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BUSINESS
December 27, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
SeaWorld Entertainment Inc. and its killer whales are going public, filing for an initial public offering that could raise $100 million. The theme park company, famous for using the orca Shamu as a performer, said in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission that it hopes to trade under the SEAS ticker. But it didn't say much else - not what exchange will host its stock, or how many shares will be up for grabs, how those shares will be priced or when they'll be offered.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- The county Board of Supervisors voted 3 to 1 Tuesday to oppose any attempt by the state Legislature to "eliminate or restrict the use of orcas at SeaWorld . " A legislative committee last week delayed a vote on a bill that would end orca shows at SeaWorld San Diego. The bill, sponsored by Assemblyman Richard Bloom (D-Santa Monica), was sent out for "interim study," an ill-defined process that could last 18 months. The county board alerted the chief administrative officer to be ready to oppose any attempt to reintroduce the Bloom bill or any other bill to curtail the killer whale shows.
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NEWS
March 25, 2014 | By Karin Klein
Killer whale shows may be a bad idea, but should they be illegal? An upcoming bill in the California Legislature would ban such shows in the state - which boils down to banning them at Sea World in San Diego - as well as forbidding captive breeding and the import or export of killer whales, which despite their names are actually the largest of the dolphins. It's increasingly hard to buy Sea World's contention that killer whales are happy colleagues of their human captors in this whole training and entertainment business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SeaWorld lost a major round Friday in its legal fight to put its trainers back into the water with killer whales during the parks' marquee orca shows. By 2-1, a panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C., rejected an appeal by SeaWorld of a citation issued in 2012 by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration after its investigation into the 2010 drowning death of a trainer at the SeaWorld park in Orlando, Fla. In court documents, SeaWorld had argued that proximity of the trainers to the killer whales was central to the appeal of the orca shows and without that proximity the shows would lose popularity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
David W. Kenney, SeaWorld's first veterinarian, who played a key role in bringing the original Shamu to the San Diego amusement park as well as a gray whale believed to be the first raised by humans, died Feb. 14 in Montrose, Colo. He was 77. The cause was cancer, said his sister, Meredith Maler. Kenney was hired by the park a few weeks before its 1964 opening and over the next several years displayed an ingenuity and dedication that helped the fledgling tourist attraction build and maintain an impressive collection of marine animals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1992 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acknowledging that his action may affect his own financial portfolio, Gov. Pete Wilson on Monday signed into law an exemption allowing Anheuser-Busch to sell hard liquor at its Sea World park in San Diego. The St. Louis-based beer giant asked for the exemption because state "tied-house" laws prohibit any liquor manufacturer from selling alcoholic beverages at retail outlets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1987
Two dolphins sent to Sea World in San Diego after Marineland closed died soon after arriving in their new home, a Sea World spokeswoman said Saturday. The deaths were disclosed by a group protesting last month's closing of Marineland. A Sea World spokesman said that Sundance, an 8-year-old bottle-nose male, died Feb. 20 from a skull fracture and cerebral hemorrhage suffered during a fight with other males. Echo, a 30-year-old female, died Feb. 24 from an infection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1985 | DAVID FREED, Times Staff Writer
A U.S. District Court judge in Anchorage, supporting a lawsuit brought by a coalition of environmentalists, has voided a federal permit authorizing Sea World of San Diego to capture 100 killer whales along Alaska's coast, it was announced Monday. Judge James A.
TRAVEL
October 3, 1999
Want to get treated like a VIP at SeaWorld Adventure Park in Orlando, Fla.? Or do you just have more money than time? Ante up $101.64 per adult (that's $55 plus park admission of $46.64), and you can join the new "Adventure Express" tours. These offer backdoor access to two rides; reserved seating for two animal shows; your own guide; and chances to touch or feed penguins, dolphins, stingrays and sea lions. Children 3 to 9 pay $50, plus $37.10 admission, for the 5 1/2-hour tour.
NEWS
January 22, 1985 | DAVID FREED, Times Staff Writer
A U.S. district court judge in Anchorage, Alaska, supporting a lawsuit brought by a coalition of environmentalists, has voided a federal permit authorizing Sea World of San Diego to capture 100 killer whales along the Alaskan coast, it was announced Monday. Judge James A.
OPINION
April 8, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The lives of captive killer whales are nothing like those of their wild counterparts. Instead of roaming for miles every day in close-knit family groups, captive whales perform for audiences in tanks that, though roomier than those of early marine parks, are far too small for such large ocean predators. In the wild, killer whales have not been known to kill humans or one another. The same cannot be said for the whales in amusement parks around the world, even though they represent only about a tenth of a percent of the numbers in the wild.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2014 | By Hugo Martín
Amid ongoing controversy over its killer whale shows, SeaWorld Entertainment Inc. reported a 13% drop in attendance for the first three months of the year. The attendance numbers were included in a notice to the Securities and Exchange Commission that SeaWorld was buying 1.75 million of its own shares from private equity firm Blackstone Group. The notice said attendance for the quarter that ended March 31 dropped to about 3.05 million visitors from 3.5 million in the same period in 2013.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
Amid ongoing controversy over its killer whale shows, SeaWorld Entertainment Inc. reported a 13% drop in attendance for the first three months of the year. The attendance numbers were included in a notice to the Securities and Exchange Commission that SeaWorld was buying 1.75 million of its own shares from Blackstone Group. The notice said attendance for the three-month period that ended March 31 dropped to about 3.05 million visitors from 3.5 million in the same period in 2013.
NEWS
March 25, 2014 | By Karin Klein
Killer whale shows may be a bad idea, but should they be illegal? An upcoming bill in the California Legislature would ban such shows in the state - which boils down to banning them at Sea World in San Diego - as well as forbidding captive breeding and the import or export of killer whales, which despite their names are actually the largest of the dolphins. It's increasingly hard to buy Sea World's contention that killer whales are happy colleagues of their human captors in this whole training and entertainment business.
OPINION
March 21, 2014
Re "San Diego hails Sea World with proclamation," March 19, and "A long focus on 'Blackfish,'" Column One, March 18 Forcing a multi-ton whale to live in a tank is tantamount to confining a 5-year-old child to a dog crate. The latter would result in prosecution and imprisonment of the perpetrator. I was feeling some relief after reading in Tuesday's Times the piece about the success of Gabriela Cowperthwaite's film "Blackfish," and then came Wednesday's knock-back headline, "San Diego hails Sea World with proclamation.
OPINION
March 14, 2014
Re "Dim view of orca bill in San Diego," March 9 Breeding, capturing, selling or imprisoning orcas should be banned. Most of all, forcing them to perform should be illegal. These magnificent denizens of the deep (and not of Sea World's shallow ponds) are the slaves of the animal world. Forced to perform unnatural acts for food and care, they are far from freedom in the pods to which they belong. The excuse that they are essential to the economy of San Diego is akin to one of the excuses for the sorry chapter of our past known as slavery.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1989 | GREGORY L. BECKMANN
Welcome to Sunday in the Parks with Calendar--the Sequel. And please fasten your seat belts. For our second annual survey of Southern California's major theme parks, our intrepid reporters visited the parks on a recent Sunday, unannounced. Accompanied by family or a friend, they bought tickets, stood in lines, sampled the park's rides and menus and withered in the heat. Afterward, they put in calls to the various park publicists for assistance in compiling our comparison chart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1985 | DAVID FREED, Times Staff Writer
Sea World of San Diego, whose five-year permit to capture Alaskan killer whales was declared invalid last week by a federal judge, will likely either appeal the judge's decision, file for a new permit or seek to import whales captured outside of U.S. territorial waters. That was the assessment offered Tuesday by David M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2014 | By Tony Perry
 SAN DIEGO -- People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals has filed a lawsuit against the San Diego Airport Authority after PETA's anti-SeaWorld advertisement was rejected for display at Lindbergh Field. PETA sought to buy space at the airport terminal for an ad featuring actress Kathy Najimy ("Sister Act," "Hocus Pocus") asking people to avoid SeaWorld "if you like animals like I do. " PETA is backed by the ACLU. "While the government has some authority to regulate advertising, this is an example of the government abusing that authority and unfairly discriminating against the message of a specific advertiser," said ACLU senior staff attorney Sean Riordan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- A bill by a Santa Monica assemblyman that would ban orca shows at SeaWorld is being blasted in San Diego, home of the marine theme park. SeaWorld expressed doubt about the legality of the legislation. "The premise behind this proposed legislation is severely flawed on multiple levels, and its validity is highly questionable under the U.S. and California constitutions," the park said in a statement. Others said the ban would hurt the local economy. "SeaWorld is a critical part of San Diego's economy," said San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer, a Republican who made job growth a key part of his recent campaign.
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