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Seal Beach Ca Landmarks

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1999 | Louise Roug, (714) 966-5977
It was built around 1910; it's no longer a home, but it's surprisingly mobile. The Krenwinkle House on Central Avenue may be moved to 7th Street and converted into a bed-and-breakfast, following a feasibility study by Chris Verholst, a Seal Beach resident. The move would be the second in the building's history. The house was originally built in Anaheim Bay, in an area which later became a naval base, prompting the first move of the house to Seal Beach in the 1942.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1999 | Louise Roug, (714) 966-5977
It was built around 1910; it's no longer a home, but it's surprisingly mobile. The Krenwinkle House on Central Avenue may be moved to 7th Street and converted into a bed-and-breakfast, following a feasibility study by Chris Verholst, a Seal Beach resident. The move would be the second in the building's history. The house was originally built in Anaheim Bay, in an area which later became a naval base, prompting the first move of the house to Seal Beach in the 1942.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1993 | SHELBY GRAD
Residents have launched a campaign to prevent an oil-change shop and carwash from being built next to the redwood water-tower house, an architectural landmark on Pacific Coast Highway in Sunset Beach. The effort comes after the Seal Beach Planning Commission last month approved a Santa Barbara developer's plan to develop a vacant lot next to the 52-year-old tower. Residents appealed the vote, meaning the City Council will eventually decide the issue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1996 | RUSS LOAR
One of the city's most visible landmarks, the City Hall clock tower, will be outfitted with cellular telephone relay equipment. But image-conscious council members say most of the equipment will be hidden from view. "This will not harm the integrity of our landmark," Mayor Marilyn Bruce Hastings said. "No one will ever know it's there." Officials said they are not sure when the clock tower was erected. The City Hall building was dedicated in 1969.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1995 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The crown jewel of Seal Beach, its 89-year-old wooden pier, has reopened permanently. Final repairs on the pier, which was damaged by fire last year, were completed in time for summer, although the weather Saturday did little to accommodate the occasion. The gray skies, however, didn't stop Richard J. Bond from carting his fishing gear to pier at sunrise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1996 | RUSS LOAR
One of the city's most visible landmarks, the City Hall clock tower, will be outfitted with cellular telephone relay equipment. But image-conscious council members say most of the equipment will be hidden from view. "This will not harm the integrity of our landmark," Mayor Marilyn Bruce Hastings said. "No one will ever know it's there." Officials said they are not sure when the clock tower was erected. The City Hall building was dedicated in 1969.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1995 | RUSS LOAR
Even when your house is 87 feet above the ground, it's still not safe from termites. Exterminators used a crane Monday morning to slowly lower a huge tent over the landmark Water Tower House, perched high above the beach on Anderson Street at Pacific Coast Highway. "They were going to use a helicopter, but that was too expensive," said real estate agent Elgin Johnson. "Termites have no respect, nibbling on this historic house."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1989 | LORELEI LACHMAN
Almost 50 years ago a water tower was erected in Sunset Beach by the Santa Fe Tank & Pipe Co. At the same time, a teen-ager named George Armstrong was busing tables across the street at Sam's Seafood thinking about what a kick it would be to climb that tower. About 40 years later, he got his chance. The tower, owned by the city of Seal Beach, was going to be dismantled. So, Armstrong bought it and became the town hero. Now it's for sale again, for a steep $2.9 million.
NEWS
May 15, 1991 | KATHIE BOZANICH
It is the front of the place--with its eye-catching wrought iron draped in bougainvillea--that gives one pause. While it is unusual to see such a place in the middle of a quiet residential section of town, there are more surprises for those who delve further. For that is what the Seal Beach Inn and Gardens is--a place of surprises, and of romance. Opened in 1924, it was the first bed and breakfast inn in Southern California, according to manager Wendy Stewart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1992 | SHELBY GRAD
A loud and boisterous meeting is expected at the Seal Beach Planning Commission later this month when the public gets its first chance to comment on a proposal to build an oil-change shop and carwash next to the historic redwood water-tower house. The plan by Santa Barbara developer Jeff Overeem is opposed by some residents who believe the oil-change shop isn't a suitable neighbor for one of the area's most beloved and bold landmarks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1995 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The crown jewel of Seal Beach, its 89-year-old wooden pier, has reopened permanently. Final repairs on the pier, which was damaged by fire last year, were completed in time for summer, although the weather Saturday did little to accommodate the occasion. The gray skies, however, didn't stop Richard J. Bond from carting his fishing gear to pier at sunrise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1995 | RUSS LOAR
Even when your house is 87 feet above the ground, it's still not safe from termites. Exterminators used a crane Monday morning to slowly lower a huge tent over the landmark Water Tower House, perched high above the beach on Anderson Street at Pacific Coast Highway. "They were going to use a helicopter, but that was too expensive," said real estate agent Elgin Johnson. "Termites have no respect, nibbling on this historic house."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1994 | SHELBY GRAD
Rising 140 feet into the sky, the water tower off Seal Beach Boulevard is one of the city's most prominent landmarks. So when workers draped the entire structure in a white protective sheet about two months ago, many residents wondered what was going on. "I saw it around Halloween, and I thought they had dressed it up like a ghost," said Louise Jefferies, a 13-year Seal Beach resident. "It looked so odd."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1993 | SHELBY GRAD
Call it "A Miracle on Main Street." Walt's Wharf, the landmark restaurant that was damaged in a fire the day before last Friday's Christmas parade down Main Street, was able to reopen in time for the festivities--thanks to teamwork and help from the community. It almost didn't happen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1993 | SHELBY GRAD
Residents have launched a campaign to prevent an oil-change shop and carwash from being built next to the redwood water-tower house, an architectural landmark on Pacific Coast Highway in Sunset Beach. The effort comes after the Seal Beach Planning Commission last month approved a Santa Barbara developer's plan to develop a vacant lot next to the 52-year-old tower. Residents appealed the vote, meaning the City Council will eventually decide the issue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1992 | SHELBY GRAD
A loud and boisterous meeting is expected at the Seal Beach Planning Commission later this month when the public gets its first chance to comment on a proposal to build an oil-change shop and carwash next to the historic redwood water-tower house. The plan by Santa Barbara developer Jeff Overeem is opposed by some residents who believe the oil-change shop isn't a suitable neighbor for one of the area's most beloved and bold landmarks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1994 | SHELBY GRAD
Rising 140 feet into the sky, the water tower off Seal Beach Boulevard is one of the city's most prominent landmarks. So when workers draped the entire structure in a white protective sheet about two months ago, many residents wondered what was going on. "I saw it around Halloween, and I thought they had dressed it up like a ghost," said Louise Jefferies, a 13-year Seal Beach resident. "It looked so odd."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1991 | SHANNON SANDS
Back when the town was known as Bay City and a Ferris wheel towered by the seashore, Red Cars ferried tourists from inland areas to the "Coney Island of the West." For more than 40 years, the Pacific Electric Red Cars provided a vital service to Orange County. To help preserve memories of those days, the Seal Beach Historical Society bought and refurbished a Red Car in the late 1970s and opened a museum at the corner of Electric Avenue and Main Street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1992 | SHELBY GRAD
The prospect of an unwelcome neighbor has once again galvanized supporters of Surfside's mammoth redwood water tower house, the outlandish beachside landmark that has come to represent this community's eclectic architectural heritage. Twice in as many months, a developer has proposed new construction for a vacant lot next door to the 52-year-old structure. In August, Surfside and nearby Sunset Beach residents mounted a vocal campaign opposing a plan to build two three-story condominiums.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1991 | SHANNON SANDS
Back when the town was known as Bay City and a Ferris wheel towered by the seashore, Red Cars ferried tourists from inland areas to the "Coney Island of the West." For more than 40 years, the Pacific Electric Red Cars provided a vital service to Orange County. To help preserve memories of those days, the Seal Beach Historical Society bought and refurbished a Red Car in the late 1970s and opened a museum at the corner of Electric Avenue and Main Street.
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