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Seal Beach Ca Public Works

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1999 | Harrison Sheppard, (714) 966-5977
The city will soon solicit bids for cosmetic repairs and maintenance to the pier now that reconstruction of restrooms is almost complete. Preliminary estimates put the cost of the additional work at $25,000 to $40,000.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2000 | Alex Murashko, (714) 966-5974
The City Council granted interim City Manager Don McIntyre permission earlier this week to seek state funds for a $1.5-million project to repair and improve a sand-retaining structure next to the pier. The 750-foot concrete sheet pile, designed to thwart beach erosion, was built in 1959. If the application submitted to the State Department of Boating and Waterways' Erosion Control Program is approved, the city's share could be as much as $375,000.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1998 | HARRISON SHEPPARD
Seal Beach Boulevard will be spruced up with some new trees and landscaping, thanks to a recent state grant of $248,800. A landscaped median strip will be added from Adolfo Lopez Drive to Pacific Coast Highway, and other improvements will be made south of PCH, City Manager Keith Till said. Funding comes from the California Transportation Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1999 | JUDY SILBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As winter approaches, and with it another year of erosion to the shores of Seal Beach, Councilman Shawn Boyd is ready to revisit a project that for years he has sought federal funds for. "I've been on the phone with our Washington lobbyists all week," Boyd said Thursday. "We're looking for more congressional funding." The project Boyd is seeking money for is the construction of an artificial offshore reef that would have three-fold benefits, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1996 | RUSS LOAR
City officials are vowing to continue their battle to replenish the city's badly eroded beaches but face another year without state help. Gov. Pete Wilson last month again eliminated state funding for sand replenishment in the city this fiscal year, according to Seal Beach Mayor Marilyn Bruce Hastings. Without the state's financial contribution, the Army Corps of Engineers will not rebuild beaches in the city's Surfside community, where waves crash just a few hundred feet from homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1995 | RUSS LOAR
The first major street resurfacing project in the downtown area in at least a decade began Wednesday on streets hit hard by last winter's torrential rains. But efforts to win federal funding to upgrade the city's flood control system have stalled. The Jan. 4 rainstorm caused about $5 million in damage to the city, including $3 million at Leisure World, where 300 residents were evacuated after a nearby flood control channel overflowed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1994 | RUSS LOAR
The sound of big trucks lumbering onto local beaches early Tuesday morning was music to the ears of city officials who signed a last-minute deal for the delivery of sand to the city's badly eroded beachfront. Dawn-to-dusk delivery of sand will continue through next week while City Manager Jerry L. Bankston keeps an eye to the sky. Heavy rainfall could put an end to sand removal from the Santa Ana River excavation project near Anaheim Stadium.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1997 | JEAN O. PASCO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Funds for construction projects to protect beachfront homes from flood damage, like that which occurred here last week, were vetoed two years ago by Gov. Pete Wilson. Wilson blue-penciled a $285,000 beach-repair project from the 1995-'96 state budget, saying that the project hadn't been adequately "reviewed or evaluated" and wasn't part of the administration's beach-erosion program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1997 | CATHY WERBLIN
City officials will begin accepting bids for more than $800,000 in Main Street area improvements, including the installation of parking meters in nearby parking lots. During its meeting Monday night, City Council members agreed to also investigate the cost of renovating public restrooms under the pier and in City Hall and adding crosswalks and trees to Main Street. The projects were outlined in the city's ongoing efforts to beautify historic Main Street. A complete plan calls for a total of $3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1992 | SHELBY GRAD
Anyone doubting how austere the city's bare-bones budget is, consider this: The city's largest building project for fiscal 1992-93 will be the renovation of two public restrooms at Marina Park. The City Council last week instructed the staff to collect bids for the project, which is not likely to exceed $90,000. Once the bids are submitted, the council will choose a contractor, usually the one with the lowest bid, said Lee Whittenberg, director of development services.
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