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SCIENCE
May 24, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Microbes have been found living at a record depth of a mile beneath the Atlantic seabed in a hint that life might also evolve underground on other planets, scientists said Thursday. The discovery of prokaryotic microbes in searing hot sediments under the seabed off Newfoundland, Canada, doubles the previous depth record of 2,760 feet, according to experts in Wales and France writing in the journal Science.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
April 14, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - Investigators looking for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 have put away their towed pinger locator and are about to call off searches for surface debris. Now, it's all up to a little yellow robotic submarine to find the missing Boeing 777 in an area bigger than the city of Los Angeles. Technicians aboard the Australian ship Ocean Shield on Monday afternoon deployed the Bluefin-21 underwater autonomous vehicle in the Indian Ocean, sending it almost three miles down to the seabed and using its side-scanning sonar arrays to look for wreckage from the plane.  “It is time to go underwater,” retired Air Chief Marshal Angus Houston, who is coordinating the search from Perth, Australia, said in announcing the new phase of operations.  Unless the robot sub gets lucky, the process could take a while: The U.S. Navy, which lent the Bluefin-21 to the search team, said mapping the area where the plane most likely disappeared could take six weeks to two months.  The 16-foot, 1,650-pound sub moves at a walking pace and will be searching an area of about 600 square miles.
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NEWS
May 24, 1989
A huge earthquake ruptured a stretch of seabed about 125 miles north of Macquarie Island, midway between Australia and Antarctica, officials reported. The Australian Seismological Center said the quake had a magnitude of 7.2. The U.S. Geological Survey, which said the temblor was the strongest anywhere in the world this year, put the reading at 8.2. The Australian center said a stretch of seabed from 30 to 60 miles long and up to two miles deep apparently had ruptured, with one geological plate sliding over another.
SCIENCE
August 9, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
If you ever wondered what the ocean floor looks like off the California coast, there are now 87,000 photos and more than 500 hours of video available for online viewing. Collected by the U.S. Geological Survey as part of an ambitious program to map near-shore state waters, the photographs and video show selected areas of the seabed extending the entire length of the state. The images were taken by cameras towed 3 feet above the ocean floor to aid the interpretation of sonar data.
WORLD
February 21, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A French battleship sunk by a German submarine during World War I has been discovered in remarkable condition on the Mediterranean seabed off the Italian island of Sardinia, officials said. The 410-foot-long Danton was one of the largest French naval vessels of its era. It was spotted by a company conducting an underwater survey for a gas pipeline between Algeria and Italy. The pipeline builder, Galsi, said in a statement that many of the ship's gun turrets were still intact. It said the Danton was sitting upright under more than 1,000 yards of water 22 miles southwest of Sardinia.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2000
The May 1 article "In Castro's Cuba, Internet Hookups Are Few and Far Between" by Scott Doggett suggests that the poor Internet access in Cuba is mostly due to communism and state control of access. Apparently un-researched by the author is the fact that of the six new regional seabed fiber-optic telecommunications cables being installed or planned for installation from 1999 to 2001, all avoid landings in Cuba. Most contain a short "stub" for eventual access and landing rights, however, U.S. law precludes any of these transoceanic and regional systems from touching Cuban soil as an extension of the U.S. boycott.
OPINION
July 18, 2002
Two sentences into "Drop Bid to Revive the Dying Salton Sea" (by Brent M. Haddad and Christopher J. Brown, Commentary, July 14) and I was upset. By the end of the article I was incensed. That "there is virtually nothing that can stop that" [the death of the Salton Sea] is patently wrong. For there is a solution. And it is win/win/win. Bring water from the Sea of Cortez. It is less salty than the Salton Sea. It is at sea level. The Salton Sea is more than 200 feet below sea level. Win for the sea, for the birds, for recreation, for jobs (anyone care about jobs anymore?
WORLD
September 16, 2013 | By Tom Kington
GIGLIO, Italy - Twenty months after it capsized off the Italian coast in a disaster that killed 32 people, the Costa Concordia cruise ship emerged from the Mediterranean on Monday thanks to a painstaking $800-million salvage effort. Fifty-six giant pulleys slowly heaved the half-submerged vessel back to an upright position in a 19-hour operation that went into the early hours of Tuesday, revealing a section of hull darkened by rust and algae during months underwater. "The rotation has finished its course, we are at zero degrees, the ship is resting on the platforms," said Italy's civil protection chief, Franco Gabrielli, at a 4 a.m. news conference on Giglio island, where he was applauded and cheered by residents.
NEWS
March 12, 1995 | Reuters
The world's industrialized nations want a bigger voice on the United Nations International Seabed Authority group's 36-seat governing council, sources said Friday. The demand has reportedly stalled the first working session of the 160-nation body.
NEWS
July 7, 1998 | Associated Press
Russia and Kazakhstan signed an agreement here that divides the northern part of the Caspian seabed into separate Russian and Kazakh sectors. The three other Caspian nations--Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan and Iran--were not part of the settlement, but the deal could set the tone for additional agreements. Caspian oil reserves are vast, but developing the fields has been set back by legal disputes and the lack of adequate pipelines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2012 | By Kenneth R. Weiss, Los Angeles Times
Federal officials Thursday proposed a massive expansion to federal protection of waters off Northern California from offshore oil drilling, seabed mining and ocean dumping. The proposal would more than double the size of the national marine sanctuaries around the Cordell Bank and the Farallon Islands. When combined with the massive Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, the newly expanded system would protect more than a third of California's offshore waters from oil drilling, from Cambria in San Luis Obispo County to Point Arena in Mendocino County.
NATIONAL
July 17, 2010 | By Bettina Boxall and Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
BP gingerly moved ahead with tests of its newly sealed oil well Friday, stepping up scans of the seafloor for leaks that would signal potential problems with a containment operation that has rarely gone as planned. The gusher of oil that has been fouling the gulf since late April was turned off Thursday when BP closed a valve on a new well cap, erasing the roiling clouds of crude that day after day have fed the largest oil spill in U.S. history. But the deep-sea video scenes of clear water may be temporary.
WORLD
February 21, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A French battleship sunk by a German submarine during World War I has been discovered in remarkable condition on the Mediterranean seabed off the Italian island of Sardinia, officials said. The 410-foot-long Danton was one of the largest French naval vessels of its era. It was spotted by a company conducting an underwater survey for a gas pipeline between Algeria and Italy. The pipeline builder, Galsi, said in a statement that many of the ship's gun turrets were still intact. It said the Danton was sitting upright under more than 1,000 yards of water 22 miles southwest of Sardinia.
SCIENCE
May 24, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Microbes have been found living at a record depth of a mile beneath the Atlantic seabed in a hint that life might also evolve underground on other planets, scientists said Thursday. The discovery of prokaryotic microbes in searing hot sediments under the seabed off Newfoundland, Canada, doubles the previous depth record of 2,760 feet, according to experts in Wales and France writing in the journal Science.
NEWS
September 30, 2007 | Llazar Semini, Associated Press
saranda, albania -- Encrusted with tiny shells and smelling strongly of the sea, a 2,400-year-old Greek jar lies in a saltwater bath in Durres Museum, on Albania's Adriatic coast. Part of a sunken shipment of as many as 60 ceramic vessels, the 26-inch storage jar, or amphora, was the top find from what organizers say is the first archaeological survey of this small Balkan nation's seabed, conducted by U.S. and Albanian experts. "Touch it, touch it.
NEWS
July 15, 2007 | William Mullen, Chicago Tribune
Dropped into a hole melted through 267 feet of floating ice, a diamond-toothed drill had to travel another 2,776 feet through seawater before reaching the bottom of an offshore moat in Antarctica. There, it pierced the ocean floor and began to drill back in time. It extracted a core sample about 3 inches in diameter and brought it up to a derrick built atop the Ross Ice Shelf.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1985 | United Press International
A French survey ship equipped with an advanced submarine craft arrived in Japan Friday to participate in a joint Japanese-French exploration of the sea bottom around Japan beginning June 1. The 2,200-ton Nadir, carrying a deep-sea submersible, pulled into Shimizu west of Tokyo to prepare for the two-month survey. The project is the second phase of a joint Japanese-French undertaking, dubbed "Kaiko" (sea trench), designed to collect data that could some day help predict killer earthquakes.
NEWS
November 26, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The Navy returned the wreck of the Japanese fishing vessel Ehime Maru to the Pacific floor after recovering the bodies of all but one person killed when it was sunk by a U.S. submarine, the Navy said. The Ehime Maru was towed out to sea by a giant barge. The wreck was then released 12 nautical miles south of Oahu, Hawaii, Navy officials said. The move completed an expensive salvage and recovery mission triggered by one of the Navy's most embarrassing peacetime accidents.
SCIENCE
September 3, 2006 | Robert Lee Hotz, Times Staff Writer
Buffeted by crosswinds, the lone helicopter flew on for an hour across the shale-gray waves of the North Sea with no destination in sight. A relief crew huddled unsteadily inside, sweating in their 20-pound immersion suits, festooned with safety whistles, buddy lines, emergency lights and inflatable life vests. Even in summer, survival in the choppy 40-degree water is measured in minutes.
OPINION
July 18, 2002
Two sentences into "Drop Bid to Revive the Dying Salton Sea" (by Brent M. Haddad and Christopher J. Brown, Commentary, July 14) and I was upset. By the end of the article I was incensed. That "there is virtually nothing that can stop that" [the death of the Salton Sea] is patently wrong. For there is a solution. And it is win/win/win. Bring water from the Sea of Cortez. It is less salty than the Salton Sea. It is at sea level. The Salton Sea is more than 200 feet below sea level. Win for the sea, for the birds, for recreation, for jobs (anyone care about jobs anymore?
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