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Seal Beach Ca Budget

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1993 | SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Three days after the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station was placed on the Pentagon's "hit list," city officials have decided against launching an immediate campaign to keep it open, saying such a move would be premature and unproductive. Rather, City Council members and community leaders moved Monday to assure concerned residents that being placed on the Defense Base Closure and Realignment list does not necessarily mean that the base will close.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1999 | Harrison Sheppard, (714) 966-5977
The City Council is considering a $26.4-million budget for 1999-2000, representing a 4% increase over the current fiscal year's budget. The city operating budget's biggest increase is for the Police Department, up 5.4% to $5.1 million, but the department is also bringing in additional revenue with a new traffic officer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1997 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
The city's $12.5-million budget is balanced, though "somewhat precariously," City Manager Keith Till said this week of the spending plan for fiscal 1997-98. "The revenue stream is adequate, provided we keep tight reins on expenditures, and there are no unforeseen major emergencies," Till said. The single largest concern is the 11% utility tax, which represents nearly a third of general fund revenue. Southern California Edison Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1998 | PHIL DAVIS
Despite a shrinking pool of income, the city should still be able to squeak through the 1998-99 fiscal year with a $13.4-million budget, City Manager Keith Till told the City Council this week. The council approved the budget 4 to 0. Till delivered his annual budget report with a series of slides that showed cracked sidewalks, rusted sewer lines and other "deferred maintenance" problems the city has been putting off for decades. The budget sets aside $6.4 million for capital improvements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1996 | RUSS LOAR
There is no end in sight for the city's unpopular 11% utility tax. That's the message City Manager Keith Till delivered to council members this week who approved a bare-bones $12.2-million spending plan for the 1996-97 fiscal year. The new budget provides only partial funding for legally required reserve accounts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1995 | RUSS LOAR
When volunteers offered earlier this year to build and help staff a safety office at the pier, the city accepted gladly, seeing the proposal as a way to help reduce beach crime at no added cost. Despite pledges of time and materials, however, the city might have to pick up part of the tab after all, officials said this week. City Council Member William J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1994
The city's $9-million budget for 1994-95 comes up for discussion tonight, but few fireworks are expected. City officials said the budget is similar to the one proposed last year and calls for no new taxes or significant cuts in city services. City Manager Jerry L. Bankston had hoped to begin building the city's reserves this year. But that process will be delayed for another year because of two unexpected expenses, the pier fire in May and a $300,000 sand-replenishment program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1994 | SHELBY GRAD
The City Council tonight will get its first look at the city's 1994-95 fiscal year budget. City officials don't expect the budget to include major cuts or layoffs even though Seal Beach faces more than $500,000 in unexpected expenses from May's pier fire and a sand replenishment program. Mayor George Brown predicted that the new budget will look similar to last year's $9.2-million general-fund spending plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1992 | MALAIKA BROWN
City Manager Jerry L. Bankston warned officials this week that cutbacks by the state could cost Seal Beach an additional $1.4 million in its budget for the next fiscal year, representing about 10% of the city's general fund. City officials said they do not plan to include the expected $1.4-million reduction in the budget they are preparing for the fiscal year that begins July 1. If a revision is necessary, they said the city would have to make cuts in vital services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 1992 | MALAIKA BROWN
After-school and summer recreation programs are some of the casualties of a pared-down but balanced city budget that officials have adopted. The mid-fiscal-year revision, approved unanimously by the City Council on Monday, chops more than $25,000 from recreational programs. This means that the city will not hire part-time workers who usually run drop-in activities such as after-school and summer programs, said Jack Osteen, director of parks and recreation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1997 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
The city's $12.5-million budget is balanced, though "somewhat precariously," City Manager Keith Till said this week of the spending plan for fiscal 1997-98. "The revenue stream is adequate, provided we keep tight reins on expenditures, and there are no unforeseen major emergencies," Till said. The single largest concern is the 11% utility tax, which represents nearly a third of general fund revenue. Southern California Edison Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1996 | RUSS LOAR
There is no end in sight for the city's unpopular 11% utility tax. That's the message City Manager Keith Till delivered to council members this week who approved a bare-bones $12.2-million spending plan for the 1996-97 fiscal year. The new budget provides only partial funding for legally required reserve accounts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1995 | RUSS LOAR
Parks and Recreation Director Andy Seymour, formerly a summer lifeguard in the city for more than 20 years, has resigned in the face of cost-cutting moves that were expected to eliminate his job. "We want to bring his position under another management-level supervisor," Mayor Marilyn Bruce Hastings said. "We are on a conservative path toward fiscal responsibility."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1995 | RUSS LOAR
When volunteers offered earlier this year to build and help staff a safety office at the pier, the city accepted gladly, seeing the proposal as a way to help reduce beach crime at no added cost. Despite pledges of time and materials, however, the city might have to pick up part of the tab after all, officials said this week. City Council Member William J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1995 | RUSS LOAR
City officials on Monday will consider cutting the highly unpopular 11% utility-users tax. The City Council more than doubled the tax two years ago to help close a $1.7-million budget shortfall but vowed to review the tax each year. Council members say it is the highest utility tax of any Orange County city. "There's going to be some people who come down to our meeting and throw that utility tax right in our faces," said Councilman William J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1994
The city's $9-million budget for 1994-95 comes up for discussion tonight, but few fireworks are expected. City officials said the budget is similar to the one proposed last year and calls for no new taxes or significant cuts in city services. City Manager Jerry L. Bankston had hoped to begin building the city's reserves this year. But that process will be delayed for another year because of two unexpected expenses, the pier fire in May and a $300,000 sand-replenishment program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1993 | SHELBY GRAD
Though a final spending plan won't be complete until September, city officials said that a preliminary 1993-94 fiscal year budget released this month offers a clear picture of the city's financial situation. The $9.2-million general-fund budget, which received tentative approval from the City Council two weeks ago, is a "status quo" budget that continues a three-year trend of staffing cutbacks and reduced expenditures, said City Manager Jerry L. Bankston.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1994 | SHELBY GRAD
The City Council tonight will get its first look at the city's 1994-95 fiscal year budget. City officials don't expect the budget to include major cuts or layoffs even though Seal Beach faces more than $500,000 in unexpected expenses from May's pier fire and a sand replenishment program. Mayor George Brown predicted that the new budget will look similar to last year's $9.2-million general-fund spending plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1993 | SHELBY GRAD
Though a final spending plan won't be complete until September, city officials said that a preliminary 1993-94 fiscal year budget released this month offers a clear picture of the city's financial situation. The $9.2-million general-fund budget, which received tentative approval from the City Council two weeks ago, is a "status quo" budget that continues a three-year trend of staffing cutbacks and reduced expenditures, said City Manager Jerry L. Bankston.
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