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Sea Of Cortez

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SPORTS
November 18, 1992 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bahia de la Ventana has been good to the Lucero family, providing food and livelihood. Gildardo, in his simple 22-foot panga, has been fishing it seriously for 25 years, but he had never seen what Bob Butler hauled out of the tepid, clear waters of the Sea of Cortez last June. Nor did he know of anyone who knew of anyone catching such a fish. " Su papa? " His father had fished the Cortez for 55 years. "No," Gildardo said, shaking his head. " Su abuelo (grandfather) ? " "No."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2013 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
John Steinbeck couldn't find a boat and he needed one desperately. His marriage was in trouble. People in his hometown were vilifying him as a communist rabble-rouser. He figured a sea expedition with his wife, Carol, and marine biologist buddy Ed Ricketts would be just the thing. They chartered a 76-foot sardine boat called the Western Flyer. Over six weeks in 1940, they and a four-man crew chugged from Monterey to the Mexican coast, where they caroused in waterfront bars, poked through tide pools, identified dozens of new species of sea life and collaborated on "Sea of Cortez," a pioneering work of ecology still read by budding ocean researchers.
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SPORTS
November 30, 1988 | PETE THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
Autumn marks the arrival of big-time fishermen who come here to catch big-time fish, primarily the blue marlin that frequent the Mexican waters this time of year. Anglers' express purpose is catching one of these prized billfish. So, scores of cruisers work the sea daily, as if trying to locate a hidden treasure. It's a marlin-sweeping operation of gigantic proportions, particularly outside the Cabo San Lucas Marina.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Garden in the Sea," a lovely documentary from German filmmaker Thomas Riedelsheimer, follows Spanish artist Cristina Iglesias as she creates a sculpture that will sit deep inMexico's Sea of Cortez just at the edge of Espiritu Santo Island. It makes for a very internationally flavored film, one that ultimately relies on the language of sight and sound to speak eloquently about art and ecology and how they can be fused into something extraordinary. The film begins in Madrid not long after Mexican philanthropist Manuel Arango's foundation commissioned Iglesias to create a piece that would reflect his country's efforts to preserve the natural habitat of the island.
SPORTS
February 21, 1990 | PETE THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several small boats are clumped together in one area of an otherwise deserted stretch of sea, the fishermen expressionless as they use their hands in a sweeping motion to pull their lines from the depths. At first sight, a normal looking scene. But upon closer inspection, it becomes obvious that these fishermen are hauling up slithering globs of something red and rubbery. Cephalopods! It's squid, as unsettling a creature as there is in all creation. Some go four feet long and weigh 40 pounds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2004 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
As warm salt water lapped against his legs, Chuck Baxter took delight in the creatures clinging to rocks and skittering around the tidal shallows. His sunburned hands dipped beneath the shimmering surface for a closer examination of starfish, crabs and sponges forming a palette of red, orange, yellow and brown.
TRAVEL
April 26, 1987 | NANCY CLEELAND, Cleeland is a San Diego free-lance writer. and
We were suited up and about to make our first dive of the trip in the Sea of Cortez, but it wasn't the thrilling moment we'd imagined. The water was murky and rough, and the chance of seeing what we'd traveled to the southern tip of Baja to see was fading with the afternoon sun. Just then a crew member saw our quarry. Half a dozen fins sliced through the choppy surface in lazy jerks, moving steadily toward us. There was no mistaking what they were: sharks. Hammerhead sharks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2013 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
John Steinbeck couldn't find a boat and he needed one desperately. His marriage was in trouble. People in his hometown were vilifying him as a communist rabble-rouser. He figured a sea expedition with his wife, Carol, and marine biologist buddy Ed Ricketts would be just the thing. They chartered a 76-foot sardine boat called the Western Flyer. Over six weeks in 1940, they and a four-man crew chugged from Monterey to the Mexican coast, where they caroused in waterfront bars, poked through tide pools, identified dozens of new species of sea life and collaborated on "Sea of Cortez," a pioneering work of ecology still read by budding ocean researchers.
SCIENCE
March 4, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A Mexican marine biologist has discovered a new shark species in the murky depths of the Sea of Cortez. Postgraduate student Juan Carlos Perez was on a fishing boat in early 2003 studying sharks from the genus Mustelus netted at depths of 660 feet when he noticed some of them had darker skin and white markings.
TRAVEL
August 2, 1987 | REBECCA BRUNS, Bruns is the author of a Mexico guidebook. and
From the melancholy Arizona border town of Sonoita, Mexico's Highway 8 ribbons southwest through the lonely reaches of the Sonora Desert. It looks like another road to nowhere, vanishing into a dusty haze stippled with cactuses. Dark volcanic hills gang up like shadows against the plains. Vultures wheel in the hot blue sky.
TRAVEL
November 28, 2010
BAJA CALIFORNIA Whale watching and a nod to Steinbeck The itinerary of the eight-day "Baja California: Among the Great Whales" cruise is inspired by the 70th anniversary of the publication of John Steinbeck's "The Log from the Sea of Cortez. " A Steinbeck expert accompanies the trip and provides insight alongside a seasoned staff of biologists, chemists and adventurers. Itinerary: La Paz to San Carlos, Bahia Magdalena, Los Cabos, Gorda Banks, Islas Los Islotes, Espiritu Santo and back to La Paz. Dates: Departures between Jan. 22 and Feb. 19 Price: Starting at $4,990, double occupancy (single supplement $2,650)
SPORTS
June 14, 2007 | Pete Thomas, Times Staff Writer
The wary predator emerges behind the boat, unfurling a tall and tattered dorsal fin. "Rooster!" a crewman yells, and the baiting game is on. The fin slices shark-like through emerald-colored water, from mullet to mullet, then sinks out of sight. It has been that kind of morning for John and Jennifer Ireland, who've patrolled fruitlessly for hours in search of roosterfish along the barren Baja California coast. But suddenly the fin resurfaces and they have a taker.
SCIENCE
March 4, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A Mexican marine biologist has discovered a new shark species in the murky depths of the Sea of Cortez. Postgraduate student Juan Carlos Perez was on a fishing boat in early 2003 studying sharks from the genus Mustelus netted at depths of 660 feet when he noticed some of them had darker skin and white markings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2004 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
As warm salt water lapped against his legs, Chuck Baxter took delight in the creatures clinging to rocks and skittering around the tidal shallows. His sunburned hands dipped beneath the shimmering surface for a closer examination of starfish, crabs and sponges forming a palette of red, orange, yellow and brown.
SPORTS
August 8, 2003 | Pete Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Mark Ward won't soon forget the look of distress so apparent in the eyes of the floundering whale -- large, hopeful eyes that met his after he'd dived in and attempted to cut away a large net in which the cow and her calf had become perilously entangled.
WORLD
January 25, 2003 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
Of the 900 desert islands that dot the aquamarine waters of the Sea of Cortez, nearly all are owned by the Mexican government and protected as national sanctuaries for seabirds, sea lions and a menagerie of other creatures. A dozen islands, however, have remained stubbornly in private hands, threatened with development in the style of Cabo San Lucas. That's been especially true for a pair of heavily visited islands near the port of La Paz. Until now.
SPORTS
July 5, 2002 | PETE THOMAS
There's a sprawling blue bay about 20 miles south of this small Baja California town, a haven for colorful creatures both wild and wonderful. Tourists from as far north as La Paz and as far south as Cabo San Lucas are brought there to swim among the creatures and to marvel at what a little protection can do for an ecosystem. On a recent boat trip to Cabo Pulmo National Marine Park, with Mark Rayor of Vista Sea Sport (www.vistaseasport.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1991 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A pleasure trip in Baja California Sur ended in tragedy this week for four Southern California residents--including a man and woman from San Marcos--who were aboard a small sailboat that capsized in the Sea of Cortez, apparently in heavy seas, officials said. Rescue craft found the bodies of two of the vacationers, and the search continues for the two missing.
SPORTS
July 5, 2002 | PETE THOMAS
There's a sprawling blue bay about 20 miles south of this small Baja California town, a haven for colorful creatures both wild and wonderful. Tourists from as far north as La Paz and as far south as Cabo San Lucas are brought there to swim among the creatures and to marvel at what a little protection can do for an ecosystem. On a recent boat trip to Cabo Pulmo National Marine Park, with Mark Rayor of Vista Sea Sport (www.vistaseasport.
SPORTS
August 7, 1996 | PETE THOMAS
For William Shachtman, snorkeling with dolphins and sea lions in the blue-green sea outside La Paz was memorable enough. But the face-to-face encounter with an 18-foot silvery, snakelike creature with saucer-shaped eyes and a crimson mane will stay with him forever. "I was awe-struck," said Shachtman, a 53-year-old ophthalmologist from Ft. Collins, Colo. "If I could have walked on water I would have at that point. I had no idea what its intentions were, and it was headed straight for me."
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