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NEWS
December 27, 2011 | By Peter Nicholas
It's too early to say whether President Obama has the upper hand in campaign 2012, but the verdict is in on one point: Obama is having the more relaxing week. As the Republican presidential field jockeys for advantage in the final days before the Iowa caucuses, the Obamas move from one really fun sun-splashed outing to the next. Tuesday found the first family releasing four green sea turtles into Hanauma Bay. The turtles, each 18 months old, were born at Sea Life Park north of the bay. The bay is closed on Tuesdays for routine maintenance, giving the Obamas privileged access to a tourist spot famous for its spectacular snorkeling.
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SCIENCE
February 6, 2014 | By Amina Khan
How do young, naive salmon with no migratory experience somehow voyage through vast, shifting ocean waters to wind up at specific feeding grounds that are hundreds, even thousands, of kilometers away from the rivers where they were hatched? It turns out these fish may have a magnetic 'map' in their heads that enables them to sense and navigate using the Earth's magnetic fields rather like a GPS. The findings, published in Current Biology, “likely explain the extraordinary navigational abilities evident in many long-distance underwater migrants,” the study authors wrote.
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NATIONAL
June 12, 2010 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
Each summer, a ritual millions of years old unfolds on this beach, next to the high-rise condos and beach chairs, the T-shirt shops and the Hooters across the road. A 300-pound loggerhead turtle drags herself out of the water for the first time since her birth, probably on the same beach, 18 years ago. Under the moonlight, she kicks a 2-foot-deep hole into the sand, drops in a gleaming heap of eggs, covers it and then lumbers back out to sea. Two months later, 100 or more tiny turtles will scratch their way up through the sand, glimpse the shine of the moon and stars on the water that serves as some kind of celestial GPS, and head for the sea. Fishermen's nets, children with sand shovels, confusing waterfront lights and pollution have plundered the sea turtles, leaving all five species that inhabit the Gulf of Mexico endangered or threatened.
SCIENCE
January 11, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
The California Coastal Commission has approved development of the first shellfish ranch in federal waters, a 100-acre underwater plot for cultivating and harvesting about 2.6 million pounds of Mediterranean mussels a year. “It's quite an achievement and I'm pretty happy about it,” Philip Cruver, president and director of Catalina Sea Ranch, said about the commission's unanimous vote Wednesday. “But I always knew it would happen because of the demand.” Catalina Sea Ranch's business strategy is in line with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's aim to create jobs, provide highly nutritional food and improve the marine environment by putting more shellfish back in U.S. waters.
NEWS
September 3, 1989 | JEAN-MICHEL COUSTEAU
Turtles are the oldest reptiles on Earth, lethargic in fable, yet surprisingly graceful in reality. These lumbering, air-breathing, peaceful creatures are unlikely candidates for controversy. Yet, the languid sea turtles are the focus of a delicate political and economic ballet involving the U.S. shrimping industry, the U.S. Department of Commerce and environmentalists--a ballet that demonstrates a growing clash between protecting endangered species and maintaining precarious marine industries.
NEWS
October 18, 2005 | David Lukas
[ CHELONIA MYDAS ] Although there may be an odd sighting once in a while, sea turtles are not typically associated with California. Restricted to warm tropical waters, the rare green sea turtle that wanders north in summer must retreat south with the coming of winter. Imagine the surprise of scientists when they discovered 50 to 60 of these turtles living in south San Diego Bay in 1976.
SCIENCE
April 24, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Consider the baby sea turtle: Just a few inches long, it emerges from its sandy nest and, using the moon as its compass, runs down the sandy beach away from its many predators and into the relative safety of the ocean surf. The faster these little guys run, the more likely they will survive sea gulls, crabs, snakes, rats and a long list of other animals waiting to eat them. And so, these primarily aquatic animals have developed mechanisms that allow them to move at speeds of several body lengths per second on both sandy and firm terrain.
NATIONAL
November 26, 2008 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
A cold snap has caused a high number of the world's most endangered sea turtles to wash ashore dead on Cape Cod beaches. Thirty Kemp's Ridley sea turtles have been reported on the beaches since Thursday. Nineteen were dead. Sea turtles suffering from hypothermia often wash ashore in November and December. When the animals' heart rate and body temperature fall, they become immobile. Wind blows them to shore, where they risk freezing to death.
NATIONAL
July 15, 2010 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
Is it possible to save a generation without breaking any eggs? That's the tricky question the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, FedEx and hundreds of volunteers are beginning to answer this week as they dig up more than 70,000 turtle eggs on the gulf shore and transport them to the oil-free beaches of Cape Canaveral, Fla., where they'll be hatched in a warehouse and released into the ocean. It's one of the most ambitious wildlife nest relocations ever attempted, biologists said, a risky experiment to prevent widespread mortality of five threatened and endangered turtle species.
NEWS
October 14, 1990 | RICHARD JACOBSEN, REUTERS
Nicaragua has deployed machine gun-toting police force dressed in battle fatigues and combat boots to make this Pacific coast beach safe for sea turtles. Each year, guided by moonlight, tens of thousands of sea turtles crawl out of the surf to lay hundreds of thousands of eggs in the beach at Chococente and elsewhere along the coast.
SCIENCE
May 28, 2013 | By Julie Cart
Federal scientists for the first time have mapped the migration patterns and feeding grounds of Kemp's ridley sea turtle in the Gulf of Mexico, and the study reveals that the favored feeding sites for the endangered turtles overlap with the most-damaged areas of the gulf. Researchers with the National Park Service and the U.S. Geological Survey found that the small turtles predominantly forage in waters where there is extensive commercial fishing, frequent oil spills and a well-known oxygen depletion zone.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Oh, nature, so near and yet so far: the thing we live in and deny, worship and destroy. The nagging conscience of our modern dystopian times! It is spiritually useful to be reminded that there is a world of animals that -- for the moment, at least -- live their lives independent of human interference, on land that has not been subdivided, strip-malled, strip-mined, plowed up or plowed under. So, although in its framing, editing and analogizing it does impose a human framework on the unknowable intelligences of its subjects, we are thankful (on balance)
SCIENCE
May 3, 2013 | By Julie Cart
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has two months to identify suitable in-water nesting and migratory habitat for endangered loggerhead sea turtles, according to a legal settlement filed this week. The agreement - between the wildlife service and the groups Center for Biological Diversity, Turtle Island Restoration Network and Oceana - gives the government until July 1 to propose feeding, breeding and migratory habitat in the Gulf of Mexico and U.S. waters in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.
SCIENCE
April 24, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Consider the baby sea turtle: Just a few inches long, it emerges from its sandy nest and, using the moon as its compass, runs down the sandy beach away from its many predators and into the relative safety of the ocean surf. The faster these little guys run, the more likely they will survive sea gulls, crabs, snakes, rats and a long list of other animals waiting to eat them. And so, these primarily aquatic animals have developed mechanisms that allow them to move at speeds of several body lengths per second on both sandy and firm terrain.
SCIENCE
April 22, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Happy Earth Day! It's been 43 years since Wisconsin Sen. Gaylord Nelson celebrated the very first Earth Day on April 22, 1970. It's not yet a federal holiday, but Earth Day is celebrated by schoolkids from coast to coast (along with many adults). Of course, it goes without saying that for some folks, every day is Earth Day. Here are seven things you might not have known about Earth Day (and the spirit of environmentalism it represents): * More than 1 billion people in 192 countries are doing something to mark Earth Day this year, according to estimates from the Earth Day Network . In Veracruz, Mexico, volunteers will clean up beaches to improve the habitat for sea turtles.
NEWS
January 1, 2013 | By Rosemary McClure
The end of the holiday season sparks some great deals for travelers in Mexico 's Baja, including lodging and spa packages at Hacienda Beach Club & Residences in Cabo San Lucas . And the lodging specials at the resort include an opportunity to help with a conservation program. The 2-year-old Hacienda offers a long list of family-friendly activities, including a save-the-turtles program, which gives visitors a chance to release baby turtles to the sea. Within the last few months, guests have helped send more than 1,400 turtles on their way.  "We work closely with local officials on the turtle release program," said Ricardo Ramirez, Hacienda Beach Club & Residences general manager, who described the activity as a "one-of-a-kind experience" for guests.  Every year, female turtles, many of them Olive Ridley sea turtles -- also known as Golfina turtles -- lay thousands of eggs in nests on the beach.
NATIONAL
March 10, 2010 | By C. Ron Allen
The hospital waiting room was packed with patients, but not with humans. These were endangered green sea turtles covered with golf-ball-sized growths. At least 40 scientists and veterinarians participated in delicate surgeries at the Gumbo Limbo Nature Center on Tuesday to remove noncancerous tumors, called fibropapilloma. The tumors, some of them on the turtles' eyes, resembled moldy cauliflower. Once the tumors are removed, some turtles will have a chance to regain lost sight.
NEWS
December 13, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Explore Hawaii 's Big Island on a two-wheel tour to see the rim of Kilauea Crater, sea turtles at Walohinu and Kona's lush coffee country. The seven-day Hawaii Classic Bike Tour from Bicycle Adventures features a circumnavigation of the perimeter of the island, with rides averaging 45 miles a day. Off-bike activities include a hike into Kilauea Crater, with two nights spent at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park , and a catamaran trip to go snorkeling. The tour begins in Waikoloa.
TRAVEL
October 21, 2012 | By Michele Bigley
KEALAKEKUA, Hawaii - My husband, Eddie, was allergic to his wedding ring. I know that sounds like a bad opening to a novel, but aside from the traditional growing pains, we were solid. So instead of overanalyzing the fact that his skin became irritated whenever he slipped on the white-gold band, I decided to remedy the situation. We had been together for 12 years, and Hawaii was the place we escaped to whenever we needed to slow down and forgive each other for life's minor squabbles.
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