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Seal Beach Ca Ordinances

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1994 | SHELBY GRAD
Four newspaper racks containing pornographic publications have been removed from a Marina Drive sidewalk by their owner after city officials informed him that the vending machines violated city laws. The removal was cheered by residents and merchants on the street who had complained to City Hall soon after the machines appeared about a month ago. "They must have been (installed) during the dead of night," said Mayor Gwen Forsythe. "We would have seen it if they were put up during the day."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2000 | ALEX MURASHKO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The City Council will continue to consider an ordinance to give some city staff members the authority to issue citations for code violations. At a recent meeting, the council delayed a final vote on the proposal, intended to put less of a burden on the Police Department and grant more enforcement powers to the city's Development Service Department. Officials say building codes would be easier to enforce with the ordinance.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1989 | LILY ENG, Times Staff Writer
A Newport Beach ordinance that went into effect Thursday to keep jet skiers away from swimmers and surfers has all but barred the sport from the city's waters, enthusiasts said. Jet skiers have rarely zipped out to the ocean from Newport Beach since the ordinance was passed by the City Council last month, lifeguards said. "They haven't been here for weeks," said Capt. Ron Johnson of Newport Beach's Marine Department. "They've gone someplace else."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2000 | ALEX MURASHKO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the record, the grace period for a no-smoking ordinance on the Seal Beach Pier has been over for nearly a month. Instead of just warnings, police officers are now able to fine anyone caught smoking on the wooden landmark. However, some smokers remain unfazed. Despite about a dozen no-smoking signs on the pier's light posts, it's easy to spot people with cigarettes and cigars on any given day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1995 | RUSS LOAR
Mayor Marilyn Bruce Hastings has refused to support a gun-control resolution, sparking a heated debate in which the law-and-order mayor finds herself at odds with the city's police chief. Hastings, who has fought for increased police patrols in the city's beach areas, said at Monday's City Council meeting that she could not support a position paper issued by the California Police Chiefs Assn. The document calls for mandatory gun registration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1992 | MALAIKA BROWN
Organizers of commercial events in the city may have to skip the sale or distribution of alcohol if the City Council decides today to approve sweeping restrictions on public consumption of alcohol. The ordinance up for final adoption would prohibit the sale or distribution of alcohol at any commercial or promotional event. An ordinance pushed by Councilwoman Marilyn B.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1994
An ordinance extending to 10 p.m. the hours that door-to-door solicitors can work was tentatively approved by the City Council this week. In its approval of the first reading of the law, the City Council cited a U.S. Supreme Court decision establishing 10 p.m. as a reasonable cutoff time for residential solicitors and fund-raisers. A private organization soliciting funds for the Sierra Club had complained to city officials about the 8 p.m. deadline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1997 | CATHY WERBLIN
Residents who regularly fail to remove their trash containers from city streets could be ticketed and fined if an ordinance under consideration by city officials is approved. The policy is designed to complement a pending citywide trash-hauling agreement. Officials will have a public hearing on the so-called Solid Waste Ordinance on Feb. 24 at 7 p.m. in City Council chambers, 211 8th St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1990 | MICHELLE NICOLOSI
Two years ago, Mark and Betsy Thompson watched helplessly as neighbors added a second floor to their house, blocking the ocean view the Thompsons had enjoyed from a bedroom window. So the Thompsons decided to build a "doghouse" on top of their home--a small, non-habitable addition permitted under city building codes. But they are creating a doghouse like no other in town: It is a 6-foot-by-6-foot, shiny aluminum dome that rotates 360 degrees and has a mechanical skylight that slides open.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1999 | Harrison Sheppard, (714) 966-5977
Councilman Shawn Boyd wants the city to develop a better system of code enforcement and increase penalties on people who build without getting a permit first. Boyd said that currently, the city relies only on the threat of litigation to enforce building and other codes. Instead, he would like some city employees to be able to write tickets with civil fines attached in order to reduce legal costs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2000 | ALEX MURASHKO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Anticipating a windfall in sales taxes collected from the future tenants of the Bixby Old Ranch Towne Center, the City Council gave initial approval to an ordinance that would reduce the city's utilities tax for residents from 11% to 9.5%. Mayor Patty Campbell said she reluctantly voted for the reduction at the council meeting last week because, "overall, that's what the city wants." But she is concerned about the estimated $28 million needed for the city's infrastructure repair.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2000 | Alex Murashko, (714) 966-5974
The City Council passed an amendment to a city ordinance Monday banning dogs at public parks and beaches. The amendment allows dogs on leashes only at Gum Grove Park and the Electric Avenue greenbelt. Gum Grove Park had been a regular spot for dog walking before the amendment to the ordinance, which was rarely enforced, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1998 | CATHY WERBLIN
Massage practitioners hoping to ply their trade in the city will have to abide by new rules adopted this week by the City Council. Under amendments to the city's existing requirements, masseurs and masseuses will need 600 hours of basic education if they lack experience in the field. The requirement increases by 100 the number of hours needed by new practitioners and falls in line with guidelines issued by the American Massage Therapy Assn.
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