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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1995 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 62-year-old Lancaster man accused of trying to sell U.S. defense secrets pleaded not guilty in federal court Tuesday to attempted espionage charges. John Douglas Charlton, a retired Lockheed engineer, entered his plea in Los Angeles before U.S. District Judge Harry L. Hupp, who ordered a Nov. 7 trial.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1995 | ANN W. O'NEILL and PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To federal prosecutors, the indictment of a former Lockheed engineer on attempted espionage charges serves as a warning to other disgruntled aerospace workers tempted to sell classified information about secret defense projects. But on Friday, after John Douglas Charlton appeared before a magistrate in U. S. District Court in Los Angeles, his attorney said federal authorities had found the wrong "scapegoat."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1995 | ANN W. O'NEILL and PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To federal prosecutors, the indictment of a former Lockheed engineer on attempted espionage charges serves as a warning to other disgruntled aerospace workers tempted to sell classified information about secret defense projects. But on Friday, after John Douglas Charlton appeared before a magistrate in U. S. District Court in Los Angeles, his attorney said federal authorities had found the wrong "scapegoat."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1995 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 62-year-old Lancaster man accused of trying to sell U.S. defense secrets pleaded not guilty in federal court Tuesday to attempted espionage charges. John Douglas Charlton, a retired Lockheed engineer, entered his plea in Los Angeles before U.S. District Judge Harry L. Hupp, who ordered a Nov. 7 trial.
NEWS
May 26, 1995 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN and ERIC SLATER and JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a move the government called a warning to disgruntled aerospace workers tempted to peddle U. S. defense secrets, a former Lockheed engineer was indicted Thursday on attempted espionage charges for allegedly trying to sell secret plans concerning the Sea Shadow, a Navy stealth project. John Douglas Charlton, 62, reportedly tried to sell plans concerning the ship and other projects to an FBI agent posing as an official from a Western European government, according to prosecutors.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1993 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a decade of secrecy, the Navy last month unveiled its seafaring version of the Stealth fighter plane, called the Sea Shadow. The 160-foot-long ship was engineered by Lockheed Corp.'s Advanced Development Projects unit in Burbank, better known as the Skunk Works, which also designed the F-117A Stealth fighter. Indeed, analysts say Sea Shadow looks like the F-117A on pontoons, having the same angular shape intended to make it invisible to radar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1995 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A retired aerospace engineer admitted in federal court Tuesday that he tried to sell classified defense information for $100,000 to a man he believed was a representative of France but turned out to be an undercover FBI agent. John Douglas Charlton pleaded guilty before U. S. District Court Judge Harry L. Hupp to two counts of attempted transfer of defense information and could face a maximum 20 years in prison when he is sentenced Jan. 8.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1996
At some point, it has to be faced. Finding a practical civilian use for advanced stealth technology has been, well, difficult. Even in the military, failures were as significant as successes. The "Sea Shadow" stealth ship, unveiled in 1993, looked like a giant, ocean-skimming roach. Just one was built. The "Tacit Blue" stealth spy plane resembled an inverted bathtub and was tested from 1982 to 1985. It was scrapped and never flew a real surveillance mission.
NEWS
May 26, 1995 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN and ERIC SLATER and JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a move the government called a warning to disgruntled aerospace workers tempted to peddle U. S. defense secrets, a former Lockheed engineer was indicted Thursday on attempted espionage charges for allegedly trying to sell secret plans concerning the Sea Shadow, a Navy stealth project. John Douglas Charlton, 62, reportedly tried to sell plans concerning the ship and other projects to an FBI agent posing as an official from a Western European government, according to prosecutors.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1993 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a decade of secrecy, the Navy last month unveiled its seafaring version of the Stealth fighter plane, called the Sea Shadow. The 160-foot-long ship was engineered by Lockheed Corp.'s Advanced Development Projects unit in Burbank, better known as the Skunk Works, which also designed the F-117A Stealth fighter. Indeed, analysts say Sea Shadow looks like the F-117A on pontoons, having the same angular shape intended to make it invisible to radar.
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