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Sea Lions Population

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2001 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A marine center that rescues imperiled animals has seen a sharp increase in its caseload this spring. And they're happy about it. Officials with the Friends of the Sea Lion Marine Mammal Center say that more sea lions being rescued means that more sea lions are being born, signaling a return to normalcy after a sharp drop in reproduction after the El Nino season of 1997-98.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2001 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A marine center that rescues imperiled animals has seen a sharp increase in its caseload this spring. And they're happy about it. Officials with the Friends of the Sea Lion Marine Mammal Center say that more sea lions being rescued means that more sea lions are being born, signaling a return to normalcy after a sharp drop in reproduction after the El Nino season of 1997-98.
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NEWS
October 16, 1998 | From Associated Press
Killer whales that normally hunt seals and sea lions are now feeding on sea otters and creating an ecological crisis along the entire Aleutian Island chain of western Alaska, researchers say. The sudden loss of thousands of sea otters is allowing a boom in the population of sea urchins and those animals, in turn, are stripping the undersea kelp forest, laying bare vast areas that once were lush with the marine plant.
NEWS
October 16, 1998 | From Associated Press
Killer whales that normally hunt seals and sea lions are now feeding on sea otters and creating an ecological crisis along the entire Aleutian Island chain of western Alaska, researchers say. The sudden loss of thousands of sea otters is allowing a boom in the population of sea urchins and those animals, in turn, are stripping the undersea kelp forest, laying bare vast areas that once were lush with the marine plant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1990 | LINDA ROACH MONROE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A batch of new bathing beauties have taken to sunning themselves near Scripps Institution of Oceanography these days--California sea lions that have turned a floating research platform into a favorite R & R spot. "At first there were only three or four, and then it seemed like there were more every day," said Kristen Ogwaro, a Scripps administrative assistant who watches the sea lions through binoculars and two telescopes brought into the office where she works.
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