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Sean Abrams

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1995
About 60 prospective panelists made it through the first phase of jury selection on Thursday in the murder trial of Snoop Doggy Dogg--one of America's best known rappers--and two co-defendants. "It is what we call a 'high-profile' case," Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Paul Flynn told nearly 100 potential panelists, some of whom groaned, as the morning began.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1995 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prosecutors in the Snoop Doggy Dogg murder trial Monday dropped charges against a co-defendant who was in the rear seat of the rapper's Jeep at the time of the alleged 1993 drive-by killing. Although prosecutors Ed Nison and Bobby Grace said they will consider refiling murder charges against Sean Abrams later, the decision Monday removes from the courtroom--at least temporarily--a lawyer with whom the district attorney's office had some trouble in a recent unrelated case: Johnnie L. Cochran Jr.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1995
A state appeals court has denied a request to allow into evidence unedited taped statements made to police by two defendants in the Snoop Doggy Dogg murder trial, prompting prosecutors to consider the possibility of dropping charges--and then refiling them--against the rapper and a co-defendant. By dismissing and then refiling the charges against Snoop (a.k.a.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1995
A state appeals court has denied a request to allow into evidence unedited taped statements made to police by two defendants in the Snoop Doggy Dogg murder trial, prompting prosecutors to consider the possibility of dropping charges--and then refiling them--against the rapper and a co-defendant. By dismissing and then refiling the charges against Snoop (a.k.a.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1995 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prosecutors in the Snoop Doggy Dogg murder trial Monday dropped charges against a co-defendant who was in the rear seat of the rapper's Jeep at the time of the alleged 1993 drive-by killing. Although prosecutors Ed Nison and Bobby Grace said they will consider refiling murder charges against Sean Abrams later, the decision Monday removes from the courtroom--at least temporarily--a lawyer with whom the district attorney's office had some trouble in a recent unrelated case: Johnnie L. Cochran Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1995 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prosecutors in the Snoop Doggy Dogg murder trial Tuesday filed an appeal of a Superior Court judge's decision to edit taped statements made to police by two defendants, contending that the action weakens their case by forcing them to rely on testimony from officers of the embattled Los Angeles Police Department. Deputy Dist. Atty. Ed Nison said prosecutors are asking the California Court of Appeal to halt jury selection in the case until the dispute over the statements can be resolved.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1995 | TINA DAUNT and CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
You heard about all the allegations of police incompetence in the O.J. Simpson case. Now get ready for Snoop Doggy Dogg. Jury selection in the murder trial of one of the nation's most popular rap singers is set to start today, and defense attorneys for the rapper, his bodyguard and his friend are planning a full-scale attack on the credibility of the Los Angeles Police Department. Even Johnnie L. Cochran Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1995
A judge said Friday he is leaning toward letting murder charges stand against rapper Snoop Doggy Dogg, his bodyguard and another man, even though the prosecution lost some evidence in the case. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Paul Flynn said defense lawyers have failed, at least so far, to prove that police purposely destroyed bloody clothes, a bullet and a shell casing from the Aug. 25, 1993, killing of Philip Waldermariam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1995
A Superior Court judge--angered over Snoop Doggy Dogg's tardy appearance in court Friday--threatened to send the rapper to jail if he is late for any more appearances in his pending murder case. Superior Court Judge Paul Flynn was angry when the lanky Long Beach entertainer, whose real name is Calvin Broadus, was tardy for a court appearance at the Criminal Courts Building. Raising his voice, Judge Paul Flynn said he expected the defendant to take the charges more seriously.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1995
A judge Friday postponed a hearing until May 19 on whether to drop murder charges against rapper Snoop Doggy Dogg and two others in a case in which some prosecution evidence has been lost. Prosecutors and attorneys for the rapper, whose real name is Calvin Broadus, were scheduled to resume the hearing that began last week. At issue is why police destroyed bloody clothes, a bullet and a shell casing related to the Aug. 25, 1993, killing of Philip Waldermariam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1995 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prosecutors in the Snoop Doggy Dogg murder trial Tuesday filed an appeal of a Superior Court judge's decision to edit taped statements made to police by two defendants, contending that the action weakens their case by forcing them to rely on testimony from officers of the embattled Los Angeles Police Department. Deputy Dist. Atty. Ed Nison said prosecutors are asking the California Court of Appeal to halt jury selection in the case until the dispute over the statements can be resolved.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1995
About 60 prospective panelists made it through the first phase of jury selection on Thursday in the murder trial of Snoop Doggy Dogg--one of America's best known rappers--and two co-defendants. "It is what we call a 'high-profile' case," Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Paul Flynn told nearly 100 potential panelists, some of whom groaned, as the morning began.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1995 | TINA DAUNT and CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
You heard about all the allegations of police incompetence in the O.J. Simpson case. Now get ready for Snoop Doggy Dogg. Jury selection in the murder trial of one of the nation's most popular rap singers is set to start today, and defense attorneys for the rapper, his bodyguard and his friend are planning a full-scale attack on the credibility of the Los Angeles Police Department. Even Johnnie L. Cochran Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1994
A judge refused Friday to revoke bail for rapper Snoop Doggy Dogg's bodyguard, despite allegations by the prosecution that the murder defendant has committed other crimes and purchased a gun since the slaying. Superior Court Judge Paul G. Flynn ordered McKinley Lee, 24, confined to his home with an electronic device monitoring his whereabouts pending trial Jan. 13. Snoop Doggy Dogg, whose real name is Calvin Broadus, Lee, and acquaintance Sean Abrams, 24, were indicted for the Aug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1994
A judge on Tuesday set a trial date of Jan. 13 for rapper Snoop Doggy Dogg and two other people accused of killing a Long Beach man last year. The tall, thin singer, whose real name is Calvin Broadus, spoke only once during the 30-minute hearing before Superior Court Judge Paul Flynn. He and co-defendants McKinley Lee and Sean Abrams all answered "yes" when asked if they would waive their right for the trial to start at an earlier date.
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