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NEWS
April 26, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
 Sea salt is not a low-sodium version of table salt, but 61% of Americans believe it is. Further, while most Americans believe (perhaps accurately, in this regard) that drinking wine is good for the heart, they don’t know the recommended limits. Such are the results from an American Heart Assn. poll  meant to assess how much adults know about the risk factors for high blood pressure. The survey of 1,000 results had at least one encouraging finding—59% of Americans know their blood pressure numbers.
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FOOD
December 5, 2013 | Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Total time: 2 hours, plus chilling and assembly time Servings: 4 Note: Please see the accompanying source box on where to buy seafood. Fresh, cooked Dungeness crab can be substituted for the live crab (omit Step 5). 2 bay leaves 8 parsley sprigs 4 thyme sprigs 3 cloves garlic 2 tablespoons black peppercorns 1 small to medium fennel bulb, trimmed and coarsely chopped 2 carrots, peeled and cut crosswise into about ¿1/2¿-inch pieces 3 leeks, dark and light parts, rinsed and cut into¿ ¿1/2¿-inch pieces 2 cups dry white wine 1 cup white wine vinegar 2 lemons, halved Fine sea salt 12 large shrimp (1 pound total)
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MAGAZINE
August 25, 2002 | JAMES PURVIANCE, Jamie Purviance's latest book is ''Weber's Big Book of Grilling.''
Without it, our nerves would misfire, our muscles would cramp and our blood would thicken. Of course, most Americans eat so much more salt than we need that the chance of suffering from a lack of it is close to nil. In fact, the trend today is toward more salt--more kinds, colors and origins. All salts come from the sea, though some of them from ancient, dried-up seas that today are trapped underground. The salt mined from these underground deposits is called rock salt.
FOOD
June 1, 2013
  45 minutes. 4 servings 4 (1½-pound) Maine lobsters, preferably female 1 cup (400 grams) garlic-infused olive oil (see note) 2 cups lightly packed (40 grams) basil leaves, stems removed 1 1/2 cups, lightly packed (40 grams) parsley leaves, stems removed 2 teaspoons (2 grams) chile flakes About 1¼ teaspoons (8 grams) sea salt, plus more for seasoning the lobsters Champagne or white wine vinegar 4 lemons Espelette powder or cayenne pepper, for seasoning the lobsters Salted butter for brushing the lobsters and melted for the table 1. Make the herbed oil: Place the garlic oil in the bowl of a food processor along with the basil, parsley, chile flakes and 1¼ teaspoons sea salt.
FOOD
October 31, 2007 | Russ Parsons, Times Staff Writer
What was quite possibly the single best dish I've eaten this year came to my table as a bleak white mound that looked less like food than some kindergartner's art project igloo. That it was wheeled with such ceremony through the dining room of Providence restaurant on a table-side service cart only added to the sense of surrealism. What in the world could this be?
FOOD
July 5, 2006 | Russ Parsons, Times Staff Writer
JUDY RODGERS has firm opinions on salt. Well, to be honest (and that's the only way she would have it), Rodgers has firm opinions on many, many things, including such disparate topics as the unthinking use of lemon as an all-purpose acidifier, why Kennebec and Winnemucca are the perfect potatoes for frying, and the tip-driven inequities between waiters' and cooks' take-home pay. These aren't knee-jerk opinions.
NEWS
November 12, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
To keep a lobster tail straight while cooking, run a skewer through the center of the fan and up the length of the tail. If the lobster is whole, run the skewer all the way through. (To kill the lobster painlessly first, freeze it for a couple hours before preparing). As a lobster is cooked, the tail meat naturally wants to contract and curl; the skewer will keep it straight. This technique also works for large shrimp and prawns. If you're boiling lobsters and are working with even numbers, you can also keep their tails straight by tying each pair together before boiling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1998
Q: What is so special about sea salt, as compared to regular salt? A: Nothing, except that sea salt is much more expensive, according to the UC Berkeley Wellness Letter. Sea salt has no nutritional advantage and isn't less or more salty tasting. Like regular table salt, sea salt must contain at least 97.5% sodium chloride. Unrefined sea salt, made by evaporation of seawater, contains small amounts of magnesium, sulfur and calcium, but it is never sold as edible salt.
FOOD
August 11, 2012 | By Michael Cimarusti
The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears or the sea.¿ - Isak Dinesen Salt is the one ingredient that every person has in his or her cupboard. If you are like me, you might have several varieties from various far-flung sources. I've got smoked salt, mined salt, salt from the peaks of the Himalayas and salt derived directly from the sea, including my three favorites, fleur de sel , Maldon salt and sel gris . One of salt's most miraculous attributes is its ability to preserve foods.
FOOD
October 18, 2006
Total time: 1 hour, 10 minutes Servings: 4 1 kabocha squash 1 tablespoon canola oil 3/4 cup pecan halves 1/4 cup butter 1/4 teaspoon sea salt 4 teaspoons maple syrup 1 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg Fleur de sel 1. Heat the oven to 400 degrees. Cut the squash into quarters and scoop out the seeds. Brush the cut surfaces of squash with oil. Put the squash cut-side down on a foil-lined baking pan. Roast until the squash is fork tender, about 60 minutes.
FOOD
June 1, 2013
  About 1 hour 4 servings Homemade mayonnaise 3 egg yolks 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 2 tablespoons lemon juice 2 jiggers hot sauce, preferably Tabasco About 2¼ teaspoons (7 grams) kosher salt 2 1/2 cups (500 grams) vegetable oil 2 tablespoons water, or as needed Place the egg yolks, mustard, lemon juice, hot sauce and salt in a large, deep jar or similar container. Using an immersion blender, combine the ingredients.
FOOD
May 20, 2013 | By Emily Green
Total time: 40 minutes Servings: 6 Note: From Nancy Silverton. Silverton says burgers are the perfect party food because the toppings can be done in advance, then guests use them to personalize their burgers. Though she offers three cheeses, she says that from experience, most takers are for Gruyere, 25% might take cheddar and one of a group will want blue. Crumble out enough blue to look pretty in a bowl, 2 to 3 ounces, and know it may go into salad dressing for the next meal.
FOOD
May 13, 2013 | By Betty Hallock and Donna Deane, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
Who doesn't love a cucumber? Picklers, slicers, green or yellow, smooth or bumpy, thin- or thick-skinned, chubby Kirbys, little cornichons, English, Japanese, Persian. Good thing then that with the impending heat comes cucumber season. They peak with the tomatoes, peppers, eggplants and those other cucurbits, squashes and melons, but among all these, cucumbers are the most like Johnny Depp -- very, very cool. With their refreshing herbaceous flavor and their snappy crunch, cucumbers are exactly what we want to eat right now -- still (they've been cultivated for more than 3,000 years)
NEWS
April 18, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
Lettuce Entertain You restaurant group and Jeff Mahin, the chef behind Stella Rossa Pizza Bar in Santa Monica and Do-Rite Donuts in Chicago, plan to open Stella Barra in Hollywood. Located in the former BoHo space in the ArcLight Cinemas complex on Sunset Boulevard, it's expected to open at the beginning of May. With breakfast-lunch-and-dinner ambitions, “we're taking all the good things at Stella Rossa and refining it,” Mahin says. “It's going to be similar but have a bigger menu and bigger plates.
FOOD
January 26, 2013
Sriracha-style hot sauce Total time: 25 minutes Servings: Makes about 1½ cups sauce Note: This sauce should be prepared in a well-ventilated area and is best prepared at least 1 to 2 days before using. Cane vinegar and palm sugar can be found at select well-stocked cooking stores, as well as Asian markets. 1 pound mixed fresh red chiles (such as red Fresnos or jalapeños), stemmed and chopped 2 to 4 cloves garlic 1/4 cup cane or rice vinegar 1 1/2 teaspoons sea salt, more if desired 2 tablespoons palm or light brown sugar, more if desired 1. In the bowl of a food processor, pulse together the chiles, garlic, vinegar, salt and sugar to form a coarse paste.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
You don't have to be an adherent of raw food (nothing heated to more than 115 degrees) to appreciate some dishes in the raw. A story about the new raw food restaurant M.A.K.E. and its culinary academy uncovers a cuisine that's coming in from the fringe. (Who doesn't love zucchini "noodle" lasagna, anyway?) "I think now a lot of people who are not strict about raw food are incorporating it into their diets," says M.A.K.E. owner Matthew Kenney.  Much of the cuisine at M.A.K.E.
FOOD
August 25, 2012
Shio koji step by step Koji (such as Cold Mountain brand) can be purchased at select Japanese markets such as Nijiya, Marukai and Mitsuwa. Place 1 1/2 cups (200 grams) koji in a medium nonreactive bowl or container and add 4 2/3 tablespoons (70 grams) sea salt. Mix thoroughly and vigorously, using your hands. Heat 1 1/4 cup water to 140 degrees and add just enough of the water to moisten the mixture. Knead until fragrant, about 1 minute. Then mix in the remaining hot water.
FOOD
December 28, 2005
Total time: 40 minutes Servings: 6 Note: This recipe from Nancy Silverton was the centerpiece of a story by Emily Green. According to Silverton, the key to a great hamburger is the meat, which should have ample fat. Ask the butcher to coarsely grind 2 3/4 pounds of prime chuck (10% to 15% fat) with 4 to 6 ounces of prime sirloin fat (the combination should have 20% to 28% fat total). Though she offers three cheeses, she says that from experience, most takers go for Gruyère, 25% might take cheddar and one of a group will want blue.
NEWS
December 19, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
Holiday traffic, gift shopping, partying…. It's a relief to slow down with a good cookbook that reflects an idyllic life on a farm in northern  Japan , where the cooking revolves around food that's grown at home and prepared simply. “ Japanese Farm Food ” by Nancy Singleton Hachishu, who moved from California to Japan and ended up marrying a farmer and living in his ancestral home two hours from Tokyo, is a transporting respite. The book opens with a description of her Japanese farmhouse kitchen, a place of wood posts and beams, filled with her collection of 100-year-old baskets and bowls.
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