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Sean Freeman

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January 31, 1988 | Eve Lichtgarn, Formerly the book review editor of the UCLA Daily Bruin, Lichtgarn is currently obtaining a law degree. and
The Vietnam War veteran has been reduced to a veritable stereotype in recent literature and cinema. The typical vet is depicted as an outcast who can't enter the mainstream of an America that is embarrassed by and ungrateful for the services he rendered. At worst, the veteran is categorized within a narrow, negative band of social misfits which doesn't extend beyond bitter addicts, dangerous mercenaries or deranged killers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
When I first met Sean Freeman, he was about to become a teen-ager. We were shagging flies in center field during the very loose-jointed softball game that was part of an annual multifamily picnic in Rustic Canyon Park. You could write a novel or a series of novels or a long-running soap opera about the vicissitudes in the lives and marriages and careers of all of those friends who used to gather, noisily and pleasurably, in the park.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
When I first met Sean Freeman, he was about to become a teen-ager. We were shagging flies in center field during the very loose-jointed softball game that was part of an annual multifamily picnic in Rustic Canyon Park. You could write a novel or a series of novels or a long-running soap opera about the vicissitudes in the lives and marriages and careers of all of those friends who used to gather, noisily and pleasurably, in the park.
BOOKS
January 31, 1988 | Eve Lichtgarn, Formerly the book review editor of the UCLA Daily Bruin, Lichtgarn is currently obtaining a law degree. and
The Vietnam War veteran has been reduced to a veritable stereotype in recent literature and cinema. The typical vet is depicted as an outcast who can't enter the mainstream of an America that is embarrassed by and ungrateful for the services he rendered. At worst, the veteran is categorized within a narrow, negative band of social misfits which doesn't extend beyond bitter addicts, dangerous mercenaries or deranged killers.
SPORTS
October 23, 1999
Estancia High jumped out early and held on to beat Laguna Beach, 20-14, in a Pacific Coast League game Friday at Orange Coast College. "I'll take it," said Dave Perkins, the Eagles relieved coach. "I told my team that the good teams win games like this and two weeks ago, we would not have won this ball game. But we hung in there and we pulled it out." Laguna Beach (3-4, 0-2 in league) turned the ball over to the Eagles six times, all interceptions, resulting in all of Estancia's points.
NEWS
September 3, 1999
1998 RECORD: 1-9 overall, 0-5 in league COACH: Dave Perkins (1-9 at school) RETURNING STARTERS: 9 on offense, 9 on defense TOP RETURNERS Robert Aguilera, OT/NG, 6-2, 255, Jr.; John Alderete, WR/DB, 5-10, 175, Sr.; Griffin Crogan, TE/LB, 6-1, 240, Sr.; Ivan Garcia, LB/RB, 6-0, 195, Jr.; Marshall Hendricks, RB/DB, 6-1, 185, Jr.; Fahad Jahid, RB/LB, 6-2, 235, Jr.; Matt Mueller, FB/LB, 5-10, 185, Jr.; David Rodriguez, OG/DE, 5-9, 225, Sr.; Cesar Romero, OG/LB, 6-2, 230, Jr.
NEWS
April 15, 1991 | RAY TESSLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid the rejoicing over victory, friction has developed at Camp Pendleton between some newly returned veterans of the Gulf War and Marines who quietly served stateside during the conflict. Many Marines who wanted to fight alongside their comrades against Iraq feel guilty or depressed because they were left behind to run the base, train fresh troops, and handle less-than-headline-grabbing jobs supporting the war effort.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1991 | RAY TESSLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid the rejoicing over victory, friction has developed at Camp Pendleton between some cocky, newly returned veterans of the Gulf War and Marines who quietly served stateside during the conflict. Many Marines who desperately wanted to fight alongside their comrades against Iraq feel guilty or depressed because they were left behind to run the base, train fresh troops and handle less-than-headline-grabbing jobs supporting the war effort.
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