Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSean Landers
IN THE NEWS

Sean Landers

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1994 | SUSAN KANDEL
Sean Landers belongs to the second generation of "bad boy"/"just pathetic" artists. His predecessors--Mike Kelley, Jim Shaw, Cary Leibowitz, et al.--got in their licks before the ranks began to swell. Now, there's more competition--and Landers doesn't handle it well. Things begin to go wrong when he adopts a strategy that already seems hoary with age, and then shifts into overdrive, aiming for a pathos so overwhelming it is transgressive.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1994 | SUSAN KANDEL
Sean Landers belongs to the second generation of "bad boy"/"just pathetic" artists. His predecessors--Mike Kelley, Jim Shaw, Cary Leibowitz, et al.--got in their licks before the ranks began to swell. Now, there's more competition--and Landers doesn't handle it well. Things begin to go wrong when he adopts a strategy that already seems hoary with age, and then shifts into overdrive, aiming for a pathos so overwhelming it is transgressive.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1994 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just as everyone in New York art society was waking up from the 1980s with what felt like a bad hangover, Sean Landers came onto the scene. His 1990 show at the Postmasters Gallery included a group of clay sculptures covered in plastic trash bags to disguise their apparent mediocrity.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1994 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just as everyone in New York art society was waking up from the 1980s with what felt like a bad hangover, Sean Landers came onto the scene. His 1990 show at the Postmasters Gallery included a group of clay sculptures covered in plastic trash bags to disguise their apparent mediocrity.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1997 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few of us get to live with sophisticated contemporary art before committing to buy it. But if you have the cash, you might consider luxuriating for a week or two this fall on a cruise ship that doubles as a floating gallery. Launched in late 1995 by Celebrity Cruises, the Galaxy is stocked with 450 modern and contemporary pieces by prominent and lesser-known artists from the United States, Europe and Japan.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1995 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It is probably a misnomer to characterize "gone," at Blum & Poe Gallery, as a group show. With only five works by four artists, "gone" is more like a provocation--and thank goodness. Overstuffed group shows with grandiose themes almost invariably fail these days, and "gone" steers clear of almost all their pitfalls. Its theme is work located on the periphery of sense, of genres, of aesthetics.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2005 | David Pagel, Special to The Times
If you drive in Los Angeles, it's hard to miss the Dove Firming Lotion billboards that show hefty women smiling widely as they strike playful poses in underwear my grandmother would approve of. And if you visit "Likeness: Portraits of Artists by Other Artists" at Cal State Long Beach's University Art Museum, you can't miss the art world's version of the same thing: Heather Cantrell's glossy photograph of Mary Kelly lounging poolside like a stern odalisque.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1989 | DAVID COLKER
A year ago Thomas Solomon opened a garage and went into the family business. He does not change oil, spark plugs or air filters in the two-car garage, located on an alley in the Fairfax District. What Solomon is trying to change, in a quiet way, is the way people think about art galleries. "I didn't want to be on a boulevard. I didn't want a sign out front," said the soft-spoken Solomon as he leaned against his homemade desk.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2004 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
The survey of Minimalism currently at the Museum of Contemporary Art partly chronicles the disappearance of pedestals from modern sculpture in the 1960s, when art shook off its privileged trappings and got down on the floor it shares with you and me. A savvy show at Sister Gallery uses the occasion to ruminate on the phenomenon -- on what was gained and what lost when pedestals became obsolete. The title is "The Thought That Counts."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1995 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At Jan Baum Gallery, Milano Kay's paintings of women play out Baudelaire's notion of Modernity. They have something of the eternal in them: woman as cipher, seductive and mysterious. They also bear something of the new: navel rings, couture rereadings of ethnic dress, asymmetrical bobs and underwear worn as outerwear. In Baudelaire's estimation, to be modern is to be at odds with oneself. Kay (previously known to art audiences as Milano Kazanjian) enacts this romantic truism.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|