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Seabrook Nuclear Power Plant

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NEWS
June 5, 1989 | From Associated Press
Hundreds of opponents of nuclear power swarmed over or crawled under the outer perimeter fence at the Seabrook nuclear power plant Sunday, and police made 627 arrests without resistance. Meanwhile, engineers hit a snag when a problem developed in a water feed pump valve. The problem, officials said, has put the countdown for the plant's first atomic chain reaction on hold. The demonstrators, including children and a woman in a wheelchair, climbed or were helped over the seven-foot chain-link barrier at three points.
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NEWS
April 12, 1994 | Associated Press
A gust from an air lock knocked down a group of workers at the Seabrook nuclear plant, slightly injuring 11, authorities said. The accident Sunday afternoon occurred when hydraulically operated doors were being opened after the plant was shut down for refueling. An air lock is an airtight compartment between places that do not have the same air pressure. Two workers were treated at a hospital for minor injuries, and nine others received cuts and bruises, a spokesman said.
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NEWS
November 24, 1990 | Associated Press
The Seabrook nuclear power plant was restarted Friday after a two-week shutdown to repair a series of technical malfunctions, a plant spokesman said. He said the plant was operating at 18% of reactor capacity but that power was being increased and was expected to reach full capability by today.
NEWS
July 4, 1992 | Reuters
A fire broke out on the grounds of the Seabrook nuclear power plant Thursday, officials said Friday. The small blaze occurred about 50 feet from the plant's cooling tower and less than 500 feet from the core reactor building, officials said. No radiation was released and plant operation was unaffected.
NEWS
July 4, 1992 | Reuters
A fire broke out on the grounds of the Seabrook nuclear power plant Thursday, officials said Friday. The small blaze occurred about 50 feet from the plant's cooling tower and less than 500 feet from the core reactor building, officials said. No radiation was released and plant operation was unaffected.
NEWS
October 18, 1986 | United Press International
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission granted a license Friday for reactor fuel loading at the Seabrook nuclear power plant in a move expected to speed the start of the facility's commercial operation. The license lets Seabrook's builders load uranium fuel rods into the reactor for tests, but does not allow the generation of power.
NEWS
April 29, 1990 | Associated Press
Seabrook nuclear power plant officials on Saturday ordered the reactor shut down for four to six weeks of modifications, shortly before the long-delayed plant was to produce its first commercial electricity. Seabrook officials decided that electrical feedback from the New England power grid could cause a section of the plant's turbine to vibrate beyond specifications, plant spokesman David Scanzoni said. He said the problem did not involve the reactor.
NEWS
June 22, 1990 | United Press International
Technicians at the Seabrook nuclear power plant were working Thursday to determine the reason for the $6.5-billion facility's first automatic shutdown, a spokesman said. Seabrook was operating at 30% power, producing about 210 megawatts, when its turbine automatically shut down Wednesday afternoon. Plant spokesman Rob Williams said that, when the turbine disconnected itself from the New England power grid, the reactor shut down automatically.
NEWS
June 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
X-rays of nine welds at New Hampshire's Seabrook nuclear power plant are of poor quality and cannot be used to determine whether the welds are in compliance with safety codes, a newspaper reported. A Nuclear Regulatory Commission report provided to the Boston Globe indicated that the X-rays lacked clarity or had other deficiencies.
NEWS
July 16, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
The Seabrook nuclear power plant reached 90% of its capacity, and engineers expect the controversial facility to reach full power within a few days, a Seabrook spokesman said. The announcement of the highest power level attained thus far by the $6.5-billion plant coincided with the publication of a poll that shows opposition to Seabrook among New Hampshire residents appears to be decreasing. The plant produced electricity for the first time in May.
NEWS
June 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
X-rays of nine welds at New Hampshire's Seabrook nuclear power plant are of poor quality and cannot be used to determine whether the welds are in compliance with safety codes, a newspaper reported. A Nuclear Regulatory Commission report provided to the Boston Globe indicated that the X-rays lacked clarity or had other deficiencies.
NEWS
May 4, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Opponents of the Seabrook nuclear power plant said they have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn the plant's license. Seabrook received its full-power license from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in March, 1990, and that license was upheld by an appeals court in January. A Seabrook spokesman said issues raised by the opponents had been already resolved by the court of appeals.
NEWS
November 29, 1990 | From United Press International
The Federal Emergency Management Agency has given final approval to New Hampshire emergency plans in the event of an accident at the Seabrook nuclear power plant, a state emergency management official said Wednesday. The plan, which fills 37 volumes, spells out in detail the emergency procedures for each of the 17 New Hampshire towns within Seabrook's emergency planning zone.
NEWS
November 24, 1990 | Associated Press
The Seabrook nuclear power plant was restarted Friday after a two-week shutdown to repair a series of technical malfunctions, a plant spokesman said. He said the plant was operating at 18% of reactor capacity but that power was being increased and was expected to reach full capability by today.
NEWS
August 17, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is investigating whether its decision to grant a full-power license for the Seabrook nuclear power plant was "corruptly induced," agency documents say. An Aug. 7 memo said the NRC inspector general's office was interviewing staff members about Nov. 9, 1989, rulings by the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board. The board recommended that the plant in Seabrook, N.H., receive a full-power license and it approved evacuation plans.
NEWS
June 22, 1990 | United Press International
Technicians at the Seabrook nuclear power plant were working Thursday to determine the reason for the $6.5-billion facility's first automatic shutdown, a spokesman said. Seabrook was operating at 30% power, producing about 210 megawatts, when its turbine automatically shut down Wednesday afternoon. Plant spokesman Rob Williams said that, when the turbine disconnected itself from the New England power grid, the reactor shut down automatically.
NEWS
December 26, 1986
Allegations of shoddy workmanship and drug and alcohol abuse at the Seabrook nuclear power plant in New Hampshire either were unsubstantiated or remedied by plant management, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission reported. The report followed an NRC investigation into charges by the Massachusetts-based Employees Legal Project of substance abuse among some construction workers at the $5-billion plant, which is completed but not operating.
NEWS
April 29, 1990 | Associated Press
Seabrook nuclear power plant officials on Saturday ordered the reactor shut down for four to six weeks of modifications, shortly before the long-delayed plant was to produce its first commercial electricity. Seabrook officials decided that electrical feedback from the New England power grid could cause a section of the plant's turbine to vibrate beyond specifications, plant spokesman David Scanzoni said. He said the problem did not involve the reactor.
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