't prepared to provide. Do I need a passport to cruise to Mexico or the Caribbean? Not yet. But you will be better off having one.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1993
As an employee at Ports O'Call in San Pedro, I was very happy to read about Sea Legs in the South Bay edition of Sunday's paper. Seeing as I live in Long Beach, I was sorry that it did not appear in our issue as well. In this day when all you hear about are businesses closing, it is so nice to know that there are still people out there willing to go out on a limb for what they believe in. Gianni Brill and Julie Cross have started something here that goes beyond the traditional business.
NEWS
October 26, 2006 | S. Irene Virbila, Times Staff Writer
WE circle the mall, rolling past Macy's, past Neiman Marcus, past all the usual anchors of every upscale shopping center in the country, until someone in the car finally spots Fashion Island's latest restaurant. There, next to Roy's -- Blue Coral. Love the name. We pull into a parking spot where we're soon rousted by a vigilant valet parker who not so nicely informs us that we've encroached on Roy's territory. Blue Coral's valet station is around the corner.
TRAVEL
February 3, 2008 | Catharine Hamm
Can you cruise if you're pregnant? Many cruise lines don't want you on board if you are or will as little as 24 weeks into your pregnancy during the cruise. They're concerned about pre-term labor. Although ships are equipped to deal with medical emergencies, an early delivery requires specialized care that most ships simply aren't prepared to provide. Do I need a passport to cruise to Mexico or the Caribbean? Not yet. But you will be better off having one.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1993 | DOUG McCLELLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Ease your brails, haul away on your sheets!" First Mate Jon Freidberg ordered the crew of the sleek tall ship as it slipped past the breakwater of Ventura Harbor into the Pacific. The crew members, positioned in two lines along opposite sides of the ship, snapped to comply. They pulled on ropes like combatants in a one-sided tug of war, even though none had ever heard of the small ropes and lines known as brails or sheets. But Freidberg had made allowances for the greenness of his crew.
NEWS
October 26, 2006 | S. Irene Virbila, Times Staff Writer
WE circle the mall, rolling past Macy's, past Neiman Marcus, past all the usual anchors of every upscale shopping center in the country, until someone in the car finally spots Fashion Island's latest restaurant. There, next to Roy's -- Blue Coral. Love the name. We pull into a parking spot where we're soon rousted by a vigilant valet parker who not so nicely informs us that we've encroached on Roy's territory. Blue Coral's valet station is around the corner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1993 | TED JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seated in a swivel chair mounted on a rotating arm, James Neal swung from the port to the starboard side of the sailboat and pulled on the tiller, heading the craft back to its San Pedro berth. "I love it!" he shouted, as the craft began moving back to Ports O' Call.
NEWS
October 19, 2004 | Michael Koehn
This exhaustive collection of maritime facts and fables provides definitive accounts of seaborne tales, from Moses' parting of the Red Sea to the Bermuda Triangle. Peter Jeans explores the gamut of watery legends -- from selkies and sirens to Jonah and Moby Dick. Besides lore, Jeans chronicles notable seagoing feats, such as John Caldwell's 9,000-mile navigation of the Pacific from Panama to Australia in 1945 on a 29-foot yacht.
NEWS
May 27, 1987 | ANN HEROLD
--There are times now that Tina Murphey pinches herself just to make sure it's real. Murphey, a 27-year-old cerebral palsy victim, has been unable to walk since birth. In fact, she couldn't even wiggle her feet. But ever since doctors implanted electrodes in her spine, she has not only been able to flex her toes, she can walk--up to a whole four minutes at last count. "I kind of feel like Cinderella.
TRAVEL
July 30, 2006 | Jane Engle
THE Crown Princess was cleared to sail last weekend after it listed July 18 near Port Canaveral, Fla., and injured 240 people. Luis Diaz, a Coast Guard spokesman in Miami, said the Coast Guard and investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board did not find any "mechanical or electronic issues" aboard the cruise ship after the accident. The ship resumed sailing July 22.
TRAVEL
November 7, 2004
I read "Getting Its Sea Legs" [Oct. 24] with great interest. The same problems my wife and I encountered in June during a repositioning/shake-down cruise on the Pride of Aloha apparently still exist. When you pay that much money for a cruise, there is no excuse for poor service and having to pay extra to eat at one of the other restaurants. NCL, apparently, hasn't learned its lesson about taking care of passengers. Bill Sims Encinitas The Norwegian Sky was re-flagged the Pride of Aloha.
NEWS
October 19, 2004 | Michael Koehn
This exhaustive collection of maritime facts and fables provides definitive accounts of seaborne tales, from Moses' parting of the Red Sea to the Bermuda Triangle. Peter Jeans explores the gamut of watery legends -- from selkies and sirens to Jonah and Moby Dick. Besides lore, Jeans chronicles notable seagoing feats, such as John Caldwell's 9,000-mile navigation of the Pacific from Panama to Australia in 1945 on a 29-foot yacht.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2004 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
Since its first documented use by the Chinese centuries ago, the magnetic compass has guided countless sailors safely across the seas. Though the compass allowed for the advent of modern navigation, early versions could often be wildly imprecise, giving a false sense of security to seafarers and leading to disastrous consequences.
NEWS
November 28, 2002 | S. Irene Virbila, Times Staff Writer
Entrepreneur Brad Johnson has had a hand, as partner, in the Sunset Room, Roxbury and the late Georgia -- all venues more notable for their star-struck youthful patrons than for anything the kitchen put out. But the New York native has been working up to opening his own place for a while now. Just what does he have in mind? A few weeks ago, Johnson launched Menemsha.
TRAVEL
November 17, 2002 | Harry Basch, Special to The Times
With all the unrest in the world, many people are looking for vacations close to home. Southern Californians are fortunate to have seven cruises departing every week from Los Angeles and San Diego. First-timers may want to test the waters with a three-day cruise, sailing from Los Angeles on Friday with a day at sea and a visit to Ensenada, Mexico, or a four-day cruise leaving Monday with a day at sea and calls at Ensenada and Catalina.
SPORTS
April 1, 1999 | VINCE KOWALICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Greanias enjoys fishing. A lot. He hooked his first fish at age 3. At 18, the Crespi High senior owns seven fishing rods and says he goes fishing about 50 days a year. Greanias enjoys fishing so much, he dropped a line to his friends at school. Now the Crespi High Fishing Club, a school of young fishermen under the guidance of Greanias, is getting its sea legs. And so are some of its members.
TRAVEL
September 1, 2002 | Ross Anderson
A generation or so ago, a sailor in search of a tall ship would have needed a time machine. But the fleet of 14 vessels that is to enter Los Angeles Harbor on Friday provides dramatic evidence that tall ships have sailed back onto the traveler's horizon. And the docks at San Pedro are an excellent place to explore them. Before you look for your ship, here are a few things to remember: * Don't assume that sailing a tall ship will cost hundreds of dollars a day.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|