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Seal Beach Naval Weapons Center

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1991 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Nine surface-to-air missiles en route to the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station were jostled but undamaged in a Texas traffic collision early Thursday, military officials said. Explosives experts from Dyess Air Force Base in Abilene were rushed to the town of Clyde on Interstate 20, where they declared the cargo "undamaged and intact," although the missiles had shifted, Air Force Capt. John Ames said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1991 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Nine surface-to-air missiles en route to the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station were jostled but undamaged in a Texas traffic collision early Thursday, military officials said. Explosives experts from Dyess Air Force Base in Abilene were rushed to the town of Clyde on Interstate 20, where they declared the cargo "undamaged and intact," although the missiles had shifted, Air Force Capt. John Ames said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1998 | PHIL DAVIS
City officials are urging the U.S. Navy to use extreme caution when removing tons of contaminated soil from an old battery acid dump site near McGaugh Elementary School. "We're just saying, 'Hey, keep in mind there are 800 kids pretty close [to the clean-up site],' " said Lee Whittenberg, the city's director of development services. "I think they're going to be fairly careful, but we just wanted to go on the record that we had some concerns."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Orange County agencies have been fined $175,000 for polluting sensitive coastal estuaries. The Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board fined the county's Integrated Waste Management Department $125,000 last week and the Public Facilities and Resources Department $50,000 on March 23. The Frank R.
NEWS
July 23, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
World War III, if it ever comes to Los Angeles, will mean megatons of hell. To Soviet war planners, Southern California is loaded with attractive targets: nuclear weapons facilities, military bases, defense plants, military command centers and even a civil defense command center. Except for Washington, Los Angeles would be the ripest urban area in the United States for an attack by the Soviet Union. Theodore A.
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