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OPINION
May 1, 2012
Re "GOP-backed bill would retain 'no-otter zone,'" April 27 I find it offensive that Rep. Elton Gallegly (R-Simi Valley) would sponsor a bill limiting sea otters' reclaiming their historical range off Southern California. The article states, "Fishermen say their livelihood would be hurt by the unfettered expansion of sea otters into their fishing grounds. " Otters have been inhabiting "their" grounds much longer than humans have. Maybe we need a "no-fisherman zone" to protect the sea otters.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
A $21,000 reward is being offered to help find who shot three California sea otters found dead last fall on a Monterey Peninsula beach, federal wildlife authorities announced Friday. One male sea otter was found dead along Asilomar State Beach in Pacific Grove on Sept. 3, 2013, and  the other two males were found dead two days later in the same area, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said. Two of the furry marine mammals were shot in the head while one was shot through the back, necropsies showed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1992
Re your Oct. 21 article about California sea otters: I am saddened to think that the commercial fishing industry and state Fish and Game Commission are more concerned about the "precious" abalone and sea urchin fisheries in the Monterey area than they are about sea otters. The sea should belong to wildlife first and the fishing industry second. Isn't it enough that the tuna industry threatened the dolphin's safety? Now human greed and selfishness have to threaten sea otters as well?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
Fertilizer runoff has led to a global decline in sea grass meadows, which provide crucial habitat for fish. But thanks to sea otters, these meadows are flourishing in Elkhorn Slough, a major estuary in Monterey Bay, scientists say. Fertilizer from farms in Salinas flows into Elkhorn Slough, carrying phosphates and other nutrients that fuel the growth of algae on sea grass leaves. As the algae blooms, it shades the sea grass from the sunlight it needs to grow. In fact, nutrient levels are so high in Elkhorn Slough that scientists wouldn't expect sea grasses to survive there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1998
Re "Migration of Otters Has Fur Flying," Sept. 6. The apparently unresolvable clash between fishermen and sea otters is not served well when terms like "stray" are used to describe an animal seen in an area where it has heretofore not been seen. Only pets and livestock stray. Emotional arguments aside, there is only one fact that really deserves consideration in this matter, perhaps two. First, the attempt to "manage" a wild species is pure folly motivated by an understandable desire to maintain a financial status quo; in this case, a false population of shellfish created by the sea otter slaughter of the 19th century.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
Fertilizer runoff has led to a global decline in sea grass meadows, which provide crucial habitat for fish. But thanks to sea otters, these meadows are flourishing in Elkhorn Slough, a major estuary in Monterey Bay, scientists say. Fertilizer from farms in Salinas flows into Elkhorn Slough, carrying phosphates and other nutrients that fuel the growth of algae on sea grass leaves. As the algae blooms, it shades the sea grass from the sunlight it needs to grow. In fact, nutrient levels are so high in Elkhorn Slough that scientists wouldn't expect sea grasses to survive there.
OPINION
February 21, 2012 | By James A. Estes
When we think of predators, we don't usually think of sea otters, those cute, furry creatures seen in televised nature specials or on visits to aquariums. But that's what they are, situated near the top of the marine food chain, and their story illustrates the conflict between mankind and all top-level predators, as well as the need to expand our view of the financial and environmental benefits these creatures confer. Sea otters once abounded in coastal waters around the North Pacific Coast from Russia to Mexico.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1988
Has kindness killed the sea otters? The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service brought sea otters to San Nicholas Island hoping to help. They were trying to save them from oil spills, hunters and fishermen but instead, they caused more harm. Of the 69 sea otters they brought to the island, 10 died, 31 are missing and unaccounted for, and 13 swam away from the island. They brought 1 back to the mainland. Now they want to bring 70 more sea otters to the island! I think they should be stopped.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Researchers are trying to determine whether there's a link between runoff waters and the deaths of sea otters along the Central Coast. The state Water Resources Control Board recently approved nearly $500,000 to find out whether polluted runoff is killing sea otters from Half Moon Bay to Santa Barbara. There are now about 2,300 otters. Their numbers have thinned because of a high death rate from disease.
NEWS
August 27, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
State and federal wildlife biologists were preparing Wednesday to fly the first 24 California sea otters to San Nicholas Island in a controversial and ambitious relocation effort. The 24 animals--the first of 70 scheduled for relocation this year--were expected to be moved from the Monterey Bay Aquarium to the island this morning. The otters were held in a secluded area in the aquarium after being captured off the San Luis Obispo County coast Monday and Tuesday.
SCIENCE
August 26, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
Fertilizer runoff has led to a global decline in seagrass meadows, which provide crucial habitat for fish. But thanks to sea otters, these meadows are flourishing in Elkhorn Slough, a major estuary in Monterey Bay, scientists say. Fertilizer from farms in Salinas flows into Elkhorn Slough, carrying phosphates and other nutrients that fuel the growth of algae on seagrass leaves. As the algae blooms, it shades the seagrass from the sunlight it needs to grow. In fact, nutrient levels are so high in Elkhorn Slough that scientists wouldn't expect seagrasses to survive there.
OPINION
August 4, 2013
Re "No-otter zone is sought by lawsuit," Aug. 2 I was the chief negotiated for affected fishermen before Congress established the "otter-free zone" off the Southern California coast in 1986. But in 1993, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service abandoned that program. Before the passage of Public Law 99-625 in 1986, our legal counsel at the time, the Pacific Legal Foundation, determined that the proposal to translocate sea otters to San Nicolas Island violated the Marine Mammal Protection Act. Attorneys for the Interior Department agreed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
Commercial fishermen have filed a lawsuit in federal court challenging the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for abandoning a program to create an "otter-free zone" in Southern California coastal waters that sustain shellfish industries. The lawsuit, filed this week by the Pacific Legal Foundation on behalf of harvesters of sea urchin, abalone and lobster south of Point Conception, accuses the agency of illegally terminating the program without congressional approval or authorization.
SPORTS
February 21, 2013 | By Dan Loumena
Meet Eddie the sea otter. If you're truly a sports fan, he's about to become your favorite creature, because Eddie can dunk a basketball on a hoop in his pool at the Oregon Zoo. That's right. Check out the video above. Eddie, who was a rescue from the coast of California, rises out of the water clutching a miniature basketball and dunks it through the hoop. As Dick Vitale might say, "Awesome, baby!" And if you don't think it's awesome, take the advice of Neil Everett of ESPN and "take some awesome lessons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2012 | By Kenneth R. Weiss, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has decided to allow sea otters to roam freely down the Southern California coastline, abandoning its program to relocate the voracious shellfish eaters from waters reserved for fishermen. Federal officials determined that their sea otter trans-location program had failed after 25 years and thus they were terminating it, according to a decision published in the Federal Register on Wednesday. "As a result, it allows sea otters to expand their range naturally into Southern California," the notice said.
SCIENCE
December 19, 2012 | By Kenneth R. Weiss
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has decided to allow sea otters to roam freely down the Southern California coastline, abandoning its program to relocate the voracious shellfish eaters from waters reserved for fishermen. Federal officials determined that their sea otter trans-location program had failed after 25 years and thus they were terminating it, according to a decision published in the Federal Register on Wednesday. "As a result," the federal notice said, "it allows sea otters to expand their range naturally into Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
They won't be asking about ethnicity or household income, but biologists have begun their annual spring sea otter census. Sea otters are a keystone species, mammals at the top of the food chain and an indicator of the health of the marine ecosystem that is their habitat. This year's count began Monday at Pescadero Point. Four field biologists armed with Leica binoculars and Questar scopes spotted nine otters, one fewer than last spring. The census is a joint project of the U.S.
OPINION
May 1, 2012
Re "And the veep choice is…," Opinion, April 26 Among the criteria Doyle McManus lists for potential vice president picks is that the ideal candidate needs to avoid gaffes. His example is Sarah Palin, the 2008 nominee, but when mentioning Vice President Joe Biden all McManus refers to is Biden's securing the Pennsylvania vote. Biden is to gaffes as Thomas Edison was to electricity. The frequency and outrageousness of Biden's gaffes would make professional comedy writers insecure.
OPINION
May 1, 2012
Re "GOP-backed bill would retain 'no-otter zone,'" April 27 I find it offensive that Rep. Elton Gallegly (R-Simi Valley) would sponsor a bill limiting sea otters' reclaiming their historical range off Southern California. The article states, "Fishermen say their livelihood would be hurt by the unfettered expansion of sea otters into their fishing grounds. " Otters have been inhabiting "their" grounds much longer than humans have. Maybe we need a "no-fisherman zone" to protect the sea otters.
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