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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
Major storms will be more destructive to coastal areas of Los Angeles as sea level rise accelerates over the century, according to a new study the city of Los Angeles commissioned to help it adjust to climate change. The study by USC took inventory of the city's coastal neighborhoods, roads, its port, energy and water infrastructure to evaluate the damage they would face from a storm under sea level rise scenarios anticipated for mid-century and 2100. Climate change, experts say, will worsen the flooding and erosion coastal areas already face during big storms as rising sea levels result in higher tides and bigger waves and storm surges.
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SPORTS
February 23, 2014 | By Jared S. Hopkins
SOCHI, Russia -- The failure of U.S. skaters to win a medal in long-track speedskating in Russia came on the heels of one of the country's most successful World Cup seasons in years, with 28 medals. How did it all go so wrong? The U.S. Olympic Committee already has promised a thorough investigation, though it also had made clear its support for its partnership with Under Armour and extended its contract through the 2022 Games. U.S. speedskating officials said they will wait for a full analysis.
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NEWS
November 13, 2001 | From Associated Press
The sea level has risen from 12 to 20 inches along Maine's coast and as much as 2 feet in Nova Scotia during the last 250 years, according to a team of international researchers. It's the biggest rise in the last millennium, and global warming is to blame, said Roland Gehrels of the University of Plymouth in England. "Sea level today is rising faster than at any time in the past when it was subject to natural climate change," the lead researcher said.
SCIENCE
February 5, 2014 | By Alan Zarembo, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Here's one solution to the National Football League's concussion problem: Stop playing at sea level. Researchers have found that concussion rates are about 30% lower in games played at higher altitudes. The finding was based on an analysis of all 300 concussions reported during the first 16 weeks of regular-season NFL games in 2012 and 2013. (Week 17 data were not available, since only playoff-bound teams release them.) For every 10,000 times a player suited up, there were 64.3 concussions.
OPINION
September 4, 2005
Re "Misery and Water Keep Rising," Aug. 31 Since much of their country lies below sea level, the Dutch have held back the colossal pressure of the North Sea and its frequent storms for hundreds of years, more recently by a vast system of concrete and steel dikes. After decades of controversial national and local water-control projects, why was New Orleans seemingly protected from the waters of the Mississippi River and Lake Pontchartrain only by two earthen berms on either side of the city?
NEWS
December 8, 1989 | LEE DYE and MAURA DOLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Global warming probably will trigger a sea level rise of no more than a foot by the middle of the next century, only a third as great as some previous scientific projections, a team of experts concluded at the end of a special symposium here Thursday. While any increase in sea level could pose problems for coastal areas, the degree of the threat has been scaled back dramatically, the scientists said. Many projections had predicted an increase of at least three feet over the next 50 years or so.
NEWS
July 1, 1993
A U.S.-French satellite showed that sea levels dropped 12 inches off the East Coast last winter as cold air chilled the Atlantic Ocean and made the water contract. The Topex-Poseidon satellite also found that during the same period, from October, 1992, to March, 1993, sea levels rose 12 inches in parts of the Southern Hemisphere, where warm summer air heated the oceans and made the water expand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
If Earth's temperature rises as much as some scientists project, sea levels may increase by one foot or more in some areas in the next 50 years, scientists said last week. Using a computer model, German researchers examined the oceans' response to a global temperature increase of about 5.5 degrees Fahrenheit over 50 years if current rates of carbon dioxide emissions continue.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
New York, Boston and the northeastern U.S. coast are likely to see the world's biggest sea level rise from global warming, a new study predicts. The coast could see an extra 8-inch rise in addition to however much the oceans rise overall by 2100, because of predicted changes in ocean currents, according to a study online in the journal Nature Geoscience. The study, based on computer models, was by Jianjun Yin of the Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies at Florida State University.
TRAVEL
July 20, 1986 | EILEEN HEYES and ROB WATERS, Heyes is a Times copy editor, Waters a Metro section assistant editor.
As vanloads of sleepy tourists reach this dormant volcano's summit shortly before 6 a.m., the Milky Way still stretches across the sky above Maui. A satellite or two glide among the stars, and the first hint of light appears in the east. Gratefully, the travelers sip coffee and finish the pastries they've nibbled during the 90-minute ride up from Paia, vaguely aware that instructions are being given and they should listen. "The key to safety is common sense," guide Tom Moore is saying.
SPORTS
January 23, 2014 | By Brad Balukjian
The East Rutherford Seahawks? It's got a weird ring to it, but there's a chance that Mother Nature will give the Seahawks a slight home-field kicking advantage in the Super Bowl on Feb. 2 at MetLife Stadium. The cities of East Rutherford, N.J., and Seattle are both approximately at sea level, while the Denver Broncos' Sports Authority Field rises a mile into the sky, where atmospheric pressure is a lot lower and the air is generally less dense. Broncos kicker Matt Prater is accustomed to kicking in Denver's rarefied air. "In Denver, on average, there are fewer molecules per cubic foot in the air," says Tim Gay, a physicist (and author of the book "The Physics of Football")
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
Major storms will be more destructive to coastal areas of Los Angeles as sea level rise accelerates over the century, according to a new study the city of Los Angeles commissioned to help it adjust to climate change. The study by USC took inventory of the city's coastal neighborhoods, roads, its port, energy and water infrastructure to evaluate the damage they would face from a storm under sea level rise scenarios anticipated for mid-century and 2100. Climate change, experts say, will worsen the flooding and erosion coastal areas already face during big storms as rising sea levels result in higher tides and bigger waves and storm surges.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"All Is Lost" begins in darkness. There is a voice, though. Weary, almost apologetic, our man speaks of struggle, of trying and failing against an unforgiving sea. But soon the words stop and other languages - sight, sound, silence - pick up the story. And a face. Weathered and worn by time, Robert Redford is our man. The only one you will see in this spare and unsparing film. A superhero in a hoodie and sneakers in the unlikeliest of action adventures. The mission impossible is not to save the world, but himself.
OPINION
August 14, 2013 | By Reg Green
When I tell people I live in California, they almost always ask where. But when they hear Los Angeles, all too often their faces fall. They were hoping, I suspect, for Sausalito or Pebble Beach. To them Los Angeles is a place of flat, seemingly endless streets, mini-malls wreathed in smog and choking traffic. We all know what they mean. But there's another way to view the city. A few days ago I hiked to the top of Mt. Lowe, 5,600 feet above sea level, with the entire Los Angeles basin spreading out beyond.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
FURNACE CREEK--Blame it on dueling thermometers. The National Weather Service thermometer recorded a peak temperature at 4 p.m. Sunday of 128 degrees in Death Valley National Park, which ties the record for the hottest June day anywhere in the U.S. The National Park Service thermometer - 200 yards away - recorded a temperature of 129.9, which shatters the record for June. But the National Weather Service has the final say, and its official electronic readings will not be available until 8 a.m. Monday.  “There's only one thermometer that counts,” said Charlie Callagan, the park's wilderness coordinator and former head of its weather station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
FURNACE CREEK, Calif. -- At noon, the temperature stood at 122 in the shade, what little of it there was. Ravens huddled in the shadows of desert scrub, panting with their beaks open wide. The Desert pupfish of Salt Creek swam for cover in the deeper, cooler pools near the stream's headwaters. A sign posted at the entrance to the Furnace Creek Golf Course registration office said, “Closed at 12:30 due to extreme heat.” With the temperature inching toward a forecasted peak of an oppressive 130, fluid loss through sweating, with the depletion of sugar and electrolytes, can exceed a gallon an hour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2009 | Margot Roosevelt
As California officials see it, global warming is happening so there's no time to waste in figuring out what to do. California's interagency Climate Action Team on Wednesday issued the first of 40 reports on impacts and adaptation, outlining what the state's residents must do to deal with the floods, erosion and other effects expected from rising sea levels.
SPORTS
July 21, 1988 | Associated Press
Butch Reynolds, a world-class runner for only the past two years, ran the fastest 400 meters ever at sea level and the second-fastest in history, clocking 43.93 seconds Wednesday night in the U.S. Track and Field Trials. Reynolds, 24, of Akron, Ohio, barely missed the world record of 43.86, set by Lee Evans of the United States in the altitude of Mexico City in the 1968 Olympic Games.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
DEATH VALLEY - Blame it on dueling thermometers. The National Weather Service's mercury thermometer recorded a peak of 128 degrees Sunday at 4 p.m in Death Valley National Park, tying the record for the hottest June day anywhere in the U.S. The National Park Service thermometer - about 200 yards away - recorded a temperature of 129.9, shattering that record. But the weather service has the final say, and its official readings won't be available until Monday morning. PHOTOS: Heat wave heats the Southland "There's only one thermometer that counts," said Charlie Callagan, the park's wilderness coordinator and former head of its weather station.
SCIENCE
June 25, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Far more of Earth's water was locked up as ice at the height of the last ice age than previously thought, and current climate change models may need to be adjusted to account for it, according to a new study. The research is the latest salvo from geophysicists who are reexamining assumptions made about Earth's crust by climatologists calculating ancient sea levels. Those levels are commonly used to fine-tune models that attempt to predict how much Earth's average sea level may rise because of climate change.
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