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Seal Beach City Council

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1991 | SHANNON SANDS
Applause will be permitted during City Council meetings, the council decided Monday night. The new rules for conduct during meetings were approved, 3 to 2, with Mayor Edna Wilson and council member Joe Hunt dissenting. Wilson said she finds clapping during council meetings distracting. The council had discussed the issue last month for more than 30 minutes without reaching a decision.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2002 | STANLEY ALLISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The four candidates in the race for a Seal Beach City Council seat insist they want to focus on the major issues facing the city, such as the fate of a large parcel of land off the San Gabriel River, whether to keep the utility tax and how to improve ocean water quality. But an investigation into the alleged misdeeds of incumbent Shawn Boyd has all but overshadowed those concerns, making him a clear focal point of the contest.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1990 | MICHELLE NICOLOSI
County Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder will meet with the City Council at 6 p.m. today to lead a study session on the Orange County Fire Department's master plan, the county traffic congestion management plan and paramedic fees. The session will include a discussion of the proposed rate hike for Fire Department services. If approved, the rate hike could increase the city's cost from $1.8 million a year to $2.4 million by 1991.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2002 | STANLEY ALLISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A candidate running for the Seal Beach City Council acknowledged Wednesday that he hasn't lived in the city for six years. Walt Miller, a 71-year-old retired accountant challenging incumbent Shawn Boyd in the March 5 election, listed his son's Seal Beach home on nomination papers, he said. Miller owns the home but rents it to his son. He lives with his wife in a Long Beach condominium. Boyd has three challengers in the race.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1990 | MICHELLE NICOLOSI
Marilyn Bruce Hastings and Gwen Forsythe defeated their opponents in a runoff election Tuesday for two open seats on the Seal Beach City Council. According to Hastings and other local leaders, many of whom have viewed the election as a referendum on the proposed $200-million Mola Development Corp. project, Hasting's victory over Planning Commissioner Joe Rullo reflects an anti-Mola sentiment in the city's District 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1991 | SHANNON SANDS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To clap or not to clap? That was the question taken up by the City Council this week. Buried in a resolution concerning the order of City Council agendas was a provision that clapping by the audience amounts to disorderly conduct that could result in being ejected from a public meeting. After debating the issue for about half an hour, the council deadlocked on the matter--a decision that the audience greeted with loud applause.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1990 | MICHELLE NICOLOSI
When voters go to the polls Tuesday to fill two open seats on the City Council, they will be voting not only for the four candidates in the runoff but also deciding the future of development in this beach community, the candidates say. The central issue in the campaign is the Mola Development Corp.'s proposed $200-million housing project for the Hellman Ranch property.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1998 | PHIL DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shawn Boyd edged out Matthew Duggan in a close race Tuesday to win a seat on the Seal Beach City Council. Boyd, 29, a local business owner, garnered 602 votes, or 50.9% of the total. Duggan, 38, a psychologist, got 569 votes. "I'm really humbled. It's very gratifying," Boyd said. "It's been a long, long campaign. I think the big job now is to take all the divisiveness that's out there and bring everyone together." Duggan could not be reached for comment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1990 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is not uncommon to hear residents here refer to their seaside community as an island, but when it comes to politics, few would describe the city as a paradise. Tuesday's City Council election, however, is shaping up to be different from many others in recent years. Eight candidates are vying for two open seats and are evenly split on the hottest election issue, a huge proposed housing development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2002 | DANA PARSONS
Remember how indignant Shawn Boyd sounded last September? In so many words and in no particular order, this is what he said: Political opponents were out to get him. He'd love to say more so he could clear his name, but his lawyer advised against it. This was all much ado about nothing. Now here we are in early February, a month before Boyd is up for reelection to the Seal Beach City Council, and he's got the district attorney's office on his tail. From what prosecutors have said so far, it's Seal Beach voters who ought to be indignant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2001
The decision by the Seal Beach City Council to ask property owners to approve a fee increase so the city could afford to sweep its streets more often could have a positive ripple effect on the health of the county coastline. Beach closures and urban runoff have become sad facts of coastal life. There were more closures and health warnings between Memorial Day and Labor Day this year than ever before--an increase of more than 73% over the same period last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2001 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Seal Beach City Council voted 4 to 1 Monday night to oppose the local sanitation district's policy of dumping partly treated sewage that fails to meet U.S. Clean Water Act standards. The Orange County Sanitation District pumps 243 million gallons of moderately treated sewage into the Pacific every day--enough to fill the Rose Bowl three times. It has done so legally since 1985, through a series of waivers from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2001 | STANLEY ALLISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Driven to distraction by the chirps and rings of cell phones, Seal Beach this week became one of the first cities in the state to ban the devices from council meetings. The decision was made in response to a recent rash of interruptions during council hearings and deliberations. It comes as public institutions from churches to movie theaters are urging people to shut off their phones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1999 | LOUISE ROUG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The City Council has reversed a decision by the city manager to hire an outside evaluator of his performance, council member Shawn Boyd said Tuesday. Keith Till hired the facilitator last month to oversee the yearly evaluation of his job performance as city manager, but a majority of the council members voted for the City Council to do the assessment as it has done in the past. Till hired Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1999 | Harrison Sheppard, (714) 966-5977
City Council members recently rejected a plan to put Gatorade advertisements on beach trash cans, saying they did not like the look of the proposed displays. The city has an agreement with the Orange Coast Marketing Coalition to receive 125 free trash cans plus $2,000 in cash to allow trash cans with ads on the beach.
NEWS
October 27, 1989
Thank you for your expose on the dangers of the Newport-Inglewood Fault, in comparison to the San Andreas Fault. I only wish the Seal Beach City Council would take notice of your research. It's important for the people of Seal Beach to understand the valuable information you provided, such as the comparison with the San Andreas, and notice that a "sizeably smaller temblor on the Newport-Inglewood Fault could produce the same catastrophic results. The reason is location. . . . Its potential for destruction should it shake or shift is unarguable, experts say. The fault encompasses some of the most intensely developed neighborhoods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1995 | HOLLY J. WAGNER
Plans by Huntington Beach to allow as many as 18,500 additional homes and more than 3 million new square feet of commercial space in the city ignore the potentially serious impact on neighboring Seal Beach, that city's council has protested. "The thing that I'm amazed with is the amount of development the city of Huntington Beach is proposing," Seal Beach Councilwoman Gwen Forsythe said.
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