Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSean Huze
IN THE NEWS

Sean Huze

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2005 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
"My life has not been about being safe," says actor-turned-Marine-turned-activist Sean Huze. "As long as we on the left are talking about anything other than Iraq, the right is winning." He lists issues he sees politicians and the media ignoring: ongoing troop and civilian casualties, uncontrolled civilian contractors, still-insufficient military equipment. "We're told that all the vehicles going over there are up-armored, and they're not," he says.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2005 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
"My life has not been about being safe," says actor-turned-Marine-turned-activist Sean Huze. "As long as we on the left are talking about anything other than Iraq, the right is winning." He lists issues he sees politicians and the media ignoring: ongoing troop and civilian casualties, uncontrolled civilian contractors, still-insufficient military equipment. "We're told that all the vehicles going over there are up-armored, and they're not," he says.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2007
IN an otherwise insightful and intriguing article about the genesis of the play "Flags," and its mysterious author Jane Martin ["A Dramatic Battle to Bring War Onto Stage," Aug. 26], Sean Mitchell laments the fact that the American stage has yet to produce a signature piece of the ongoing Iraqi conflict.
OPINION
April 2, 2005
"True war stories do not generalize," Tim O'Brien wrote in "The Things They Carried," his collection of stories about the Vietnam War. "For example: War is hell. As a moral declaration, the old truism seems perfectly true, and yet because it abstracts, because it generalizes, I can't believe it with my stomach.... A true war story, if truly told, makes the stomach believe." "The Sand Storm: Stories From the Front," one of the first plays to be written about Iraq, is a true war story.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2005 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
A delayed-action charge lurks beneath the free-form flow of Jeff Key's "The Eyes of Babylon," and its reach is acute. By placing his account of being a gay Marine in Iraq and its aftereffects in the guise of confessional performance art, writer-performer Key disarms our defenses with considerable humor and lingering punch. Brick Williamson's bare set at Tamarind Theatre, twin drapes behind three simple cubes, suggests scores of Highways outings over the years.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2007 | David C. Nichols, F. Kathleen Foley
Populist tactics meet cultural realities in "Black & Bluestein," and if it is more old-school than cutting-edge, that's only appropriate. By couching this study of racial prejudice and real estate values in 1963 St. Louis as boulevard comedy-drama, playwright Jerry Mayer lets his valid central point sneak up on us.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2007 | Steve Lopez
The day I met with two Iraq war vets at a Hollywood theater was even bloodier than most in Iraq. Two car bombs at a market killed 88 Iraqis Monday and wounded 168. Between Friday and Monday, 30 American troops were also killed. Sean Huze, a vet, actor and playwright, can't help himself. He keeps checking the Internet for the latest, and every time he does, he sees the troop casualty count rise.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2006 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Like a recurring nightmare that haunts us in ever-changing forms, the war in Iraq has called forth a compelling series of documentaries -- "Gunner Palace," "Occupation: Dreamland," the current "Iraq for Sale," the Sundance-winning but still unreleased "Iraq in Fragments," among many others -- that tell us what is going on in that agonized country with more depth and immediacy than any other medium has managed.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2007 | Gina Piccalo, Times Staff Writer
The film has an Oscar-winning writer-director and three Oscar-winning stars, but when it came to authenticity on the set of "In the Valley of Elah," Paul Haggis turned to a real Iraq war veteran who'd never acted a day in his life. Twenty-four-year-old Jake McLaughlin was a U.S. Army infantryman whose battalion was the first on the ground for the invasion of Baghdad. His real dream was to be an actor, but without a nest egg and with a wife and two kids to support in Chico, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2005 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
IN Robert Schenkkan's new play "Lewis and Clark Reach the Euphrates," President Jefferson's intrepid emissaries from two centuries ago take a wrong turn and find themselves in contemporary Iraq, just before the war. They're greeted by the wheeler-dealer Ahmad Chalabi, who assumes that the president they represent is named Bush. Schenkkan, who says he's "profoundly angry" about the war, found a sharp contrast between the "noble rhetoric of Lewis and Clark and the reality they discovered.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2004 | Philip Brandes;David C. Nichols;Rob Kendt;F. Kathleen Foley
Playwright Eric ("On the Verge") Overmyer's signature love affair with language embraces the hard-boiled lexicon of noir in "Dark Rapture," a moody, modern-day thriller at the Evidence Room. This impressively staged caldron of larceny, sex, deceit and murder gets off to an incendiary start with antihero Ray (Nick Offerman) watching a Bay Area hillside fire consume his home with the kind of glee usually reserved for arsonists and Enron traders.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|