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April 20, 1988 | MARIA L. LaGANGA, Times Staff Writer
Once upon a time, in a very wet land called Seattle, a magazine was born to serve the needs of Western boaters. The year was 1908, and the magazine eventually took the name Sea. More than 70 years later, another periodical was born, this time in a slightly drier place called Costa Mesa. It was christened Waterfront, and its focus was on Southern California.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1989
I read with interest the brief editorial about the dangers of alcohol and boating ("A Goal of Sobriety at Sea," June 25). However, the editorial contained an error. It stated that the boating accident in Anaheim Bay that killed five people happened in 1983. It actually happened in 1984. As an editor, I understand that such errors can creep into copy. But I feel it's important to correct the error in print for two reasons: one, those killed were alive in 1983; and two, because this editorial might, in turn, be used as a reference someday and 1983 would go on to be incorrectly cited as the date of the accident.
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BUSINESS
October 12, 1985 | JOYCE GARCIA, Times Staff Writer
Duncan McIntosh Co. of Costa Mesa, which publishes Waterfront magazine for boating enthusiasts in Southern California, has purchased Sea magazine from Petersen Publishing Co. of Los Angeles for an undisclosed figure. A spokesman for the privately owned Petersen company said the deal was most likely a cash purchase. Petersen spokesman Mark Gill said he believes McIntosh bought Sea--which circulates in 13 western states--to use as a "marketing tool" to increase the company's total circulation.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1988 | MARIA L. LaGANGA, Times Staff Writer
Once upon a time, in a very wet land called Seattle, a magazine was born to serve the needs of Western boaters. The year was 1908, and the magazine eventually took the name Sea. More than 70 years later, another periodical was born, this time in a slightly drier place called Costa Mesa. It was christened Waterfront, and its focus was on Southern California.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1988 | MARIA L. La GANGA, Times Staff Writer
Once upon a time, in a very wet land called Seattle, a magazine was born to serve the needs of Western boaters. The year was 1908, and the magazine eventually took the name Sea. More than 70 years later, another periodical was born, this time in a slightly drier place called Costa Mesa. It was christened Waterfront, and its focus was on Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1989
I read with interest the brief editorial about the dangers of alcohol and boating ("A Goal of Sobriety at Sea," June 25). However, the editorial contained an error. It stated that the boating accident in Anaheim Bay that killed five people happened in 1983. It actually happened in 1984. As an editor, I understand that such errors can creep into copy. But I feel it's important to correct the error in print for two reasons: one, those killed were alive in 1983; and two, because this editorial might, in turn, be used as a reference someday and 1983 would go on to be incorrectly cited as the date of the accident.
NEWS
August 30, 1999 | Associated Press
In an attempt to prevent neo-Nazis from building a shrine in Germany, prosecutors ordered the remains of Hitler's secretary, Martin Bormann, committed to the Baltic Sea, a magazine said Sunday. Der Spiegel said that Bormann's remains were scattered two weeks ago after prosecutors ordered his skeleton cremated. Bormann, who was sentenced to death in absentia for war crimes in 1946, was long rumored to be alive after World War II.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2004 | David Reyes, Times Staff Writer
Filling up the SUV for the Memorial Day weekend: $80. Taking a run down to Baja in the motor home: $120. Thinking of heading out to Catalina in the power boat? Ka-ching. Southern California's high-end boat owners aren't letting the cost of gasoline spoil their holiday getaways -- they say celebrating summer's kickoff is worth it. Real estate salesman Dan Keller, 52, and his wife, Claudia, of Dana Point, bought 80 gallons of unleaded fuel for the Fired Up, their handsome, 29-foot dual outboard.
NEWS
October 8, 1992 | MIKE SPENCER, Mike Spencer is a member of The Times Orange County Edition staff who has authored several cookbooks. and
Kay Pastorius is more of a riverboat scrambler than a gambler. And she'll be mixing 'em a lot of things good and proper this winter, plying her trade up and down the Mississippi on the Delta Queen and the Mississippi Queen, two luxury paddle wheelers. Pastorius is a cooking teacher, owner of the School of International Cuisine in Laguna Beach, and--like taking coals to Newcastle--she'll be bringing her Cajun and Creole recipes and expertise to the South.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1988 | MARIA L. La GANGA, Times Staff Writer
Once upon a time, in a very wet land called Seattle, a magazine was born to serve the needs of Western boaters. The year was 1908, and the magazine eventually took the name Sea. More than 70 years later, another periodical was born, this time in a slightly drier place called Costa Mesa. It was christened Waterfront, and its focus was on Southern California.
BUSINESS
October 12, 1985 | JOYCE GARCIA, Times Staff Writer
Duncan McIntosh Co. of Costa Mesa, which publishes Waterfront magazine for boating enthusiasts in Southern California, has purchased Sea magazine from Petersen Publishing Co. of Los Angeles for an undisclosed figure. A spokesman for the privately owned Petersen company said the deal was most likely a cash purchase. Petersen spokesman Mark Gill said he believes McIntosh bought Sea--which circulates in 13 western states--to use as a "marketing tool" to increase the company's total circulation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2006 | Dana Parsons
This is a story about an unusual-looking 40-foot boat with two outriggers and a legend attached. As legends go, this one is way out there. Or, if you like, way up there. The boat's owner, Tom Kardos of Aliso Viejo, isn't all that keen about talking about it, although he believes it's true. "My wife says if I talk about it, make a one-sentence comment and then don't come back to it," Kardos says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1989 | ANTHONY PERRY
We're down to the eye-gouging, resume-rewriting stage of the political season. Stand by, it promises to get even more woolly before Election Day on Tuesday. Incumbents in trouble tend to do oddball things. Take Councilwoman Abbe Wolfsheimer's retort Thursday during a radio debate when challenger Bob Trettin said that, despite Wolfsheimer's no-growth rhetoric, she is developing her own property in Valley Center. "I am not a developer," she snapped. "Mr. Trettin, you're an idiot."
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