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Seagate Technology

BUSINESS
May 26, 2000 | KAREN ALEXANDER and ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Seagate Technology Inc., the leading maker of disk drives for personal computers, said Thursday that it is closing its Anaheim manufacturing plant and dismissing nearly all of its 621 workers there. The Scotts Valley company said the Anaheim plant, along with a facility in Mexicali, Mexico, with 591 employees, will be shut down this summer. The work will be consolidated at a Seagate plant in Limavady, Ireland, that will manufacture nearly all of its disk drives.
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BUSINESS
May 26, 2000 | From Times Staff Reports
Seagate Technology Inc., the leading maker of disk drives for personal computers, said Thursday it is closing its Anaheim manufacturing plant and dismissing nearly all of its 621 workers there. The Scotts Valley, Calif., company said the Anaheim plant, along with one in Mexicali, Mexico, that has 591 employees, will be shut down this summer. The work will be consolidated at a Seagate plant in Limavady, Ireland, which will manufacture nearly all of its disk drives.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2000 | DUNCAN MARTELL, REUTERS
Seagate Technology Inc. announced a $20-billion transaction Wednesday that would take the world's largest computer disk-drive maker private and sell its 33% stake in fast-growing Veritas Software Inc. back to Veritas. Under the complex deal, Veritas, a Mountain View, Calif.
BUSINESS
September 4, 1999 | Bloomberg News
Seagate Technology Inc. said it will buy the rest of its software unit, gaining control of an investment it can use for acquisitions or sell to raise cash. The company will acquire the 6.5% of its Seagate software unit it doesn't now own for 8 million shares, or about $280 million, and take a $216-million charge as a result. Seagate also will get full ownership of 61 million shares of Veritas Software Corp. shares, valued at about $4 billion, owned by the software unit.
BUSINESS
July 19, 1999 | JONATHAN GAW, Jonathan Gaw covers technology and electronic commerce for The Times. He can be reached at (714) 966-7818 and at jonathan.gaw@latimes.com
Continuing the digital version of the quest to find how many angels can fit on a pin, Seagate Technology Inc. today announces that it can now pack enough data on a normal floppy disk to play music continuously for more than 22 days. The breakthrough, squeezing 23.
BUSINESS
July 19, 1999 | JONATHAN GAW
Continuing the digital version of the quest to find how many angels can fit on a pin, Seagate Technology Inc. today will announce that it can pack enough data on a normal floppy disk to play music continuously for more than 22 days. The breakthrough, squeezing 23.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1999 | Reuters
Seagate Technology Inc., the world's largest disk drive maker, reported sharply improved earnings that beat even the most optimistic expectations, helped by cost-cutting and a rebound in the computer-storage industry. Net income jumped to $104 million, or 42 cents a share, for the company's second quarter ended Jan. 1 this year, contrasted with a loss of $183 million, or 75 cents a share, the previous year. Scotts Valley-based Seagate boosted its revenue in the quarter to $1.8 billion from $1.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1998
Seagate Technology Inc., the world's largest independent maker of computer disk drives, said it will close its semiconductor factory in Livingston, Scotland, next year, eliminating 263 jobs. Seagate failed to find a buyer for the 75,000-square-foot factory after putting it up for sale this month. The Livingston site is Seagate's only semiconductor plant. Seagate has about 86,000 employees worldwide. Shares of the Scotts Valley-based company rose 13 cents to close at $24.13 on the NYSE.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1998 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Irvine-based Western Digital Corp. on Monday reported its steepest quarterly loss ever, a deficit of $194.7 million that was highlighted by a one-time charge for anticipated increases in warranty charges. The company, the third-largest independent manufacturer of computer disk drives, has been bogged down by a combination of falling prices and softer demand for desktop computers, the crisis in Asian economies and its own missteps as far back as two years ago.
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