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Seal Beach Ca Taxes

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1996 | RUSS LOAR
There is no end in sight for the city's unpopular 11% utility tax. That's the message City Manager Keith Till delivered to council members this week who approved a bare-bones $12.2-million spending plan for the 1996-97 fiscal year. The new budget provides only partial funding for legally required reserve accounts.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1999 | Louise Roug, (714) 966-5977
The City Council voted to grant utility tax exemptions to senior citizens with low incomes. The council voted 4 to 1 Monday to approve the tax exemptions for residents over 65 years old and with household incomes of $33,132 or less. Mayor Paul Yost cast the dissenting vote. More than 1,500 residents applied for the exemption, which will cost the city about $150,000 in lost revenue, said Councilman Shawn Boyd. "The exemption is a big deal for a lot of people on fixed income," Boyd said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1993 | SHELBY GRAD
With Seal Beach's budget woes continuing to worsen, the City Council has voted to hold public hearings on a plan that could more than double the utility-users tax. The vote last week marked the council's first official action on the often-discussed idea, which if approved would increase the tax that residents pay on monthly telephone, gas and electric bills from 5% to as much as 11%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1996 | RUSS LOAR
There is no end in sight for the city's unpopular 11% utility tax. That's the message City Manager Keith Till delivered to council members this week who approved a bare-bones $12.2-million spending plan for the 1996-97 fiscal year. The new budget provides only partial funding for legally required reserve accounts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1993 | SHELBY GRAD
Faced with a $1.7-million shortfall, some city officials are pinning their hopes on a proposed tax increase on utilities as the least painful way of closing the budget gap. But even if the City Council approves the tax hike next month, Seal Beach's fiscal situation will remain uncertain into the fall, when the U.S. Supreme Court is expected to rule on a complex tax rebate that could force a new round of budget cuts at City Hall. City Manager Jerry L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1993 | SHELBY GRAD
Despite the City Council's vote last month to more than double Seal Beach's utility-users tax, the city still faces a bare-bones budget that will probably require cuts in city spending. Officials, who are putting the finishing touches on the $11.5-million to $11.8-million budget, said that the tax increase might still leave the city with a $200,000 to $300,000 shortfall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1999 | Louise Roug, (714) 966-5977
The City Council voted to grant utility tax exemptions to senior citizens with low incomes. The council voted 4 to 1 Monday to approve the tax exemptions for residents over 65 years old and with household incomes of $33,132 or less. Mayor Paul Yost cast the dissenting vote. More than 1,500 residents applied for the exemption, which will cost the city about $150,000 in lost revenue, said Councilman Shawn Boyd. "The exemption is a big deal for a lot of people on fixed income," Boyd said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1995 | RUSS LOAR
City officials on Monday will consider cutting the highly unpopular 11% utility-users tax. The City Council more than doubled the tax two years ago to help close a $1.7-million budget shortfall but vowed to review the tax each year. Council members say it is the highest utility tax of any Orange County city. "There's going to be some people who come down to our meeting and throw that utility tax right in our faces," said Councilman William J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1995 | RUSS LOAR
The City Council, which has been weighing the possibility of trimming the 11% utility tax, should reconsider for now, departing City Manager Jerry L. Bankston said Monday. Bankston, who leaves Friday to become city manager of La Habra, said he understands the pressures on council members to reduce the unpopular levy on telephone, electricity and natural gas bills, but the city should build up its emergency reserve fund first. The council approved the tax two years ago to help close a $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1995 | RUSS LOAR
The City Council, which has been weighing the possibility of trimming the 11% utility tax, should reconsider for now, departing City Manager Jerry L. Bankston said Monday. Bankston, who leaves Friday to become city manager of La Habra, said he understands the pressures on council members to reduce the unpopular levy on telephone, electricity and natural gas bills, but the city should build up its emergency reserve fund first. The council approved the tax two years ago to help close a $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1995 | RUSS LOAR
City officials on Monday will consider cutting the highly unpopular 11% utility-users tax. The City Council more than doubled the tax two years ago to help close a $1.7-million budget shortfall but vowed to review the tax each year. Council members say it is the highest utility tax of any Orange County city. "There's going to be some people who come down to our meeting and throw that utility tax right in our faces," said Councilman William J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1993 | SHELBY GRAD
Despite the City Council's vote last month to more than double Seal Beach's utility-users tax, the city still faces a bare-bones budget that will probably require cuts in city spending. Officials, who are putting the finishing touches on the $11.5-million to $11.8-million budget, said that the tax increase might still leave the city with a $200,000 to $300,000 shortfall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1993 | SHELBY GRAD
Faced with a $1.7-million shortfall, some city officials are pinning their hopes on a proposed tax increase on utilities as the least painful way of closing the budget gap. But even if the City Council approves the tax hike next month, Seal Beach's fiscal situation will remain uncertain into the fall, when the U.S. Supreme Court is expected to rule on a complex tax rebate that could force a new round of budget cuts at City Hall. City Manager Jerry L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1993 | SHELBY GRAD
Residents will have a chance to express their views about a proposed doubling of the city's utility-users tax at a public hearing scheduled for May 24. The City Council is considering the tax increase as a way of reducing an anticipated $1.7-million budget shortfall. If council members approve the plan, the tax that residents pay on monthly telephone, gas and electric bills will increase from 5% to as much as 11%.
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