Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSean Harrigan
IN THE NEWS

Sean Harrigan

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
February 21, 2003 | James F. Peltz, Times Staff Writer
The California Public Employees' Retirement System, the nation's largest pension fund, Thursday elected labor leader Sean Harrigan as president of its board over rival candidate Willie Brown, San Francisco's mayor. Harrigan's post carries little independent power, but he will be a key voice in CalPERS' direction, analysts said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2009 | David Zahniser
Two of Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's appointees to a city pension board resigned Thursday, one month after receiving a letter from the Securities and Exchange Commission asking them to identify income they had received from companies doing business with their agency. Sean Harrigan and Elliott Broidy, members of the Los Angeles Fire and Police Pensions board, were asked to provide information to the SEC, which is investigating allegations of kickbacks at a New York state pension fund.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
December 12, 2004
It is entirely appropriate that union boss Sean Harrigan was replaced on the board of the California Public Employees' Retirement System ("Activist Chief at CalPERS Is Voted Out," Dec. 2). Harrigan demonstrated the same conflicts of interest that he and his fellow CalPERS board members were so critical of in businesses across the U.S. Harrigan, who works for United Food and Commercial Workers, used his CalPERS post as a bully pulpit to advance the causes of organized labor and other political agendas.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2009 | David Zahniser and Walter Hamilton
An investigation of alleged pension-fund improprieties that already has entangled New York state officials, a key Obama advisor and a well-connected political consultant has now reached a Los Angeles agency that invests more than $10 billion for retired city firefighters and police officers.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2004 | Richard Verrier
The president of the California Public Employees' Retirement System said he welcomed the decision by Walt Disney Co.'s board to name a successor to Chief Executive Michael Eisner by June. "I think the Disney board acted properly, and I think June of next year is a reasonable time to complete their search," CalPERS President Sean Harrigan said. The group previously had called for Eisner's resignation.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2005
Regarding: "At CalPERS, Change In Style, Not Focus," July 25: I was somewhat bemused as I read this article, especially state Controller Steve Westly's comments. He referred to CalPERS, under my presidency, "like a Chihuahua, yapping at everybody." If "everybody" means: CalPERS' condemnation of former New York Stock Exchange Chairman Richard Grasso's $190-million compensation package and the significant reforms CalPERS achieved. Walt Disney Co.'s dismal performance under Michael Eisner's leadership and CalPERS' demand for new leadership.
OPINION
December 8, 2004
Sean Harrigan's article on the Commentary page, "The Corporations Couldn't Tolerate My Activist Voice" (Dec. 5), is right on. It was some time ago that Ralph Nader said that the pension funds of unions, public employees and others, where the money being invested belongs to the worker, should be controlled in the best interests of the workers. It appears that Harrigan did just that. It also appears that Harrigan is going to continue to fight until the members of a fund have the right to make some real decisions about the board of directors.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2004 | Michael Hiltzik
Like a gang of schoolyard bullies, business leaders nationwide are gloating over the ouster of CalPERS President Sean Harrigan, as though they want to claim credit for hanging his pelt on the wall. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, for example, cynically praised the removal of Harrigan, who had become one of the country's leading spokesmen for shareholder rights, as providing "hope for California retirees and shareholders."
BUSINESS
November 30, 2004 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
The head of the California Public Employees' Retirement System said Monday that he was being ousted from the board of the nation's largest public pension fund, where his efforts to use its $177-billion investment portfolio to push an array of corporate reforms have roused the ire of business interests. Sean Harrigan, president of CalPERS since early 2003, is a union official who serves on the pension fund's panel as the representative of the state Personnel Board.
SPORTS
April 3, 1985 | MIKE HISERMAN, Times Staff Writer
The Simi Valley High baseball team can lay claim to yet another No. 1 ranking. The Pioneers, already ranked first in both the Southern Section and state polls, ascended to the top rung in the Valley on Tuesday afternoon at Birmingham High, beating highly regarded Chatsworth, 7-6, in the championship game of the Monroe Tournament. Chatsworth is generally considered one of the top two teams in the City Section. It was the Chancellors' first loss after five wins.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2005
Regarding: "At CalPERS, Change In Style, Not Focus," July 25: I was somewhat bemused as I read this article, especially state Controller Steve Westly's comments. He referred to CalPERS, under my presidency, "like a Chihuahua, yapping at everybody." If "everybody" means: CalPERS' condemnation of former New York Stock Exchange Chairman Richard Grasso's $190-million compensation package and the significant reforms CalPERS achieved. Walt Disney Co.'s dismal performance under Michael Eisner's leadership and CalPERS' demand for new leadership.
BUSINESS
December 14, 2004 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
The reports of Sean Harrigan's demise weren't premature after all. The activist's effort to regain a seat on the California Public Employees' Retirement System board ended Monday when Assembly Speaker Fabian Nunez reappointed a veteran Los Angeles labor leader to the influential pension board. National labor leaders had asked Democrats in the Legislature to tap Harrigan for another term and Harrigan himself lobbied Nunez. But Nunez (D-Los Angeles) named Mike Quevedo Jr.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2004
It is entirely appropriate that union boss Sean Harrigan was replaced on the board of the California Public Employees' Retirement System ("Activist Chief at CalPERS Is Voted Out," Dec. 2). Harrigan demonstrated the same conflicts of interest that he and his fellow CalPERS board members were so critical of in businesses across the U.S. Harrigan, who works for United Food and Commercial Workers, used his CalPERS post as a bully pulpit to advance the causes of organized labor and other political agendas.
OPINION
December 8, 2004
Sean Harrigan's article on the Commentary page, "The Corporations Couldn't Tolerate My Activist Voice" (Dec. 5), is right on. It was some time ago that Ralph Nader said that the pension funds of unions, public employees and others, where the money being invested belongs to the worker, should be controlled in the best interests of the workers. It appears that Harrigan did just that. It also appears that Harrigan is going to continue to fight until the members of a fund have the right to make some real decisions about the board of directors.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2004 | Michael Hiltzik
Like a gang of schoolyard bullies, business leaders nationwide are gloating over the ouster of CalPERS President Sean Harrigan, as though they want to claim credit for hanging his pelt on the wall. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, for example, cynically praised the removal of Harrigan, who had become one of the country's leading spokesmen for shareholder rights, as providing "hope for California retirees and shareholders."
BUSINESS
December 4, 2004 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
Sean Harrigan, whose ouster this week as president of the California Public Employees' Retirement System made headlines around the world, may soon be back on the board of the $177-billion pension fund. Harrigan lost his seat when the state Personnel Board voted 3 to 2 on Wednesday to replace him as its CalPERS representative.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2004 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
Sean Harrigan, whose ouster this week as president of the California Public Employees' Retirement System made headlines around the world, may soon be back on the board of the $177-billion pension fund. Harrigan lost his seat when the state Personnel Board voted 3 to 2 on Wednesday to replace him as its CalPERS representative.
BUSINESS
December 14, 2004 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
The reports of Sean Harrigan's demise weren't premature after all. The activist's effort to regain a seat on the California Public Employees' Retirement System board ended Monday when Assembly Speaker Fabian Nunez reappointed a veteran Los Angeles labor leader to the influential pension board. National labor leaders had asked Democrats in the Legislature to tap Harrigan for another term and Harrigan himself lobbied Nunez. But Nunez (D-Los Angeles) named Mike Quevedo Jr.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2004 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
The head of the California Public Employees' Retirement System said Monday that he was being ousted from the board of the nation's largest public pension fund, where his efforts to use its $177-billion investment portfolio to push an array of corporate reforms have roused the ire of business interests. Sean Harrigan, president of CalPERS since early 2003, is a union official who serves on the pension fund's panel as the representative of the state Personnel Board.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2004 | Richard Verrier
The president of the California Public Employees' Retirement System said he welcomed the decision by Walt Disney Co.'s board to name a successor to Chief Executive Michael Eisner by June. "I think the Disney board acted properly, and I think June of next year is a reasonable time to complete their search," CalPERS President Sean Harrigan said. The group previously had called for Eisner's resignation.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|