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NEWS
March 29, 2012 | By Morgan Little
Headed by a prominent Democratic contributor, a new "super PAC" called "Animal Lovers Against Romney " will move forward with a single purpose: publicizing the story of Mitt Romney and how he treated his dog, Seamus. Bob McDevitt, the leader of the operation, has officially filed for the PAC's creation, which already has a website and a $1-million budget. "Mitt is a mean dude. If Romney treats his own pet like this, how do you think he'll treat you?" the site's homepage asks.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2013 | By Robert Faggen
Thirty years ago, I became a graduate teaching fellow in a popular undergraduate course at Harvard University called Modern Anglo-Irish Poetry. What made it popular? The subject matter was certainly rich. But the professor, Seamus Heaney, was the special attraction. He was already a major figure in the poetic landscape; we watched him artfully mapping its peculiar geography. Heaney, who died Friday in Dublin at age 74, was powerful and widely read, receiving countless honors, including the Nobel Prize.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2009 | Susan King
It's hard to envision veteran British actor Malcolm McDowell cooing, but the 66-year-old star of such classic films as Lindsay Anderson's "If . . . " and Stanley Kubrick's "A Clockwork Orange," for which the actor will always be remembered as a vicious hood, turns out to have a weak spot: his three youngest children. "It's pretty magnificent on the whole," says McDowell of his second time around as a father, as he scrolls through his iPhone looking for pictures of his children with third wife, Kelley Kuhr -- 5-year-old Beckett; 2-year-old Finn and 7-month-old Seamus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON -- Seamus Heaney, the Nobel Prize-winning poet whose crystalline, descriptive verse led many to consider him the best Irish poet since Yeats, died Thursday. He was 74. His death was confirmed by his publishers, Faber and Faber, which said that it could not "adequately express our profound sorrow at the loss of one of the world's greatest writers. His impact on literary culture is immeasurable. " The publishing house said in a statement issued on behalf of his family that Heaney died in a Dublin hospital after a short illness.
BOOKS
February 9, 1992
He'll never rise again but he is ready. Entered like a mirror by the morning, He stares out the big window, wondering, Not caring if the day is bright or cloudy. An upstairs outlook on the whole country. First milk-lorries, first smoke, cattle, trees In damp opulence above damp hedges-- He has it to himself, he is like a sentry Forgotten and unable to remember The whys and wherefores of his lofty station, Wakening relieved yet in position, Disencumbered as a breaking comber.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Seamus Heaney, the poet and essayist from Ireland who won the Nobel Prize for literature in 1995, has died . He was 74. An Irish Catholic who was growing up in Ulster when the Troubles began and who later moved to Dublin, Heaney engaged with the violence in Northern Ireland, sometimes through history and myth, exploring the conflicting emotions it raised. "We lived deep in a land of optative moods, / under high, banked clouds of resignation," he wrote in "From the canton of expectation.
BOOKS
May 23, 1993
In the middle of the journey of our life I found myself astray in a dark wood where the straight road had been lost sight of. How hard it is to say what it was like in the thick of thickets, in a wood so dense and gnarled the very thought of it renews my panic. It is bitter almost as death itself is bitter. But to rehearse the good it also brought me I will speak about the other things I saw there.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2013 | By Robert Faggen
Thirty years ago, I became a graduate teaching fellow in a popular undergraduate course at Harvard University called Modern Anglo-Irish Poetry. What made it popular? The subject matter was certainly rich. But the professor, Seamus Heaney, was the special attraction. He was already a major figure in the poetic landscape; we watched him artfully mapping its peculiar geography. Heaney, who died Friday in Dublin at age 74, was powerful and widely read, receiving countless honors, including the Nobel Prize.
NEWS
September 20, 1989
Seamus Twomey, 70, a founder of the modern Irish Republican Army and the mastermind of the IRA's deadly car-bomb campaign in Belfast. Twomey, former manager of a bookmaker's shop, was a founding member of the breakaway Provisional IRA, set up after trouble flared in Northern Ireland in 1969. Twice the IRA's chief of staff, he was arrested in the Irish Republic in 1973 but escaped with two other IRA leaders in a dramatic helicopter airlift from Dublin's Mountjoy Prison in 1973.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts kicked off its new Sierra Nights series Wednesday with a performance by the quartet of jazz tenor saxophonist Seamus Blake. The program was the first of a monthly series, held on Wednesday nights in the intimate setting of the Sierra Room Theatre, a room that, like the large Cerritos Center auditorium, can be formatted differently for programs ranging from jazz and cabaret to classical music and special events.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Seamus Heaney, the poet and essayist from Ireland who won the Nobel Prize for literature in 1995, has died . He was 74. An Irish Catholic who was growing up in Ulster when the Troubles began and who later moved to Dublin, Heaney engaged with the violence in Northern Ireland, sometimes through history and myth, exploring the conflicting emotions it raised. "We lived deep in a land of optative moods, / under high, banked clouds of resignation," he wrote in "From the canton of expectation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Seamus Heaney was already one of Ireland's best-known poets when the sectarian violence of "The Troubles" swept through Northern Ireland in the 1970s and '80s. An Irish Republican activist spotted him on a train and challenged Heaney to craft some words in support of the IRA fighters then waging a hunger strike in a British prison. Heaney declined. Instead he wrote dark verses about death drifting across the Irish landscape and a 1979 poem called "The Singer's House" that defended the right of art to exist for its own sake, even in times of war. "When I came here first you were always singing," Heaney wrote, in response to a friend's decision to cancel a music recording session after a Belfast bombing.
NEWS
August 14, 2012 | By Christi Parsons, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
OSKALOOSA, Iowa -- Nothing livens up a long road trip like a wisecrack about Seamus the dog. Inspired perhaps by his eight hours of driving the Iowa countryside this week, President Obama managed to work Seamus into a discussion of wind energy tax credits here on Tuesday. Seamus, of course, was Ann and Mitt Romney's family dog, the one they claim used to love being strapped in his carrier to the top of the car during vacation travel. The story has produced no end of ridicule from Democrats and inspired the organization of “Dogs for Obama.”  Obama has stayed away from teasing Romney on the subject, but on Tuesday he couldn't resist as he was interpreting the Romney critique of his energy policy for a farm crowd.
NEWS
June 5, 2012 | By Melanie Mason
An anonymous hacker claimed to have broken into Mitt Romney's personal e-mail account Tuesday, allegedly gaining access by guessing the answer to the security question, “What is your favorite pet?” A tipster to Gawker bragged of the hack into the presumptive GOP nominee's Hotmail and Dropbox accounts and claimed to have changed its password, but did not include any screen shots of the accounts' content as proof. Gawker did not attempt to use the changed password to access the account - that could land the site in legal hot water - but it did alert the Romney campaign to the alleged hacker's claim.
NEWS
March 29, 2012 | By Morgan Little
Headed by a prominent Democratic contributor, a new "super PAC" called "Animal Lovers Against Romney " will move forward with a single purpose: publicizing the story of Mitt Romney and how he treated his dog, Seamus. Bob McDevitt, the leader of the operation, has officially filed for the PAC's creation, which already has a website and a $1-million budget. "Mitt is a mean dude. If Romney treats his own pet like this, how do you think he'll treat you?" the site's homepage asks.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2011 | By Carmela Ciuraru, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Carl Dennis is known for his quiet lyricism, and his latest, "Callings" (Penguin: $18 paper), is similarly contemplative and restrained. Yet beneath their reticent surface, these poems brim with big questions about vocation, regret, identity and other issues, as in "Outdoor Café": No book or paper, and no expectation A friend will be joining me later on. Just the silent acceptance of life As it flows in the talk around me. With its constant questioning of what might have been and what's been lost, "Callings" is an apt poetic companion in these uncertain and anxious economic times.
NEWS
June 5, 2012 | By Melanie Mason
An anonymous hacker claimed to have broken into Mitt Romney's personal e-mail account Tuesday, allegedly gaining access by guessing the answer to the security question, “What is your favorite pet?” A tipster to Gawker bragged of the hack into the presumptive GOP nominee's Hotmail and Dropbox accounts and claimed to have changed its password, but did not include any screen shots of the accounts' content as proof. Gawker did not attempt to use the changed password to access the account - that could land the site in legal hot water - but it did alert the Romney campaign to the alleged hacker's claim.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2010 | By Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Times
Stepping Stones Interviews with Seamus Heaney Edited by Dennis O'Driscoll Farrar, Straus & Giroux, $18 paper Irish Nobel Laureate Seamus Heaney is our greatest living poet, and here's a combination for connoisseurs. "Stepping Stones" is a book-length series of linked interviews with the poet conducted by poet Dennis O'Driscoll. It all adds up to an autobiography. When Heaney recently turned 70, Ireland's national radio had the poet record his readings of his poems for broadcast.
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