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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1990 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal authorities have seized about 140 pounds of almost pure "China White" heroin from a container ship in Long Beach Harbor--the largest amount confiscated in the Los Angeles area, officials said Thursday. The heroin, conservatively valued at $100 million on the street, was seized Dec. 21. The seizure revealed "the emergence" of Vietnamese as "major players" in heroin trafficking in Los Angeles and Orange counties, said Ralph Lochridge, a spokesman for the Drug Enforcement Administration.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1990 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal authorities have seized about 140 pounds of almost pure "China White" heroin from a container ship in Long Beach Harbor--the largest amount confiscated in the Los Angeles area, officials said Thursday. The heroin, conservatively valued at $100 million on the street, was seized Dec. 21. The seizure revealed "the emergence" of Vietnamese as "major players" in heroin trafficking in Los Angeles and Orange counties, said Ralph Lochridge, a spokesman for the Drug Enforcement Administration.
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BUSINESS
March 17, 1999 | Bloomberg News
CSX Corp. said it will split its Sea-Land Service Inc. business, the biggest U.S. ocean-shipping company, into three units in a move that may make it easier to sell. CSX, which also owns the third-largest U.S. railroad, will separate Sea-Land into a company that handles port business, a domestic shipping company and an international shipper. Richmond, Va.-based CSX is shifting its focus to its railroad. The company is absorbing its purchase of part of Conrail Inc.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1991 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Defense Department organization overseeing the return of military cargo from the Persian Gulf has contended to the Federal Maritime Commission that it was overcharged by a shipping company. The Navy's Military Sealift Command also said Thursday that it is weighing alternatives, including a possible lawsuit, to attempt to recover what might be tens of millions of dollars in overcharges by Sea-Land Service Inc. Sea-Land, with offices in Edison, N.J., is a subsidiary of CSX Corp.
BUSINESS
December 13, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Negotiators for the U.S. and China on Friday reached an agreement giving American shipping lines greater access to Chinese ports and related businesses while easing restrictions on China's main shipping line. The accord was reached after an all-day session between Chinese officials and representatives from the U.S. State and Transportation departments. The pact "has something for everyone.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Danish shipping giant A.P. Moeller said Thursday it will pay $800 million for the international operations of CSX Corp.'s Sea-Land Service Inc., the largest container ship operator at the Port of Long Beach. In a letter dated Thursday, top officials from Moeller's Maersk Line, CSX and Sea-Land said they did not anticipate any disruption in shipping schedules or cargo volume at U.S. ports because of the merger.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Port of Long Beach on Wednesday said it signed an agreement with a major South Korean shipping line to operate a 375-acre cargo terminal on the site of the former Long Beach Naval Station. That site was the focus of a bitter fight two years ago when the port tried to lease the historic base to a firm owned by the Chinese government. If completed, the deal with the Hanjin Shipping Co.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Intel Corp. went looking for skilled engineers in the early 1970s, Dov Frohman, an Israeli citizen and inventor of the erasable programmable read-only memory chip, suggested his homeland. Two decades later, the Santa Clara, Calif.-based semiconductor giant has become a key part of Israel's high-tech boom, investing several hundred million dollars in a design center and semiconductor plant. Now Intel plans another $1-billion chip plant in Kirat Gat, 30 miles outside Jerusalem.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1991 | DENISE GELLENE and CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In Moscow to complete a hotel deal, Irvine executive Paul Tatum instead found himself on the barricades. After learning Tuesday that embattled Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin was having difficulty placing calls outside the Soviet Union, Tatum made his way into Yeltsin's besieged headquarters and lent his cellular telephone to Yeltsin's aides. He was determined, the president of Americom International Corp.
NEWS
January 3, 1993 | From National Geographic
New gateway cities are prying open the defunct Soviet empire, once known for its near-paranoid obsession with heavily guarded borders, to a flood of ideas, goods and people. In the process, Moscow, once called the "Third Rome" as the center of the Byzantine world and later of the Communist state, has been downgraded as a port of call. "Lights are blinking on in cities once controlled by Moscow and captured in the Soviet system," said geographer George J.
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