Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSeafirst Corp
IN THE NEWS

Seafirst Corp

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
September 21, 1990 | JAMES BATES
Richard P. Cooley, 66, who helped BankAmerica Corp. turn the once-struggling Seafirst Corp. into one of the San Francisco banking firm's most profitable units, announced that he is retiring as head of the Seattle unit at year-end. Cooley is chairman and chief executive of Seafirst Corp. and Seattle-First National Bank. Luke Helms, 46, president of Seafirst's Seattle-First National Bank, will succeed Cooley, who led Seafirst for seven years. Kevin B.
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 26, 1987
Victor F. Zonana's very fine article concerning the model that Seafirst Corp. has set for BankAmerica ("Seafirst Comeback Offers Model for Rescuer B of A," March 29) mainly indicates that Zonana is far too diplomatic. From the article itself, it is completely apparent that B of A already had a magnificent bank manager in the organization when the board of directors decided to bring back A. W. Clausen to head the parent company. Richard P. Cooley, Seafirst's chairman, has a longstanding record of banking excellence.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1990 | JAMES BATES
Richard P. Cooley, 66, who helped BankAmerica Corp. turn the once-struggling Seafirst Corp. into one of the San Francisco banking firm's most profitable units, announced that he is retiring as head of the Seattle unit at year-end. Cooley is chairman and chief executive of Seafirst Corp. and Seattle-First National Bank. Luke Helms, 46, president of Seafirst's Seattle-First National Bank, will succeed Cooley, who led Seafirst for seven years. Kevin B.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1990 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wells Fargo & Co. won federal regulatory approval Monday to buy two California banks, overcoming protests from civil rights and minority business groups that tried to block the acquisitions by alleging that the bank does not do enough for the poor and minorities. The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and the Federal Reserve Board approved Wells Fargo's planned $160-million purchase of Bakersfield-based Central Pacific Corp. and its American National Bank subsidiary.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1989 | BILL DIETRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When maverick Seattle skyscraper developer Martin Selig fell behind on his light bill last winter, his competitors figured that he might be in trouble. And when nearly $1 million in mortgage checks on five of his buildings bounced this summer, they were pretty well convinced. But by mid-October, Selig was back in the black, although he was no longer literally on top of this city's hot commercial real estate market.
BUSINESS
March 29, 1987 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, Times Staff Writer
In 1982, Seafirst Corp. seemed to be fulfilling its corporate destiny when it announced a deal to move its headquarters into a planned 76-story office building here. After all, Seafirst towered over its competition as the biggest bank in the Pacific Northwest, boasting a 20-year string of rising profits. It had transcended its humble regional roots and was a strutting player on the world stage. What could be more fitting than occupying the tallest building on the West Coast?
BUSINESS
April 28, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
BankAmerica Names a New Vice Chairman: BankAmerica Corp. said it has named Luke Helms, chairman and chief executive of its Seafirst Corp. subsidiary, to be a vice chairman. The San Francisco company said Helms will be in charge of affiliate banks outside California. Helms assumes his new job on Aug. 1 and will also become a member of BankAmerica's managing committee. He will be succeeded at Seafirst by John Rindlaub, now a BankAmerica executive vice president and head of its Asia division.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1990 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wells Fargo & Co. won federal regulatory approval Monday to buy two California banks, overcoming protests from civil rights and minority business groups that tried to block the acquisitions by alleging that the bank does not do enough for the poor and minorities. The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and the Federal Reserve Board approved Wells Fargo's planned $160-million purchase of Bakersfield-based Central Pacific Corp. and its American National Bank subsidiary.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1989 | BILL DIETRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When maverick Seattle skyscraper developer Martin Selig fell behind on his light bill last winter, his competitors figured that he might be in trouble. And when nearly $1 million in mortgage checks on five of his buildings bounced this summer, they were pretty well convinced. But by mid-October, Selig was back in the black, although he was no longer literally on top of this city's hot commercial real estate market.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1987
Victor F. Zonana's very fine article concerning the model that Seafirst Corp. has set for BankAmerica ("Seafirst Comeback Offers Model for Rescuer B of A," March 29) mainly indicates that Zonana is far too diplomatic. From the article itself, it is completely apparent that B of A already had a magnificent bank manager in the organization when the board of directors decided to bring back A. W. Clausen to head the parent company. Richard P. Cooley, Seafirst's chairman, has a longstanding record of banking excellence.
BUSINESS
March 29, 1987 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, Times Staff Writer
In 1982, Seafirst Corp. seemed to be fulfilling its corporate destiny when it announced a deal to move its headquarters into a planned 76-story office building here. After all, Seafirst towered over its competition as the biggest bank in the Pacific Northwest, boasting a 20-year string of rising profits. It had transcended its humble regional roots and was a strutting player on the world stage. What could be more fitting than occupying the tallest building on the West Coast?
BUSINESS
November 21, 1985
The agency said the downgrading affects about $4 billion of outstanding debt securities and $2 billion of shelf registrations of BankAmerica, parent of Bank of America. S&P said it took the action because of the bank's heavy loan losses and continuing problem loans in agriculture, real estate, shipping and to developing countries. Downgraded were B of A senior debt to A- from A+, subordinated debt to BBB+ from A, preferred stock to BBB- from A- and commercial paper to A-2 from A-1.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1987 | From Wire and Staff Reports
A major Wall Street credit rating firm has lowered its ratings on about $5.5 billion in short- and long-term debt issued by BankAmerica, the nation's second-largest bank holding company. Moody's Investors Service lowered the ratings slightly on BankAmerica senior subordinated debt, preferred stock, commercial paper and the senior and subordinated debt of BankAmerica Overseas Finance Corp.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|