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Seal Beach Naval Weapons Stations

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1996 | RUSS LOAR
The Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station has been named the Navy's top facility of its kind for the second consecutive year, receiving the Hammer Award for model and cost-effective operations. More than 200 Navy facilities were nominated for the award, which was created by Vice President Al Gore to recognize efficiency in government.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
Five juvenile burrowing owls flapped across a salt marsh at the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station on a recent weekday, matching the loops and curves of dragonflies and moths before snatching their prey midair. Soon, the owls will be feasting on larger prey, including lizards, rodents and birds. That could present a touchy problem for the base's 1,000-acre wildlife refuge, which is also home to a breeding colony of federally endangered least terns. There are four breeding pairs of burrowing owls left along the Southern California coast between Santa Barbara and Encinitas, and all of them nest at the Orange County base.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1997
As part of a nationwide downsizing, the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station will eliminate 81 civilian jobs, the Department of Navy announced Wednesday. The Navy said it will have to eliminate 1,201 jobs nationwide by July because of declining workload. In hopes of avoiding actual layoffs at the Seal Beach base, the Navy is offering early retirement and "separation incentives" up to $25,000, according to naval officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2001 | LOUIS SAHAGUN and ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two light planes, each carrying two people from a flying club in Long Beach, collided over the San Pedro Channel and plunged into the ocean just outside the Long Beach Breakwater on Thursday. There were no signs of survivors. One of those aboard the planes was identified by his family as Mike Chisholm, 56, owner of a flight school in Chino. The others were not identified.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER ADAMS
The City Council Monday added its voice to the growing opposition to a Navy proposal to build a $200-million expansion of its port facilities at the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station. Council members voted 4 to 0, with Mayor Edna Wilson abstaining, to formally oppose the expansion project that would change the configuration of Anaheim Bay. The council decision came despite a plea by Capt. Stephen T.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2001 | LOUIS SAHAGUN and ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two light planes, each carrying two people from a flying club in Long Beach, collided over the San Pedro Channel and plunged into the ocean just outside the Long Beach Breakwater on Thursday. There were no signs of survivors. One of those aboard the planes was identified by his family as Mike Chisholm, 56, owner of a flight school in Chino. The others were not identified.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER ADAMS
The trapping and killing of the red fox to protect endangered birds at the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station should continue, but measures should be taken to improve and protect the birds' nesting grounds, according to a federal environmental report released Friday. A federal judge in 1988 ordered the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S. Navy to prepare the report after an animal rights group sued to halt a program to trap foxes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
Five juvenile burrowing owls flapped across a salt marsh at the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station on a recent weekday, matching the loops and curves of dragonflies and moths before snatching their prey midair. Soon, the owls will be feasting on larger prey, including lizards, rodents and birds. That could present a touchy problem for the base's 1,000-acre wildlife refuge, which is also home to a breeding colony of federally endangered least terns. There are four breeding pairs of burrowing owls left along the Southern California coast between Santa Barbara and Encinitas, and all of them nest at the Orange County base.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1997
As part of a nationwide downsizing, the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station will eliminate 81 civilian jobs, the Department of Navy announced Wednesday. The Navy said it will have to eliminate 1,201 jobs nationwide by July because of declining workload. In hopes of avoiding actual layoffs at the Seal Beach base, the Navy is offering early retirement and "separation incentives" up to $25,000, according to naval officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1996 | RUSS LOAR
The Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station has been named the Navy's top facility of its kind for the second consecutive year, receiving the Hammer Award for model and cost-effective operations. More than 200 Navy facilities were nominated for the award, which was created by Vice President Al Gore to recognize efficiency in government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER ADAMS
The City Council Monday added its voice to the growing opposition to a Navy proposal to build a $200-million expansion of its port facilities at the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station. Council members voted 4 to 0, with Mayor Edna Wilson abstaining, to formally oppose the expansion project that would change the configuration of Anaheim Bay. The council decision came despite a plea by Capt. Stephen T.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER ADAMS
The trapping and killing of the red fox to protect endangered birds at the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station should continue, but measures should be taken to improve and protect the birds' nesting grounds, according to a federal environmental report released Friday. A federal judge in 1988 ordered the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S. Navy to prepare the report after an animal rights group sued to halt a program to trap foxes.
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