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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Bird watchers on Friday were following what for them is the event of a lifetime: the discovery of a new species of seabird. The existence of the sparrow-sized black-and-white species of storm petrel was confirmed in February near the coastal community of Puerto Montt, Chile, according to noted ornithologist Peter Harrison, who announced the find during a ceremony hosted by the San Diego Bird Festival/Audubon California Assembly in San Diego....
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
The sardine fishing boat Eileen motored slowly through moonlit waters from San Pedro to Santa Catalina Island, its weary-eyed captain growing more desperate as the night wore on. After 12 hours and $1,000 worth of fuel, Corbin Hanson and his crew returned to port without a single fish. "Tonight's pretty reflective of how things have been going," Hanson said. "Not very well. " To blame is the biggest sardine crash in generations, which has made schools of the small, silvery fish a rarity on the West Coast.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2012 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
Oil seeping from the ocean floor off Santa Barbara is taking a toll on seabirds that are turning up by the dozens along the Southern California coastline coated in crude oil and tar. The naturally occurring oil bubbles up and afflicts birds every winter, but wildlife rescuers in recent weeks have seen an unusual influx of oiled seabirds stranded on the shore as far south as Orange County, with the region's main rehabilitation center in San Pedro...
SCIENCE
January 24, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Wild Adelie penguins have killer appetites - and they rarely miss a target. Neither fish nor krill can escape the Antarctic seabirds, according to scientists who outfitted them with cameras to spy on their feeding habits. Understanding an animal's feeding patterns can be crucial to gauging the population's health and survival. The study, published this week in PNAS, provides a look at the foraging patterns of these penguins and provides future researchers with a way to study other penguins' mysterious eating habits.
NATIONAL
February 5, 2010 | By Kim Murphy
All along the Oregon coast over the last month, hundreds of brown pelicans have turned up dead, starving or begging for food. As many as 1,000 of the gangly seabirds failed to make their annual fall migration to California, many instead winding up at Oregon's rehabilitation centers. Those that did head south, leaving the Pacific Northwest winter behind, were battered by California's recent storms. Shelters in San Pedro and the San Francisco Bay Area are also full of emaciated pelicans.
SCIENCE
January 24, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Wild Adelie penguins have killer appetites - and they rarely miss a target. Neither fish nor krill can escape the Antarctic seabirds, according to scientists who outfitted them with cameras to spy on their feeding habits. Understanding an animal's feeding patterns can be crucial to gauging the population's health and survival. The study, published this week in PNAS, provides a look at the foraging patterns of these penguins and provides future researchers with a way to study other penguins' mysterious eating habits.
NEWS
February 22, 2005 | Scott Doggett
Two members of Congress introduced a bill to open the Farallon National Wildlife Refuge to visitors. But scientists say the 211-acre island refuge off the San Francisco coast should remain off-limits to the public to protect marine mammals, including the endangered Steller sea lion, and the largest seabird breeding colony in the lower 48 states.
OPINION
November 22, 2002
"Biologists Hatch New Plan for Condors" (Nov. 11) implies that the breeding condors are not quality birds -- and that this is the reason they are feeding their chicks trash and ultimately failing to raise their chicks successfully. The following may enlighten you about how other wildlife are faring with the amount of trash humans discard thoughtlessly. Numerous species of whales have been found dead with plastic bags and balloons in their stomachs; sea turtles all over the world suffer a similar fate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2007 | From the Associated Press
MARINA, Calif. -- More than 150 seabirds are sick and 26 have died recently at Marina State Beach, apparently of starvation. David Jessup of the state Department of Fish and Game said Wednesday that Northern fulmars in Central California are thin or emaciated. Most of the ill birds are young; the famine could result from a mysterious change in the food chain. Some have signs of poxvirus infection, and three have an oily substance researchers hadn't yet identified.
NATIONAL
October 21, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service confirmed that it would propose taking the marbled murrelet, a small seabird at the center of political battles over logging in the Northwest, off the threatened species list. The proposal, to be formally made by the end of the year, would start a yearlong evaluation. The bird lives at sea but nests in trees near the coast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2013 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
LA JOLLA - There's a political stink rising in this seaside community, blown ashore from the rocks of La Jolla Cove, where myriad seabirds and marine mammals roost, rest and leave behind what animals leave behind. The offal accumulation is offending noses at trendy restaurants, tourist haunts, and expensive condos perched on some of the most pricey real estate in the country. But finding a solution to the olfactory assault has proved elusive. Environmental regulations have thwarted proposals to cleanse the rocks with a non-toxic, biodegradable solution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2012 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
Oil seeping from the ocean floor off Santa Barbara is taking a toll on seabirds that are turning up by the dozens along the Southern California coastline coated in crude oil and tar. The naturally occurring oil bubbles up and afflicts birds every winter, but wildlife rescuers in recent weeks have seen an unusual influx of oiled seabirds stranded on the shore as far south as Orange County, with the region's main rehabilitation center in San Pedro...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2011 | By Kenneth R. Weiss, Los Angeles Times
Thick, tarry fuel oil disgorged into San Francisco Bay from a damaged cargo ship in 2007 was surprisingly toxic to fish embryos, devastating the herring population that feeds seabirds, whales and the bay's last commercial fishery, scientists reported Monday. Although the bay's herring spawning grounds are now free of toxic oil, studies have found that the moderate-size spill of 54,000 gallons had an unexpectedly large and lethal effect. The culprit, a common type of ship fuel called "bunker fuel," appears to be especially toxic to fish embryos, particularly when exposed to sunlight, according to a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
WORLD
October 17, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
A stricken cargo ship carrying tons of oil threatened to break apart off the coast of New Zealand late Monday and dislodge from the reef it rammed this month. Salvage crews halted attempts to pump oil from the Liberian-flagged Rena as weather in the area worsened. The ship, which ran aground Oct. 5 on a reef 14 miles offshore, has spilled tons of heavy oil that has washed up on pristine beaches near the town of Tauranga on New Zealand's North Island. But rough seas have stymied salvage efforts: An estimated 85 to 100 tons of oil has been removed from the listing ship, while 1,400 additional tons of fuel remains aboard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
It cost the Port of Los Angeles roughly $350,000 to make a windswept spit of sand on the southeastern edge of the world's largest container terminal as welcoming as possible for a breeding colony of endangered California least terns. Among the special touches installed in January at Pier 400 were chick fences; tons of carefully groomed imported sand; and predator controls, including live traps to keep out raccoons, feral cats and crows. Things didn't work out as planned. On a recent weekday, port biologist Kathleen Keane surveyed the 15-acre site through binoculars and shook her head in disappointment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Bird watchers on Friday were following what for them is the event of a lifetime: the discovery of a new species of seabird. The existence of the sparrow-sized black-and-white species of storm petrel was confirmed in February near the coastal community of Puerto Montt, Chile, according to noted ornithologist Peter Harrison, who announced the find during a ceremony hosted by the San Diego Bird Festival/Audubon California Assembly in San Diego....
NEWS
October 22, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hundreds of thousands of Alaskan seabirds are thought to have starved to death because of El Nino, the Pacific weather phenomenon tilting nature off-balance, U.S. scientists said. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said clues all pointed to El Nino in the deaths of seabirds washed ashore from the Gulf of Alaska to the Chukchi Sea this summer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Scientists are stumped about why thousands of rare seabirds are suddenly being spotted on land in Northern California. Red phalaropes live many miles off the Pacific Coast and usually land only in the Arctic, where they breed and raise their young. But bird enthusiasts began spotting the birds in Sonoma County on Christmas Day, and flocks have since been reported in residential neighborhoods of San Francisco, Palo Alto and Los Gatos, among other areas.
NATIONAL
May 16, 2010 | By Bettina Boxall and Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
Biologist Dennis Takahashi-Kelso peered into the cobalt waters of the Gulf of Mexico 20 miles off the Louisiana coast. The only sign of pollution was a plastic bag floating beneath the surface. More than three weeks after the Deepwater Horizon rig exploded, resulting in a leak spewing 210,000 gallons of crude per day into the gulf, the fouled beaches and dead seabirds that are the hallmarks of catastrophic spills have yet to materialize. But Takahashi-Kelso, who was Alaska's commissioner of Environmental Conservation at the time of the Exxon Valdez disaster, warned: "It's going to be bad."
NATIONAL
February 5, 2010 | By Kim Murphy
All along the Oregon coast over the last month, hundreds of brown pelicans have turned up dead, starving or begging for food. As many as 1,000 of the gangly seabirds failed to make their annual fall migration to California, many instead winding up at Oregon's rehabilitation centers. Those that did head south, leaving the Pacific Northwest winter behind, were battered by California's recent storms. Shelters in San Pedro and the San Francisco Bay Area are also full of emaciated pelicans.
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