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ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp
When children go to sleep tonight, the visions dancing in their heads will more likely be those of electronic gizmos than of sugar plums. But the kiddos will doze off believing , and that collective faith fascinates author William Joyce, who created the "Rise of the Guardians" book series that became the basis of the new DreamWorks animated movie. "It stumps me that we as a people decided en masse without a vote that we would tell our kids about Santa Claus," Joyce says from his home in Shreveport, La. "I know where it started, but the psychology remains mystifying to me. How many things have we as a species agreed upon without discussing?
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp
When children go to sleep tonight, the visions dancing in their heads will more likely be those of electronic gizmos than of sugar plums. But the kiddos will doze off believing , and that collective faith fascinates author William Joyce, who created the "Rise of the Guardians" book series that became the basis of the new DreamWorks animated movie. "It stumps me that we as a people decided en masse without a vote that we would tell our kids about Santa Claus," Joyce says from his home in Shreveport, La. "I know where it started, but the psychology remains mystifying to me. How many things have we as a species agreed upon without discussing?
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2009 | Susan King
Hotspur. Harry Hotspur. Two years before Sean Connery became an international sensation as James Bond in "Dr. No," he played the role of the Scotsman Hotspur -- a.k.a. Sir Henry Percy -- in the BBC's 1960 15-part series "Shakespeare's An Age of Kings." And not only is the 30-year-old Connery easy on the eyes, he effortlessly handles the Bard's prose. "Shakespeare's An Age of Kings," which aired in syndication on U.S.
OPINION
November 7, 2012
Re "Keeping 007 relevant in a changing world," Nov. 4 Age is irrelevant: Batman is 73 years old and the franchise has never been stronger. Thomas Bliss Sherman Oaks There is no dilemma over the relevance of the 007 franchise. Sean Connery is still alive, period. Wendy A. Robinson Saugus ALSO: Letters: Justice and minors Letters: The power of voting Letters: Religion, not politics
BUSINESS
October 10, 2002 | James Bates
MEDIA * Actor Sean Connery sued producer Peter Guber and his Mandalay Pictures in Los Angeles County Superior Court over the unraveling this year of the CIA thriller "End Game." Connery alleged that Mandalay was "nothing more than a house of cards," using the film project to mask a precarious financial situation. The actor said Mandalay agreed to pay him $17 million for the role but lacked funding to make the film because its German financing dried up.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1992 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A doctor who claims to be the model for the "Medicine Man" depicted by Sean Connery in the recent movie of that name sued the actor and others connected with the film Monday, contending that they misappropriated the doctor's autobiographical story and misrepresented his work with Amazon Indians. In their copyright infringement suit, the doctor, Wilburn H.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1992 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If it's true, as director Steven Spielberg once said, that there are only seven genuine movie stars in the world and that Sean Connery is one of them, one could go on to make the case for Connery--who receives the seventh American Cinematheque Award tonight--as first among equals. His James Bond series was one of the most hugely successful in movie history (in its time, 1964's "Goldfinger" was the fastest money-maker ever, grossing $10 million in just a few months).
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2000 | RICHARD NATALE, Richard Natale is a regular contributor to Calendar
The pairing of Sean Connery and newcomer Rob Brown as mentor and pupil in "Finding Forrester" is a study in contrasts, both on and off the screen. Although they're both more than 6 feet tall, Connery is broad-shouldered and robust while Brown is lithe and boyish. The two are at opposite ends of their professional lives. At 70, Connery is in the autumn of an astonishing career dating to the early 1950s. Brown, who was born in 1984, is making his motion picture debut.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Joseph Wiseman, a stage and screen actor who played the sinister title character in "Dr. No," the 1962 film that introduced Sean Connery as James Bond, has died. He was 91. Wiseman, who had been in declining health in the last few years, died Monday at his home in Manhattan, said his daughter, Martha Graham Wiseman. The Canadian-born Wiseman already had appeared on Broadway numerous times and in films such as "Detective Story" and "Viva Zapata!" when he was cast as the mysterious villain opposite Connery's 007. The diabolical Dr. No was a formidable foe. As Los Angeles Times movie critic Philip K. Scheuer put it: "Out pfui-ing Fu Manchu, Dr. No reveals himself to be the head of a vast underworld organization called SPECTER and dedicated to the destruction and domination of mankind.
NEWS
December 5, 1993 | SUSAN CAMPBELL, THE HARTFORD COURANT
The woman walked slowly on stage, wrapped in a nondescript bathrobe, clutching a handbag. She began to sing--off-key--Rodgers and Hammerstein's "If I Loved You." She fumbled a little, mumbled a lot and then said, "Heck with it," stripped off the bathrobe, dropped the handbag, and there stood a vibrant, pretty, smooth-faced woman--singing on key in a black-and-red skirt suit. With that little gouge at stereotypes, Alice P. Allyn, 82, of Colchester, Conn., brought down the house at this year's Ms.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2011
Sean Connery Connery grew up in Scotland near the Bruntsfield Links golf course but had no desire to play. But that changed when he was taught golf to look good enough to beat Gert Fröbe in a match in 1964's "Goldfinger. " "I got the bug," Connery later said. "Soon it would nearly take over my life. " Alice Cooper Cooper, who came to fame in the 1970s, battled booze before giving up drinking for the golf course. In fact, he wrote a book about it, "Alice Cooper, Golf Monster: A Rock 'n' Roller's Life and 12 Steps to Becoming a Golf Addict.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
The legend of Robin Hood is firmly entrenched in British folklore — an archer and swordsman who, with his band of merry men, robbed from the rich and gave to the poor during the early 12th century in Nottinghamshire's Sherwood Forest. Originally portrayed as a commoner, Robin's image changed so that he was later thought of as a nobleman who lost his lands and was cast out as an outlaw. The earliest surviving ballads telling his story are dated to the 15th century or early 16th century.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2010
SERIES America's Worst Driver: The two-part season finale recognizes one motorist with a dubious title (10 and 11 p.m. Travel). Saturday Night Live: Betty White hosts this new episode with musical guest Jay-Z (11:29 p.m. NBC). SPECIALS Rescued: Soledad O'Brien hosts this special that chronicles the aftermath of the Haitian earthquake through the eyes of two orphans, Cendy and Marc Kenson, who were abandoned years ago by their parents but later taken in at the orphanage of an American missionary family (5 and 8 p.m. CNN)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2009 | By Susan King
The American Cinematheque's Egyptian Theatre blasts into the new year with "The Best of James Bond: 007," which features four Sean Connery classics and a double bill of the best -- or is that an oxymoron? -- of the Roger Moore Bond flicks. The martinis begin to shake Friday with 1962's "Dr. No," which made Connery a superstar. Ursula Andress, Joseph Wiseman and Jack Lord also star. Rounding out the evening is the fifth of the Connery Bonds, 1967's "You Only Live Twice," which is set in Japan and features a script by Roald Dahl.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2009
Re "Unshakable Bond," by Susan King, Nov. 4: Albert "Cubby" Broccoli's comment that "Bond was bigger than the actor who played him" might be a little self-righteous, since the statement implies that the producers who created Bond on the screen are solely responsible for his success. Sean Connery sitting at the chemin de fer table and introducing himself as James Bond, and introducing Bond to moviegoers, is arguably the most magnetic introduction of any character in motion picture history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Joseph Wiseman, a stage and screen actor who played the sinister title character in "Dr. No," the 1962 film that introduced Sean Connery as James Bond, has died. He was 91. Wiseman, who had been in declining health in the last few years, died Monday at his home in Manhattan, said his daughter, Martha Graham Wiseman. The Canadian-born Wiseman already had appeared on Broadway numerous times and in films such as "Detective Story" and "Viva Zapata!" when he was cast as the mysterious villain opposite Connery's 007. The diabolical Dr. No was a formidable foe. As Los Angeles Times movie critic Philip K. Scheuer put it: "Out pfui-ing Fu Manchu, Dr. No reveals himself to be the head of a vast underworld organization called SPECTER and dedicated to the destruction and domination of mankind.
NEWS
December 27, 1987
The "Barbara Walters Special" was wonderful. I got the inside scoop on three of my favorite actors--Eddie Murphy, Sean Connery and Don Johnson. Maya Andrews, Fountain Valley
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1990 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Connery, Sean Connery: Actor Sean Connery will receive an award from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts for his "outstanding contribution to world cinema," the academy announced Thursday. Connery, who played James Bond until 1983, will be only the third recipient of the academy's Tribute Award. The previous winners were Dirk Bogarde and Julie Andrews. Connery, who turns 60 on Saturday, won the 1988 best supporting actor Oscar for "The Untouchables."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2009 | Susan King
Hotspur. Harry Hotspur. Two years before Sean Connery became an international sensation as James Bond in "Dr. No," he played the role of the Scotsman Hotspur -- a.k.a. Sir Henry Percy -- in the BBC's 1960 15-part series "Shakespeare's An Age of Kings." And not only is the 30-year-old Connery easy on the eyes, he effortlessly handles the Bard's prose. "Shakespeare's An Age of Kings," which aired in syndication on U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Sean Connery will offer the first public glimpse of his memoirs at this year's Edinburgh Book Festival, organizers announced Thursday. The former James Bond star, a high-profile Scottish nationalist, will launch "Being a Scot" on Aug. 25, his 78th birthday. The first -- and, many say, the best -- actor to play 007 on the big screen, Connery is a vocal supporter of the pro-independence Scottish National Party. He lives in the Bahamas and has said he will not reside in Scotland until it gains independence from Britain.
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